2135 Views
  1. James Callahan
  2. http://ClimateChangeEducation.org
  3. Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)
  1. Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  2. https://cires.colorado.edu/outreach/people/katie-boyd
  3. Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), University of Colorado Boulder
  1. Liz Bullock
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/bullockliz
  3. Middle School STEM/Science Teacher
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), Lowell School Washington DC, Climate Club DC
  1. Gina Fiorile
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/gina-fiorile-99265b91
  3. Program Coordinator
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), University of Colorado Boulder
  1. Anne Gold
  2. https://cires.colorado.edu/outreach/people/anne-u-gold
  3. Director of CIRES Education & Outreach
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Colorado Boulder, Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)
  1. Abigail Stark
  2. https://twitter.com/climatescilabs
  3. Associate Producer and STEM Instructor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)
Facilitators’
Choice
Presenters’
Choice

CLEAN Network

NA17OAR4320101

2022 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades K-6, Grades 6-8, Grades 9-12, Undergraduate, Informal, All Age Groups

Abigail Stark has not been deterred, by the powerful voices saying she, as a young woman of color, is inherently incapable of being a leader in STEM. In fact, her student teams have successfully pioneered a true STEM innovation: the ability to dramatically pinpoint energy waste anywhere across a city. These middle and high school students are making a serious, meaningful, and inspiring contribution to climate action. They are now accepted as highly skilled, valuable energy consultant volunteers and interns by in their home town of Washington DC: 

Smithsonian National Museums, the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, National Parks Service, US Capitol Police Department, Montgomery County Maryland, USGBC National Capital Region, and in local DC schools.

The video provides an authentic testimonial and thank you to the federally funded program which provides the education resources particularly used by these students’ teachers: CLEAN.

The CLEAN collection contains over 700 free, online, peer-reviewed, NGSS aligned, and ready-to-use educational resources for teaching about climate and energy including activities, lab demonstrations, visualizations, and videos which are easily searchable through various tags. CLEAN also provides pedagogical support for teaching climate and energy topics through background knowledge pages, a professional development toolkit, and a professional learning community to help educators with many aspects of bringing climate science into the classroom. CLEAN now includes materials for elementary school grades.

CLEAN is part of CIRES, and is primarily funded by NOAA. With additional funding by NSF, NASA, and DOE.

SHORT-wavelength infrared cameras are the student’s primary STEM tool. Spectrum analyzer diffraction grating lens filters on full spectrum Vis./SWIR cameras are also used.  The students are not only gaining valuable experience in STEM, but are practicing their language arts, communications, social sciences, and visual arts skills.  After all, making major advances in Capitol Hill becoming more energy efficiency takes both powerful evidence and the skills of effective persuasion. Many have tried and failed, where the students in this video have been very successful.

Abigail and her team members are creating Access, Inclusion and Equity; and are not deterred by fierce resistance.

Having studied CLEAN resources for years, the students of Mobile Climate Science Labs, Climate Club DC, and Lowell School are regular session presenters at two leading international science conferences:  American Geophysical Union (AGU), and American Association for the Advancement of Science  (AAAS).

For example (Science Conference Presentations):

agu2021fallmeeting-agu.ipostersessions.com/Default.aspx?s=DE-66-C3-3B-FF-1E-A8-88-48-6A-22-CB-D4-19-98-F1

agu2021fallmeeting-agu.ipostersessions.com/Default.aspx?s=36-18-C0-6E-1A-8D-0F-2F-85-EA-B8-B9-32-7D-00-D8

All music in this video is licensed for use through BenSound.com.  

 

 

This video has had approximately 535 visits by 273 visitors from 154 unique locations. It has been played 332 times.
activity map thumbnail Click to See Activity Worldwide
Map reflects activity with this presentation from the 2022 STEM For All Video Showcase website, as well as the STEM For All Multiplex website.
Based on periodically updated Google Analytics data. This is intended to show usage trends but may not capture all activity from every visitor.
show more
Discussion from the 2022 STEM For All Video Showcase (36 posts)
  • Icon for: Abigail Stark

    Abigail Stark

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Producer and STEM Instructor
    May 9, 2022 | 05:16 p.m.

