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  1. Miyoko Chu
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/pub/miyoko-chu/b/3b2/799
  3. Senior Director of Communications
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  1. Jennifer Borland
  2. https://rockman.com/about/team/jennifer-borland/
  3. Director of Research Programs
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Rockman et al
  1. Charles Eldermire
  2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/celdermire
  3. Bird Cams Project Leader
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  1. Rachael Mady
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachael-mady-38074964/
  3. Bird Cams Lab Project Leader
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  1. Tina PHILLIPS
  2. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/netcommunity/page.aspx?pid=1677
  3. Assistant Director, Center for Engagement in Science and Nature
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cornell University
  1. Claire Quimby
  2. https://rockman.com/about/team/
  3. Research Associate
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Rockman et al
  1. Benjamin Walters
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/benjamin-walters-283461105/
  3. Bird Cams Communication Specialist
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Facilitators’
Choice
Public
Choice

Bird Cams Lab

NSF Awards: 1713225

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Adult learners, Informal / multi-age, All Age Groups

The ubiquity of live streaming, social media, and online collaboration tools presents a new frontier for public participation in science. In recent decades, citizen-science projects have successfully tapped participants as important contributors of data, powering the generation of large-scale data sets used by scientists. However, there is often a siloed division of labor, with participants collecting data and scientists designing the studies, analyzing and interpreting the data, and publishing results.  

Funded by the National Science Foundation, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bird Cams Lab seeks to break down these silos and enable viewers of wildlife cams to  participate in any aspect of the scientific process: asking and selecting questions for investigation, taking part in study design, collecting data, interpreting results, and contributing to final reports.

Watch the video to see what we’ve learned about designing tools and processes to facilitate research co-created by scientists and participants using footage from live and recorded wildlife cams. We also share what we have learned from participants’ experiences.

Bird Cams Lab provides a new model for public participation in science that enables participants and scientists to interact with one another using the immediacy of live-streamed interactions as well as long-term collaboration processes spanning weeks or months. Our findings point to the challenges and opportunities for fostering online scientific collaborations at a time when people are increasingly turning to nature for solace and inspiration, and to online communities for social interaction and volunteerism.

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (42 posts)
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Director of Communications
    May 10, 2021 | 06:09 p.m.

    Welcome to Bird Cams Lab, an online space where participants and scientists co-create scientific investigations and make discoveries using live and archived footage of birds. Bird Cams Lab is now in its final year, funded by NSF. BirdCamsLab.AllAboutBirds.org.

    Questions, comments, or ideas? We would love to hear from you about these or any other topics.

    In co-created investigations, participants engage not just in collecting data for scientists, but in partnering to generate and select questions, help with study design, explore data, and share results.

    • What opportunities are there to increase diversity and inclusion in Bird Cams Lab? So far, participants have been recruited mainly from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bird Cams and Zooniverse, a platform for people-powered research. How might we engage people from more diverse backgrounds, and what approaches are important to consider?
    • What can we learn from other projects with similar challenges? What insights might we gain from other efforts involving co-creation, collaboration in online communities, and increasing diversity & inclusion? What costs or benefits do participants and scientists experience in co-creation, and are there ways to increase benefits across activities? 
    • What are the most exciting or impactful opportunities for co-creation in lifelong learning, and why?
     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Small default profile

    Paula Ford

    May 12, 2021 | 03:17 p.m.

    This is such a great project! As a former educator, I think it would be amazing to publicize the project to get it into "classrooms" (where they exist these days) and to students, especially those doing their schooling online. This would naturally expand interest into more diverse communities; children get excited about the natural world and bring their excitement home to their families. Community naturalist groups would very likely be interested too. Here in Vancouver, BC our local naturalist group has a division dedicated to birds. I will pass on the info to friends here who belong to various local naturalist groups, for starters.                       

