March 2022: Broadening the Landscape of Citizen Science

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Citizen science is considered an exceptional mechanism for authentic STEM learning and evidence of the benefits of citizen science for all learners is growing. However, evidence also suggests that citizen science is only reaching a relatively narrow slice of the public, and calls are growing for making citizen science more inclusive as an effective and authentic means to engage the public in the scientific enterprise. This month’s theme focuses on overall engaging a broader audience in citizen science and exploring promising practices for broadening participation in various citizen science projects and more broadly in informal STEM education. View Synthesis >>

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March 2022: Broadening the Landscape of Citizen Science

 

Recorded: March 8, 2022 at 3:00 PM ET

Description: This Online Panel focuses on overall engaging a broader audience in citizen science and exploring promising practices for broadening participation in various citizen science projects and more broadly in informal STEM education.


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Related Resources

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