    I’m incredibly grateful for the opportunity to participate in this showcase. Including the voices and actions of young people in this fight is crucial; we will be dealing with the consequences of present actions, so it is imperative that we help make those decisions. This is my second year as a video producer for this showcase and I’m excited to be doing this again. Most of all, I’m grateful to you for watching this, for sharing your opinions and views. This fight is collaborative. We need to communicate if we want change. This is not something we can endlessly squabble over, an all-too-familiar occurrence in Washington DC. We need clear communication to reach our shared goal.

    I am also endlessly grateful to the CLEAN staff: Katie, Anne, and Gina. CLEAN’s educational resources have helped to empower my fellow students and I to peruse the goal of climate justice. Young women already face so many difficulties in life, and we cannot continue to deny them access to choices that will make our future.

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Co-Presenter
    Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
    May 9, 2022 | 05:49 p.m.

    CLEAN is excited to support students like Abigail and Mobile Climate Science Labs in bringing climate change education into classrooms. The CLEAN collection contains 800+ free, online, peer-reviewed, NGSS aligned, and ready-to-use educational resources for teaching about climate and energy including activities, lab demonstrations, visualizations, and videos which are easily searchable through various search features and tags. These resources are reviewed by scientists and educators and the collection is syndicated to the NOAA Teaching Climate Portal, making it the official federal government collection of climate & energy teaching resources. CLEAN also provides pedagogical support for teaching climate and energy topics, including background pages on climate & energy topics, resources for building climate units, a bimonthly newsletter connecting resources to current events, professional development webinars, and a toolkit to help educators with many aspects of bringing climate into the classroom.

    CLEAN also supports a community of practice for educators (formal and informal) and educator enthusiasts through the CLEAN network. An active email list and weekly meetings bring folks together to discuss issues in climate education and spur the kind of action discussed in this video. Learn more about it and join us here: https://cleanet.org/clean/community/index.html

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Anne Gold

    Anne Gold

    Co-Presenter
    Director of CIRES Education & Outreach
    May 9, 2022 | 08:25 p.m.

    CLEAN is excited to support and inspire teachers, students and their communities with resources, background knowledge, webinars and a strong support system, the CLEAN Network.

    Abigail and her team bring the value of such a resource collection to live and showcase how youth can be inspired towards action and shaping our climate future. Voices like Abigail's are important to share the value of a climate education program like CLEAN. Join the conversation here in the Video Showcase and check out CLEAN at cleanet.org. There are many ways to get involved, join our conversation and share our commitment to climate and energy education (cleanet.org). 

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Kevin Cooper

    Kevin Cooper

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 10, 2022 | 08:26 a.m.

    Love to learn more about the mobile climate-smart labs. Great great work, you should be very proud

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Gina Fiorile
    Abigail Stark
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • May 10, 2022 | 12:24 p.m.

    The passion that you display in this video for this project work is inspiring. It is a service to the world for the CLEAN network to have helped bring so many important climate-related learning resources to teachers and students. Our project has been developing and studying weather and climate-focused learning materials to promote students' data literacy skills and understanding of important climate-related concepts. In our own project resources, we aim to provide more examples of community activism and resilience to climate change to help young people see that positive change is possible. If you have examples of youth activism from different parts of the country, to help students from different geographic areas connect with what's possible in their specific locations, we'd love to learn more. 

     
    5
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Gina Fiorile
    Abigail Stark
    James Callahan
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • Icon for: Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Co-Presenter
    Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
    May 10, 2022 | 05:58 p.m.


    Thank you, Josephine! Your curriculum looks like it is being well developed - CLEAN always appreciates resources that use scientific data. Once you have a finalized version and if you feel it's relevant to climate (we don't always include weather resources unless they have a climate focus), please suggest it for our collection: https://cleanet.org/clean/participate/suggest_resource.html



     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 11, 2022 | 04:17 p.m.