    More people watching and studying bird cams can only improve the general public understanding, appreciation and connection to the natural world, which is so sorely needed.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Chip Bruce

    Chip Bruce

    Facilitator
    Professor Emeritus
    May 11, 2021 | 06:52 a.m.

    I want to join in! Can you say more about any indications of participants' insights about scientific thinking extend to other science arenas?

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 11, 2021 | 11:50 a.m.

    Hi Chip, thanks for your question.  We are still analyzing the wealth of qualitative data that speaks to the impacts that the Bird Cams Lab experience has had on participants' thinking about, but there are some quantitative findings that may be relevant.  For example, when comparing pre-post responses for participants in the recently completed "Hawk Happenings" investigation we found greater agreement after participation with the statement "I can make valuable contributions to the scientific study of birds."  Additionally, roughly 70% of participants "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the project taught them about the scientific process in general and, more specifically, about how co-created research projects work. It is also important to note that many of our participants have some background in science--either having worked in a scientific field previously, currently working in a scientific field, having studied science, or currently studying science--so that could be a limiting factor to the types of impacts we've been able to discern from qualitative data thus far. It is interesting to note, however, that people who are no longer working/actively studying science frequently reference the personal value associated with being able to actively contribute to science in a meaningful way. Participants have also noted that their experience tagging/classifying data during the data collection phase of each project has also led them to think more broadly about bird behavior, and move past simply identifying birds to thinking more about (and being more knowledgeable about) bird behavior. Another thing we've heard from several participants is the fact that this project has helped them to better understand the entire scientific process and the great amount of work that goes into an investigation at all stages--not just the data collection stage--and this seems to be fostering a deeper appreciation of the scientific process, even in instances where people consider themselves to be somewhat familiar with/knowledgeable about science.

     

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
  • May 11, 2021 | 07:34 a.m.

    Great project! 

    Do any lesson plan materials exist for K-12 teachers to incorporate Bird Cams Lab into their curriculum? As your participant Thea noted in the video, observing the birds is much more engaging than reading about research in a book. I think K-12 students would really enjoy taking part in the co-created investigations. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
    Benjamin Walters
    Joan Freese
  • Icon for: Benjamin Walters

    Benjamin Walters

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Communication Specialist
    May 11, 2021 | 09:05 a.m.

    Hi Nicole—great question! The Cornell Lab's K-12 Education team has developed lesson plans to utilize the cams in the classroom. You can download these "Life in a Nest" lesson plans here: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/k12/life-in-a-nes...

    These lessons aren't part of the co-created Bird Cams Lab investigations featured in this project, but there is potential in integrating co-created learning opportunities into the classroom in the future. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
  • Icon for: Heather Hopkins

    Heather Hopkins

    Informal Educator
    May 14, 2021 | 08:13 a.m.

    Benjamin thanks for sharing the lesson plan, it is great. There are also ways to incorporate citizen science into the classroom in more informal ways. Nicole, I thought I would share a meaningful experience of mine. I taught 4th grade temporarily for 3 months at an underprivileged school with discipline challenges. We had a campaign to help students identify self-control in their communication and with emotions. I started an emotions check-in session 1-2 times a week that I started with the students watching an eagle nest cam and another involving listening to audio clips of verbal manatee communication. My classroom was full of extremely loud communicators (:P) and I found when I started the viewings, the class would go completely silent and still. I found the students would watch and listen to wildlife behavior and often identify with them on a level that they could relate without me even prompting. Some even gave insight into their family life with observations like, "that manatee sounds as hungry as I was yesterday", or "that crying baby eagle must not know where his daddy is". I wish I had had more time in that position to explore youth emotional connections to nature in the classroom. I know this doesn't relate directly to curriculum but understanding student well-being is vital to classroom management!

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Tina Phillips
  • Icon for: Tina Phillips

    Tina Phillips

    Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 08:27 a.m.

