Critical STEM + C Futures: Re-Imagining Equity Paths for the Next Generation of Maker Teaching and Learning

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Recent developments in computing and bio technologies have had unprecedented impacts on contemporary education—broadening participation and spurring innovation pipelines. In addition, the Maker movement appears to be a promising space and theoretical vantage point to explore teaching and learning in areas where creativity, personal interests, and production are central parts of engagement. Last, recent scholarship has rightfully problematized the risks that emerge when issues of equity are not emphasized at the forefront of learning experience designs. This session will explore these issues in the context of next-generation technology-driven making, to identify paths in future research and practice that might support productive and critical assessments of technology, increasing the collective impact on teaching and learning. New Blog! >>

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November Expert Panel: Re-Imagining Equity Paths for the Next Generation of Maker Teaching and Learning

Recorded: November 28, 2022
Description: This session will bring several topics together, while highlighting inspiring projects that connect them. It will address computing and bio technologies which have had unprecedented impacts on contemporary education, the Maker movement, which has provided a vantage point to explore teaching and learning through creativity, personal interests, production, as well as how equity can be emphasized at the forefront of learning experience designs. We look forward to your participation!


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  • Icon for: Eli Tucker-Raymond

    Eli Tucker-Raymond

    November 28, 2022 | 03:43 p.m.

    Hi Everyone!

    Thanks for coming to the panel discussion! Join our network of critically minded and culturally relevant maker researchers and educators: https://craft-network.org/

    eli

  • November 30, 2022 | 11:01 a.m.

    Thanks, Eli! I just perused the site and noticed a whole trove of related publications in the reference section, two that stood out to me included: 

     

    Barajas-López, F., & Bang, M. (2018) Indigenous Making and Sharing: Claywork in an Indigenous STEAM Program, Equity & Excellence in Education, 51:1, 7-20, DOI: 10.1080/10665684.2018.1437847

    Blikstein, P., & Worsley, M. A. B. (2016). Children Are Not Hackers: Building a Culture of Powerful Ideas, Deep Learning, and Equity in the Maker Movement. In K. Peppler, E. Halverson, & Y. B. Kafai (Eds.), Makeology (1st ed., Vol. 1). Routledge.

  • November 30, 2022 | 10:58 a.m.

    What a wonderful discussion—about Making and opportunities to lead with equity! While this isn't a new subject in Making, it is great to reinvigorate conversation.

    I wonder from folks interested keeping ideas going—where in the world have you seen great exemplars of making that forefronts equity. Post them here!

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Related Resources

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Publication: Phi Delta Kappan (Aug 2020)

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