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  1. Sheryl Burgstahler
  2. https://sites.uw.edu/sherylb/
  3. Director, DO-IT and Accessible Technology Services
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. UW Center for Neurotechnology
  1. Scott Bellman
  2. Manager, DO-IT Center
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Washington
  1. Eric Chudler
  2. Executive Director/Research Associate Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. UW Center for Neurotechnology
  1. Rajesh Rao
  2. Hwang Professor of CSE/ECE, CNT Co-Director
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. UW Center for Neurotechnology, University of Washington

AccessERC / Center for Neurotechnology

NSF Awards: 1028725

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 9-12, Undergraduate, Graduate

Engineering Research Centers (ERC) of the National Science Foundation (NSF) integrate engineering research and education with technological innovation to transform national prosperity, health, and security. As increasing numbers of people with disabilities participate in academic opportunities and careers, the accessibility of courses, labs, electronic resources, events, internships, and other ERC activities and resources increases in importance. The goal is simply equal access; everyone who qualifies to use ERC resources or participate in sponsored activities should be able to do so comfortably and efficiently. This video describes myriad ways that NSF-funded Engineering Research Centers and similar engineering projects and centers can increase accessibility for individuals with disabilities. Activities are led by a project called AccessERC. Outcomes benefit society by increasing the participation of people with disabilities in education and careers in engineering and improving engineering fields with their unique perspectives and expertise.

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (10 posts)
  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Lead Presenter
    Director, DO-IT and Accessible Technology Services
    May 10, 2021 | 01:59 p.m.

    We are always looking for ways to make Engineering Research Centers nationwide more accessible to and inclusive of individuals with disabilities—in trainings, presentations, research and other Center activities—and to make sure websites and other Center resources are fully accessible to people with disabilities as well. Let us know other useful content you would like us to include in the next version of our publication Universal Design of Your Engineering Research Center

    .

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 12:59 p.m.

    Thank you for identifying the multiple ways that universal design principles must be enacted to improve accessibility--through websites, event plans, physical space (including furniture), and assistive technologies/devices. I think the video made an important connection between the broad goal of the Centers, to use engineering design to solve problems that impact society, and the valuable contributions that can come from people with disabilities when the Centers are inclusive and accessible.   

    I wonder, how are you studying/documenting changes that are made in Centers and what are the indicators that suggest there is sustainable change?  

  • Icon for: Scott Bellman

    Scott Bellman

    Co-Presenter
    Manager, DO-IT Center
    May 11, 2021 | 05:51 p.m.

    Karen, Each Center works fairly independently on documenting changes and addressing sustainable change. There are about 14 Centers currently operating. The NSF has developed a data tracking system called ERC-Web that tracks the participation of underrepresented groups, including individuals with disabilities, in Engineering Research Centers. There is also an organization called the ERC Association, which hosts a library and publishes a best practices manual, diversity opportunities, and data.

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 02:11 p.m.

    Thank you, Scott.  I finally had a chance to click on the links and learn more about the ERCs and the Association.  It makes sense, of course, that each would set goals and document the extent to which they influence changes in participation, support, and other outcomes, I expect. I've seen some of the NSF reports in past years.  Guidance from DO-IT is invaluable!  Appreciate the information.

  • Icon for: Kayla Brown

    Kayla Brown

    May 11, 2021 | 05:39 p.m.

    It's great to see disability being added to the conversation in terms of broadening participation. So many people will benefit from these practices, and the field, as a whole, will be better for it. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Teon Edwards
  • Icon for: Eric Pyle

    Eric Pyle

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 12, 2021 | 09:32 a.m.

    Thank you for the very clear message that a narrowed focus on diversity produces a narrowed outcome.  The broad considerations for research centers are well represented here.  Of particular importance is the message to potential STEM students with disabilities that barriers to participation and learning can be overcome with mindful dialogue and attention to detail.  The International Association for Geoscience Diversity (IAGD) is an organization with similar goals, and to the extent that the conversation can be broadened with such similar groups, the better off we all are as a result.

  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Lead Presenter
    Director, DO-IT and Accessible Technology Services
    May 12, 2021 | 10:36 a.m.

    Yes, it is important that we all spread the word! Accessibility is something that should be addressed in all STEM offerings.

  • Icon for: John Coleman

    John Coleman

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2021 | 12:56 p.m.

    Thank you for your work that focuses on  making resources available to students with disabilities.  Sometimes we focus so intensively on our own areas on interest, and don’t necessarily focus sufficient time or resources to ensure that all students who are interested in our work have access to it.  I have downloaded your resource material as a resource that we can use in the future.

  • Icon for: Scott Bellman

    Scott Bellman

    Co-Presenter
    Manager, DO-IT Center
     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Lina Mallerly Corredor
  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Lead Presenter
    Director, DO-IT and Accessible Technology Services
    May 14, 2021 | 08:46 a.m.

    I'm glad you find our resources useful. We encounter programs focusing on one characteristics - like access to STEM for women and girls, but neglect to make sure that women and girls with disabilities are welcome to engage and can access the content of a website, a video, the curriculum, etc. Included in our roles are to increase awareness in this regard and to provide support and resources to make it happen!

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