    Hi Heather! Your experience with the cams is so interesting to me. Over the years I have heard of many teachers using the cams as a way to "settle down" students as they enter the classroom, but hearing the expressions from your students as they watch the cams is so eye-opening, especially when they are sharing personal information. I imagine it would take a skilled educator to navigate those conversations in a way that feels safe for everyone.

    We've never really framed the cams as a potential connection to emotional well-being in youth but there is no reason to believe this can't happen. In fact, we hear from many adult participants that the cams bring them solace and joy and even help with depression. As with many NSF projects, we often focus on the outcomes related to science learning and engagement, sometimes at the expense of other equally important outcomes like character development and well-being. Thank you for reminding us that these experiences affect participants in myriad ways and it is our job as researchers and leaders to document and share both the intended and unintended outcomes! 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Joan Freese

    Joan Freese

    Executive Producer, Ready To Learn
    May 11, 2021 | 08:26 a.m.

    I'm curious if you could share the age range of participants. I'm assuming it was open to all, but who showed up? Thanks!

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Benjamin Walters
  • Icon for: Claire Quimby

    Claire Quimby

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 11, 2021 | 02:09 p.m.

    Hi Joan - when we averaged demographics for the different Bird Cams Lab investigations, we found that more than half fall between ages 55-74. While there are some enthusiastic younger birders, people under age 35 account for just 10% of participants.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
    Benjamin Walters
  • Icon for: Benjamin Walters

    Benjamin Walters

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Communication Specialist
    May 11, 2021 | 02:39 p.m.

    These statistics also reflect the demographics of who engages with Bird Cams content on Facebook, as the majority of our engaged audience is above 55. Our other platforms (Instagram, YouTube) reach a higher proportion younger audiences. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
  • Icon for: Nancy Staus

    Nancy Staus

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher, STEM Education
    May 11, 2021 | 10:18 a.m.

    As a former ornithologist, I love how this project gets more people involved and interested in birds! As the project progresses, how will you measure the impact it has on both citizen scientists and the scientists at the Cornell lab? What are your measures of success?

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 11, 2021 | 03:16 p.m.

    Thanks for you question Nancy - I really appreciate the fact that you note the potential not only for impacts on participants within the general public, but also impacts on the scientists involved in the project. Admittedly, the evaluation and research plan for this project was more focused on outcomes among members of lay audiences, however we have anecdotally heard from scientists that this experience has changed the way they are thinking about the design and implementation of investigations--including an openness to more input and valuing the potential contributions that can be made by others. Among members of the lay audiences who participate, we are looking for gains in general and specific knowledge (related to birds and science in general), and changes in behavior (including patterns of programmatic participation and other behaviors related to, but not directly a part of, programmatic experiences). These impacts are being studied through analysis of participation artifacts, through pre- and post-participation surveys, and participant interviews.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Shihadah Saleem

    Shihadah Saleem

    Facilitator
    Sr. Manager of Youth Leadership and Alumni Programs
    May 11, 2021 | 10:35 a.m.

    Very cool video and project, I do like the inclusivity of the approach. In an effort to increase diversity of participants, have you thought about partnering with specific under-served schools to work with teachers and students in a multi-step school-year long project? 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Rachael Mady

    Rachael Mady

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Lab Project Leader
    May 11, 2021 | 04:38 p.m.

    Thanks for your feedback and your idea to increase diversity via partnerships with under-served schools. If we had the chance to test out Bird Cams Lab in a K-12 setting, I think that would be the way to do it. While we focused on tailing Bird Cams Lab to adult informal learners, the research team has repeatedly been excited by the possibilty of Bird Cams Lab in the classroom. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 11, 2021 | 05:23 p.m.