    Your video was very energizing.  Hearing the enthusiasm of the student, combined with the community-based actions of the participants underscores the power of the next generation when it is harnased and nurtured.  Our work is in equity systems change and your work illustrates how it is possible to move away from the status quo in ways that capture the needs and interest of young people and, in turn, impact existing institutions in positive ways.  I will be interested in learning more about how you measure change and the impact on student participants.  

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gina Fiorile
    James Callahan
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 11, 2022 | 04:29 p.m.

    Vivian,  Your feedback means a great deal to me.  Abigail will be reading it this evening when she gets off of school. (She is in the 9th grade in Maryland, in the county just north of DC). That you share your reaction as a member of the team that produced YOUR video will mean the world to her too.

    We've been viewing the videos in the Showcase, and noting which video teams we simply MUST provide supportive comments to.  I'm being quite honest that yours was already on our short list.  

    Readers of this comment can take this as a recommendation:  Please see and comment on the "Vivian's video,"  in the link above and to the left.

    We have 6 more days to be in conversation on-line. Yes... Please! I look forward to our comparing notes.  To look for ways to collaborate in the year(s) ahead.

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    Vivian Guilfoy
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Abigail Stark

    Abigail Stark

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Producer and STEM Instructor
    May 11, 2022 | 05:27 p.m.

    Thank you so much. I have gotten so much support from adults throughout my time working with James, but encouragement from people like you never loses its meaning. This is a multi-generational fight. Everyone has a part in this, everyone can contribute, and often kids aren’t included in that “everyone”. Even if our opinions are acknowledged, we are judged as “not have anything meaningful to bring to the table”. Reading all of these incredibly supportive comments from people who do acknowledge the thoughts, views, and opinions of young people is so, so inspiring. It gives me so much hope.

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    Vivian Guilfoy
    James Callahan
  • May 11, 2022 | 06:11 p.m.

    Hi Abigail.  Thanks so much for your comments.  It's clear to me from your video that when young people, like yourself, combine hope, purpose and creative actions, the world can change for the better.  And you are right.  It will take "all" of us to look squarely at root causes of injustice and inequity, understand the real needs of people, and co-construct options that change the status quo and move toward a better and more sustainable world.  When our Equity Systems Change Compass Tool is published, we would like your group to take a closer look at it and think about ways that your teams or others may be able to use it to enhance your work.  My best to you.  

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Abigail Stark
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Remy Dou

    Remy Dou

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 09:18 p.m.

    I think this is such a cool project and I love the natural transition from the scientific contributions of students to the contributions of teachers empowered by the tools developed through this project. I resonate with may of the comments already listed above. As a video showcase facilitator, I am encouraged by the shared excitement generation by this video and the contributions it makes to the showcase. Thank you! 

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 13, 2022 | 12:02 p.m.

    Remy,

    One of the great benefits to us presenters, when taking part in the Showcase, is getting to meet the facilitators. 

    How does the Showcase do it?! How is it that the best educators and leaders in STEM education and social justice come together in this one annual event.?  (Those are rhetorical questions. The Showcase makes the details of its methods available to all. Perfection.)

    We are so glad to meet up with you.  To have you as a facilitator is incredible. As you saw, given Twitter activity, we've been getting to know your important work. I hope it is OK for a presenter to say to a facilitator.  If not, please don't read this until after May 17.  It is sincere.  I hope that we stay in touch.  We believe strongly in your work.  Where collaboration is practical and timely, let's not fail to advance working together.

    Thirty three cheers for the STEM for All Video Showcase, and its collaborative spirit and achievements!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: LaShawnda Lindsay

    LaShawnda Lindsay

    Facilitator
    Research Scientist
    May 11, 2022 | 10:19 p.m.

    This project seems very engaging and offers an exciting snippet into the work that is being produced from the project. I am curious about how implementation of the CLEAN. How many students participated in the project?  What are the demographics of the students? How long did the participate in the project?  What was the impact of their learning?  

    Again, wonderful video. 

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 11, 2022 | 11:38 p.m.

    LaShawnda!  Woah, I am simply floored by the facilitators we are so fortunate to have engaged with this video.  You and Remy.. just now Harrison too!  There is so much we have to learn from your work, and insight. All of you.

    There is much I will just step back on and let Abigail and you chat.  Maybe Noemi Milam will be able to chime in too -- one of the 7th grade students in Climate Club at Lowell.  I'll especially leave it to the students (who might better be described as the younger colleagues on our team) to speak to the impact of their learning.  And their dedicated work.  ... Ahem... STEM-based climate action.

    How can our work not be intertwined with action on social justice?  We're not shy that we are deliberately working to prove, by example, that it is simply wrong for something akin to Apartheid to exist relative to STEM. Including it being wrong on who is supposedly not capable to be STEM leaders.. Our presenters share a passion to prove what is possible.

    I think I can respond more on the numbers and demographics questions.  There are many layers to our work, and much history.  

    Specifically, on the pioneering of this STEM innovation -- being able to do energy efficiency surveys quickly and accurately of buildings as large as the US Capitol, the National Museum of Natural History, National Museum of African American History and Culture, and buildings on the Howard University Campus... that really took off in 2020 -- in the very early stages of the COVID pandemic.

    The initial teams were all students at Lowell School in Washington DC. 6th-9th graders. First at the school and in their homes; next was a survey of the National Gallery of Art. Teams now are at 9 high schools in the Montgomery County Public School system. That's in partnership with the POWER program, sponsored by the Mo. county Department of Environmental Protection.  (Big kudos to Larissa Johnson on that!)  Abigail graduated from Lowell last year and now is in the 9th grade at Albert Einstein High School, working with the mentor for the Environmental Club, Lydia Walker... and Abigail's fellow students.

    The energy efficiency surveys in DC evolved from the partnership between Lowell School and Mobile Climate Science Labs.  That started at the school, while providing hands-on science labs on a mass scale in DC -- especially to communities of color.  For instance, at the 2019 AAAS Family Science Days.  In partnership with the Howard University Department of Chemistry.

    Abigail is one of the students who have been STEM lab presenters since 2018.  Educators in climate science (itself a form of community level climate action), not just learners. Several of the labs already focused on short-wavelength infrared light. (With others on long-wavelength infrared light.) Approximately 40 students have been engaged in presenting hands-on science labs in the communities and to students in their elementary (primary) school. Including at major scientific conferences.

    The programs are on-going, with the design being to grow and advance.  No end in sight.  So it is up to each student how long they want to stay involved. Right thru their years at a university if they wish to.  Each year, new students join from the elementary school grades.  The resources of CLEAN, and assistance from the CLEAN Network have always been touchstones in our work.

    I've gone on much too long already.  So maybe later, I'll come back to the whole other place-based component: our teams and communities in California. Science festivals, field trip hubs conferences, mass scale community events and in the schools.  And why it is no accident that most of our presenters are people of color.

    Perhaps I'll leave you,for now, with an introduction to the coast-to-coast element. The link to Abigail's video last year for the STEM for All Video Showcase.  Where you will also meet one of our leading STEM lab educators, Sean Bovell:

    https://stemforall2021.videohall.com/presentati...

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    LaShawnda Lindsay
    Remy Dou
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: LaShawnda Lindsay

    LaShawnda Lindsay

    Facilitator
    Research Scientist
    May 16, 2022 | 11:56 a.m.

    Wow! It sounds like your team is doing amazing and important work.  The simple fact that your students remained engaged throughout their academic careers speaks volumes!. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Harrison Pinckney

    Harrison Pinckney

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 11:16 p.m.

    Abigail, your narrative is very compelling. The project itself brings many positive features together. First, connecting the challenges surrounding the climate to the local community is worth noting. For many students, science is viewed as something that takes place in a lab with no meaningful connection to their current reality. You directly disrupt this perception with this project. Mobilizing communities and partnering with federal agencies are additional bonuses. The most impactful component of this project is the manner in which youth are taking the lead in investigating the source of climate challenges and communicating their findings. Overall, this is a great concept.

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Gina Fiorile

    Gina Fiorile

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 13, 2022 | 11:38 a.m.

    This is a great point! Thank you so much for watching our video. Abigail and team are fantastic.

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Abigail Stark

    Abigail Stark

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Producer and STEM Instructor
    May 13, 2022 | 04:47 p.m.