    Thanks for your comments and question Shihadah. While formal educators weren't an official target of this project, we did have the pleasure of speaking with many educators (in both formal and informal settings) who happened to be project participants. From them, we learned that many were making use of bird cams and elements of Bird Cams Lab as part of instructional experiences--not only about birds, but also about the scientific process in general. By incorporating cams into their regular instruction, teachers have been able to foster students' observational skills and facilitate deeper understanding of, and appreciating for, environmental science principles. In short, comments from teachers seem to suggest the potential for more formal in-school use of these resources - and I like the idea of that being a way to broaden participant diversity.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
  • Icon for: Shihadah Saleem

    Shihadah Saleem

    Facilitator
    Sr. Manager of Youth Leadership and Alumni Programs
    May 11, 2021 | 09:04 p.m.

    Thank you Rachael and Jennifer for your responses. When my daughter was in 4th or 5th grade her teacher utilized a bird cam website (I can't remember which one) for students to create, investigate and utilize portions of scientific thinking to learn about specific birds. It was also a great way to get the family involved in bird watching, something I never thought to do as a resident of NYC. It was also lovely to have the live cam on during the holidays and have great conversations about our observations.

     
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    Rachael Mady
    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Claire Quimby

    Claire Quimby

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 12, 2021 | 09:07 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing Shihadah! This project has prompted me to start watching the cams with my own daughter and pay more attention to birds in my neighborhood. I've had the (silly?) revelation that birds are EVERYWHERE once you pay attention, and it's cool that you you can do these observations anywhere. Like you said - even in NYC.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 12, 2021 | 06:22 a.m.

    I'm so glad that you mentioned the multi-generational appeal of the cams, as that's also something we've learned a little about by interviewing Bird Cams Lab participants. One participant that we spoke with indicated that they had gotten their extended family to participate in tagging data during the data collection phase and found that that gave them a common experience to talk about online since they weren't able to all get together face to face during the pandemic. Another participant who'd recently had her elderly mother move into her home explained that her family appreciated the value of having an engaging activity that they could do together with her within the safety of their home while they were quarantining. We also heard from a handful of participants who'd watched cams or tagged data together with younger relatives (grandchildren, nephews, etc.). Anecdotes such as these suggest the potential of the cams to connect family members across different generations and I'm so glad to hear about your family's experiences too.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
    Rachael Mady
  • Icon for: Rita Hagevik

    Rita Hagevik

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2021 | 07:54 a.m.

    That is amazing and what a GREAT use of technologies! Especially during a pandemic. This is a great way to keep science going during a pandemic. Technology certainly has always been and will continue to be an equalizer.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Director of Communications
    May 12, 2021 | 08:42 a.m.

    Thank you for your comment, Rita. Viewership of the cams has risen this year, perhaps related to people being at home more during the pandemic and/or finding the joy and connection with nature during stressful times. Your thought about technology as an equalizer made me reflect on the words of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's director, John Fitzpatrick: "Science is nothing more than organized curiosity." Just by watching cams, people are naturally observing and asking questions, and that has created an accessible starting point for collaboration. Adding online collaboration tools to that has opened up new forms of access to the scientific process for this online community, regardless of where participants are geographically or whether they have access to the outdoors, a university, or other research environment.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Rachael Mady
  • May 12, 2021 | 11:48 a.m.

    Hi and this sounds like a really great project! I love the co-construction of generating research questions and collectively coding data. I had two questions. First, have you considered the potential impacts that this process could have in k-12 contexts? For instance, one of the participants discussed those have been historically left out of the process and I'm wondering how you see this excellent work as potentially impacting similar issues within k-12.

    Next, I see that most of your work was done through the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and you wondered about possibilities for engaging individuals from diverse backgrounds. Have you considered the possibility of reaching out to institutions or organizations, such as science organizations at historically Black colleges & universities (HBCUs) or Hispanic serving institutions (HSIs) and Black Birders Associations? There might be opportunities for collaboration in these kinds of spaces.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Director of Communications
    May 13, 2021 | 08:48 a.m.

    Thanks for your questions and suggestions, Christopher. I would love to see if Bird Cams Lab could work for K-12 classrooms or to understand what would need to be adapted to make projects suitable in those contexts. I imagine it could be a lot of fun, and a new way to experience the process of science, for classrooms to observe a cam together and pick their own questions for investigation, or to collaborate with other classrooms around the country. We also want to seek partners who can collaborate with us to create experiences with Bird Cams that are relevant to their communities; thank you very much for the specific suggestions about HBCUs, HSIs, and Black Birders Associations.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 13, 2021 | 08:59 a.m.

    Thanks for the great comments and recommendations Christopher!  While this project wasn't focused on use in K-12 educational contexts, we did heard from many participants who independently incorporated the cams and aspects of Bird Cams Lab into both formal and informal learning experience with K-12 learners. The outcomes of those efforts suggest a k-12-targed iteration of Bird Cams Lab could be a valuable instructional resource/experience.  

    The team has also brainstormed ways to incorporate more participants form diverse backgrounds (e.g., possibly through connections to groups/organizations (e.g., BlackAFInSTEM and/or Unlikely Hikers) that share interest in STEM and Ornithology. I don't think we'd considered outreach to HBCUs and HSIs. That is a wonderful idea and the recommendation is much appreciated!

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Alexa Sawa

    Alexa Sawa

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2021 | 12:41 p.m.

    Thank you for this project. The more people we have participating in science the better. I found Zooniverse when trying to come up with online labs. Now I have A&P students analyzing microscopic images of monkey blood. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Benjamin Walters

    Benjamin Walters

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Communication Specialist
    May 12, 2021 | 08:28 p.m.

    Thanks for commenting, Alexa! That's awesome. Zooniverse continues to be a platform for all types of discovery, and it has been a pleasure working with their team on various investigations. I'm happy to hear that your utilizing their projects in the classroom. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • May 12, 2021 | 01:55 p.m.

    I loved seeing how you're taking these cameras to the next level.  Curiosity is what drives science, and this project pushes us all forward from this initial curiosity to actual contribution to real science.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Gil

    Jennifer Gil

    Graduate Student
    May 12, 2021 | 03:58 p.m.

    I really enjoy this video! how beautiful are the birds. The participant looks so happy to be able to be part of the research.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 14, 2021 | 08:32 a.m.

    Thanks for your comment Jennifer. Having spoken to dozens of project participants over the lifetime of this project in series of participant interviews, I can attest to people's happiness and enjoyment from this project. As a long-time informal science project evaluator I've often seen engagement, but this is a project where I've seen a consistently high level of passion among participants. This experience has given people a unique opportunity to more fully engage in the scientific process and contribute to scientific discovery - and it has given them something safe and stimulating to do while they've been stuck at home for most of the past year. Thanks again for stopping by to take a look at our video.   

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Shihadah Saleem

    Shihadah Saleem

    Facilitator
    Sr. Manager of Youth Leadership and Alumni Programs
    May 12, 2021 | 07:15 p.m.

    I'm hoping much of these observations can be scientifically documented and useful. Are the scientists/researchers involved able to utilize, save and archive "worthy" observations of participants towards possible longitudinal studies?

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Director of Communications
    May 13, 2021 | 08:57 a.m.

    Thanks for your question, Shihadah! We enable anyone to download the data sets so participants can analyze do further explorations on their own if they wish. Although our project was focused on creating a proof of concept system, there is potential to extend the methods and technology to long-term wildlife cam networks, and if this happened, longitudinal studies could yield some interesting insights over time. For example, participants may log what kinds of prey seabirds or Ospreys are bringing to their nest, indicating how fish populations may be shifting in response to climate change or other factors through the decades.

     
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    Claire Quimby
    Shihadah Saleem
  • Icon for: April Bartnick

    April Bartnick

    K-12 Teacher
    May 13, 2021 | 08:08 a.m.

    What a neat project. Citizen science is such a great way to reach out and get the public involved. I like what Jessica said about people on all levels can come together and have an impact. Accessibility, inclusive education, and activism are what citizen science is all about. Awesome video... thank you!