    Exactly the point we want to make! On top of that, science is often difficult to understand, or at least it’s presented in a way not accessible to the general public, much less to students. It’s another language altogether, and when you are fluent in that language and are so used to talking about these topics in that language, it is difficult to convey those ideas in general terms. But people can understand this. It all comes down to accessible language. 

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gina Fiorile
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Russanne Low

    Russanne Low

    Researcher
    May 12, 2022 | 02:39 p.m.

    I have been a CLEAN fan since the inception of the project, and I am so delighted to see this video showing the value that this educational resource for our science education community provides. I am currently working at the Federal University of Paraná, in Curitiba, Brazil, supporting the development of a citizen science program for student learners. I am sharing  both this video and the CLEAN collection with the scientist teams I am working with on this project, as one of the 10 protocols will engage students in energy use monitoring and carbon footprint data collection. Keep up the great work, CLEAN team and thanks for the great video I can share!

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • Icon for: Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Co-Presenter
    Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
    May 12, 2022 | 03:08 p.m.

    Thank you, Russanne! We very much appreciate people like you helping to spread the word about CLEAN. Your current position sounds neat and I'm glad you are able to bring citizen science to student learners in Brazil and that the CLEAN videos are useful for you. We also appreciate that you have reviewed resources for CLEAN - if you are a scientist or educator, please consider becoming a CLEAN reviewer.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 12:55 a.m.

    WOW!  This video is impressive!  The content and the presentation -- the social action of this team is so valuable.  And the clear learning -- by pitching in!  With energy and knowledge like this, maybe the world will be ok.  I voted for your video.  Barbara

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
    Gina Fiorile
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 13, 2022 | 06:49 a.m.

    Barbara,  Your videos have had a profound influence on us.  We have consciously, and quite deliberately, been learning from you and your team. For many years. Which means drawing from the essential wisdom of the Mexican and Indigenous cultural heritage your programs are discussing.  Our desire is to ourselves Learn by Observing and Pitching In (practicing LOPI). That is precisely what we elder volunteers encourage and allow our younger volunteers to do -- in regards to climate action, social justice and STEM education.  How we always work together as a multi-generational team. I think of our students as young colleagues in making a better world.

    I say your videos in plural as we would like to consider ourselves a part of your family, or village. Your culture is our culture. Your way has become our way. On purpose.

    https://stemforall2022.videohall.com/presentati...

    https://stemforall2021.videohall.com/presentati...

    https://stemforall2020.videohall.com/presentati...

    https://stemforall2019.videohall.com/presentati...

    We too, in turn, enthusiastically vote for your videos. Always. Further, we live what your team encourages. Learning by Observation and Pitching In (#LOPI) is now what we are all about at the Mobile Climate Science Labs, ClimateChangeEducation.org and Lowell School. It is how Abigail Stark relates to others in our (her) teams.

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    Barbara Rogoff
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Gina Fiorile

    Gina Fiorile

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 13, 2022 | 11:37 a.m.

    Thank you Barbara! We appreciate it.

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 04:50 p.m.

    Wow! Thank you James for that amazing comment, and for your amazing work!  (And for your support of our videos...)  I'm so glad to know about your team's work. Barbara

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • Icon for: Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Co-Presenter
    Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
    May 16, 2022 | 11:15 a.m.

    Thank you, Barbara! I'm glad our work connected here - thanks for your support of our video and I'm glad we can support your videos as well.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 10:18 a.m.

    Abigail, thank you for the inspiration you provide in this wonderful video! I echo Barbara that the energy, knowledge, advocacy and social action you all have been engaged in gives me hope that the tide is turning towards effective climate mitigation.  I'm curious about the trajectories of students who have participated in such an empowering experience. How do you see your future career in science and activism unfolding over the next few years? What do you and your peers in the project dream about doing next?

     
    4
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
    Gina Fiorile
  • Icon for: Abigail Stark

    Abigail Stark

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Producer and STEM Instructor
    May 13, 2022 | 04:55 p.m.