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Delbert Penner

    Delbert Penner

    May 13, 2021 | 05:30 p.m.

    Nice video. I enjoy taking part in these projects.

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Miyoko Chu

    Miyoko Chu

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Director of Communications
    May 14, 2021 | 08:16 a.m.

    Thank you for contributing, Delbert!

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • May 13, 2021 | 06:36 p.m.

    What a great project! I love how you have been able to break those silos and have people involved in many parts of the scientific process. I want to join in too! 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Benjamin Walters

    Benjamin Walters

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Communication Specialist
    May 14, 2021 | 02:56 p.m.

    Thanks for your comment, Patricia. It has also been interesting to see how participants interact differently with the various stages within an investigation. We've had a number of super contributors that are really invested in the project from beginning to end, and then we have participants that may only be interested in certain aspects, like data collection or question asking. Were excited to dig deeper into these different phases of participation and how they related to learning outcomes during the final evaluation. 

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Meredith Hayes

    Meredith Hayes

    Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 09:23 a.m.

    What an interesting project! Thank you for sharing.  Is there somewhere we could learn more about the instruments you used for surveying participants?

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 14, 2021 | 09:51 a.m.

    We plan to include copies of our instruments along with reporting that is forthcoming this summer. Each set of surveys (administered at the start and end of each co-created research experience) has included questions about participants' behaviors and beliefs related to bird cams, citizen science experiences, and co-created research. The surveys have also incorporated a series of knowledge questions that relate to the specific birds being studied in each investigation as well as questions that explore participants' understanding of the scientific process (e.g., making observations or developing questions that can be answered effectively through scientific investigation). If you email me at jennifer@rockman.com I would also be happy to share survey instruments with you via email.  

     

     
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    Claire Quimby
  • Small default profile

    Deborah Marisi

    May 14, 2021 | 09:26 a.m.

    I think that it is so important for our children to gain awareness of the environmental happenings going on around them.  Let's face it, how many people take for granted this beautiful earth we have been given?  Gaining their interest by making them aware of what happens in bird world during the spring will help engage their interests and aid them in developing an appreciation for our environment.  

     
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  • Icon for: Jennifer Borland

    Jennifer Borland

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research Programs
    May 14, 2021 | 09:42 a.m.

    That's a great point. Many participants have commented on the important role that studying birds via bird cam investigations can have on people's appreciation for nature. Additionally, many participants have noted the ability of these investigative experiences to help people understand the impacts of environmental changes on wildlife - which can, in turn, foster greater interest in environmental stewardship. Many participants have also noted that they have moved beyond an interest in merely identifying different types of birds to being more knowledgeable and interested in bird behavior.  When they watch their own feeders or see birds elsewhere, they are more inclined to observe the types of things that the birds are doing - and have more knowledge with which to interpret some of the behaviors they are seeing.  So yes, in short, this experience does seem to have impacts on participants' understanding and appreciation for birds and the environments we share with them.  

     
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  • Icon for: Manoj Kumar

    Manoj Kumar

    Researcher
    May 15, 2021 | 07:56 a.m.

    Bird cam project is an eye opener for many including me. 

    In my opinion it is a great idea and we should expand it to other continents where ever it is possible.

    I regularly watch these cams , specifically of that of Californian condor,  albatross, feeder cam at cornell, osprey and panama feeder cam.

    By seeing all these we come to know the intricacies of breeding life of these birds. 

    Is there any way by which we can also involve with it and install such cams in our University campus during breeding seasons of birds here in Northern India for research purposes.  

     
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  • Icon for: Charles Eldermire

    Charles Eldermire

    Co-Presenter
    Bird Cams Project Leader
    May 18, 2021 | 02:21 p.m.

    Hello Manoj—

    Thanks for your enthusiasm! We can send along some general information about how we go about setting up our livestreaming cameras and some things to keep in mind—please send an inquiry to birdcams@cornell.edu and we'll reply. Thanks again!

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