    I’ve since left the school where this is based. I’m a freshman in high school and many of the people still working with CLEAN resources are in middle school, but I have heard amazing things. So many of them are taking excellent initiative and I’m really blown away by their dedication and passion. The interest around this has taken it from a club to an actual class. As for my career, I want to continue to work on energy surveys and get people interested in them. It’s an excellent way to introduce people to climate solutions. A (fairly nebulous) end goal at this point would be to overhaul the lights in the Capital Building, although we won’t be getting a good look at the inside of it anytime soon. Thank you so much for your questions!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 05:02 p.m.

    Yes, we've also found that getting people interested in taking action to save energy is a good way to begin a conversation about climate change.

    Good luck with your goal with regard to the Capitol - who knows, you may be able to persuade the powers that be to let you do an audit. I would not be surprised if you did!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 13, 2022 | 07:06 p.m.

    Gilly, I think you'll love this.  About the Capitol Building specifically:

    Regarding the inside: Abigail and the students have a standing invitation to do surveys inside the Capitol -- especially of the House side.  I have met with officers of the US Capitol Police.  (Yes, the heroes on January 6th, who defended the Capitol and the electoral process.  One and the same.)  One of the Lowell students and her mom also talked with one of our friends at USCPD. Two officers will provide personal tours inside to Climate Club DC students -- while the students  have SWIR camcorders in hand.  Tours are just now coming back.  We will be inside soon!

    Perhaps the results can be a subject of our next video Showcase video.  Innovate to Mitigate teams are absolutely welcome to benefit on this.  There is plenty of room for further innovation, and true independent creativity.

    Regarding doing a survey from the outside.  Footage already taken!!  Over the summer, Mobile Climate Science Labs teams will be processing and analyzing the images we've already collected. Making split screen images, for example.  This includes the use of spectrum analyzers based on diffraction gratings. 

    Abigail was part of our daytime scouting and daytime reference photography. Others of us were out until 2am getting night time shots. (The police keep a protective eye out of us -- looking out for our safety. Loving to look at the shots we've just captured. Very supportive.)

    We have survey images of all the major buildings on Capitol Hill. We know which (as in whose) offices of the Supreme Court are still hold outs with incandescent lighting. (Government waste in plain sight, if you have the right cameras.) 

    For the surveys, we are using short-wavelength infrared, which can see right through windows. We are very respectful of privacy.  The Capitol Building, however, is being photographed almost constantly by interested visitors, so a chandelier or sconce light inside a room is totally fair game.  Not intrusive. (Note: if we were using our long-wavelength thermal infrared cameras, they would not be able to see inside.  Due to the greenhouse effect.  Glass absorbs and blocks long wavelength light/energy, of course.  Climate science 101.)

    Hint on one of the results we will be reporting -- publicly and to our friends at the Architect of the Capitol:  The lights at the very top of the Capitol are still incandescent!!  They can be changed to LED with little trouble -- technically at least.  These lights are known as the Tholos Lights.  They are turned on only when congress is in session. They indicate when either or both the senate and house are in session.  Visible from almost anywhere in DC. 

    That's an example of a perfect subject for the teams to report on. Both symbolic and of real energy savings significance. Made possible by a STEM innovation pioneered by Abigail and her posse. 

    The electricians and maintenance crews of the Architect of the Capitol ( its own department in the US government) are very busy converting to LED's. Yea, AOC! (as they are known in DC)   Our students are helping them by finding the lights they have missed.  No surprise, with so many light fixtures, a lot get missed.

    We also are documenting the historic transition to much more efficient lighting -- right on Capitol Hill.  The students' cameras dramatically and beautifully reveal that which is not visible to the naked eye.

    Question for Abigail:  Should we keep Gilly and Santi up to date on major milestones of our energy efficiency surveys and historic documentation of progress on Capitol Hill?

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 13, 2022 | 11:18 a.m.

    Gillian: Climate Club DC is meeting in just a few hours (at Lowell Middle School). Abigail and Antonia, among the high school students in the 9th grade, will be seeing your message when they get off of school later today.  Let's see which wants to field this one. 

    Abigail is the spokeswoman.  She is a natural promoter of #LOPI, however, so never wants to eclipse the others. Noemi, Luca, Elvy, Isabel and Kepler are among those who are not shy. 

    They each communicate well.  Including when meeting with the directors of the Smithsonian National Museums about energy efficiency findings and recommendations.

    OK to speak up here Climate Club!  You are among friends and supportive colleagues. STEM educators and leader-practitioners include middle and high school students. The Showcase wants to hear from you!

     

    (Thank you, Gilly!)

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 11:25 a.m.

    I look forward to hearing from them, thank you Jim!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Remy Dou
    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 04:31 p.m.

    This is a fantastic video and a real tribute to all of the educators who have pulled together resources for the CLEAN network that educate and inspire true positive change in our world. Congratulations to Abigail, Anne, Katie, James, Gina, Liz, and Anne! How do you think others can this video to encourage other youth to 'join the fight'?

     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gina Fiorile
    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
    James Callahan
  • May 13, 2022 | 05:00 p.m.

    At TERC, we're also proud of Tamara Ledley, the NSF grantee who co-founded and was the Chair of the CLEAN  Network at its inception.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • Icon for: Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd

    Co-Presenter
    Education & Outreach Associate/CLEAN Program Manager
    May 16, 2022 | 11:21 a.m.

    Thank you, John! And thank you Gillian for mentioning Tamara & TERC who were integral to the development of CLEAN. Tamara is still part of the CLEAN Leadership and does work with CLEAN such as hosting webinars for educators.

    There are many ways to encourage youth to join climate action. There are youth summits (such as those developed by the Wild Center), encouraging students to discuss climate & sustainability with their administrations and school boards, doing energy surveys such as the Climate Club DC does, and speaking with local emergency managers about resiliency and mitigation/adaptation efforts. We host the CLEAN Network, which is a space in which educators and educator supporters can come together and discuss these ideas for how to encourage youth to engage in climate change action. I'd encourage you to join: https://cleanet.org/clean/community/index.html

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • May 16, 2022 | 11:37 a.m.

    Hi Katie - I'm already a member, but thanks for the invitation!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kathryn (Katie) Boyd
  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Lead Presenter
    Network Member, Lab Director, Education and Student Teams Mentor
    May 17, 2022 | 07:57 p.m.

    One of the great pleasures of the STEM for All Showcase is staying in touch, and collaborating with, many of the incredible programs the showcase brings together.  Keeping each other updated, participating in the showcase monthly themed webinars.  Most of all, practically working together throughout the year.

    Innovate to Mitigate and Learning by Observation and Pitching In are two such examples. Outstanding.  We have so much in common.

    Even during the eight days of the showcase, wonderful developments take place.  Two examples for us:

    1.) The third of the mass scale STEM Festivals (festivals) this Spring just took place in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Held in a very COVID aware and cautious way -- yet in person, for the first time after two years.  North Bay Science Discovery Day.

    2.) Bringing to California the innovation pioneered by Abigail, Antonia, Luca, Noemi, Isabel, Elvy and all the team members in DC and Maryland: At the 2022 Earth Day event hosted by the City of Fremont (at the North end of Silicon Valley), we met a director of the BART system at our booth.  (BART: the Bay Area's regional subway, rapid transit/train system)

    She just wrote us that we are on.  The BART system will be utilizing the talents of our California middle and high school students to take action on climate change.  Their energy efficiency surveys and progress documentation in infrared video will indeed be very valuable as the lighting is upgraded at several stations.  Making the system more energy efficient.

    We will be partnering with one of the world's largest manufacturers and innovative R&D labs of energy efficiency lighting.  Whose products will be employed in the energy retrofits.

    Young women of color, themselves STEM experts, working alongside older professionals for practical STEM-based climate action.  (Young people of all gender identities as well, of course.)

    Our teams are so at home, and so proud to take part in the amazing, absolutely wonderful STEM for All Video Showcase.

    Thank you Showcase organizers!  Thank you, CLEAN!  Thank you fellow presenters!  Thank you visitors.  Everyone here!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Callahan
  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

Multiplex Discussion
  • Members may log in to post to this discussion.