428 Views
  1. Pauline Lake
  2. Curriculum and Professional Development Coordinator
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Southwest Minnesota State University
  1. Renee Fall
  2. Senior Research Scholar
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. College of St. Scholastica
  1. Seth Freeman
  2. Chair, Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Capital Community College, ECEP
  1. Ryan Lindsay
  2. Mobile CSP through CE Master Teacher for MN
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. St. Louis County Schools
  1. Jennifer Rosato
  2. Director
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. College of St. Scholastica
  1. James Veseskis
  2. Computer Science Teacher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Hartford Public Schools

Mobile CSP

NSF Awards: 1837723, 1837112, 1836990, 1836983

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 9-12, Undergraduate

The Mobile Computer Science Principles (Mobile CSP) course is an introduction to Computer Science (CS) in which students learn how to create socially useful mobile apps. Our team has found that the online nature of the course has allowed teachers to transition smoothly to teaching remotely and students have succeeded in learning the material as well as passing the course despite the challenges faced with distance learning. The Mobile CSP team has formed a Research-Practitioner Partnership (RPP) with Concurrent Enrollment (CE) programs at Capital Community College in Hartford, Connecticut and Southwest Minnesota State University in Minnesota and with partner school districts in each state. The CS-Through-CE project tries to identify and capture the barriers to offering AP courses and presents the alternative of offering CS courses for CE credit. The curriculum and professional development for the project is provided by Mobile CSP, an endorsed provider for AP CSP.

This video has had approximately 177 visits by 132 visitors from 69 unique locations. It has been played 56 times.
activity map thumbnail Click to See Activity Worldwide
Map reflects activity with this presentation from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase website, as well as the STEM For All Multiplex website.
Based on periodically updated Google Analytics data. This is intended to show usage trends but may not capture all activity from every visitor.
show more
Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (17 posts)
  • Icon for: Pauline Lake

    Pauline Lake

    Lead Presenter
    Curriculum and Professional Development Coordinator
    May 10, 2021 | 05:18 p.m.

    Hi everyone! My name is Pauline Lake. I am the Curriculum and PD Coordinator for the National Center for Computer Science Education where I work with the Mobile CSP program. Our Mobile CSP Concurrent Enrollment (CE) team is excited to share our project with you! Concurrent enrollment (CE) courses are college-level classes offered within high schools and taught by qualified high school teachers in association with a local community college or university. Sometimes they are also referred to as dual enrollment or college-in-the-schools programs. Our team looks at CE courses as an alternative to Advanced Placement (AP) courses. The Mobile CSP CE project aims to 

    • Adapt Mobile CSP curriculum and professional development for CE programs
    • Engage administrators, teachers, and counselors in equity-focused practices to broaden participation in CS
    • Identify and address barriers to implementing CS Principles as a CE course

    This year we focused on capturing student voices on how they prevailed with Mobile CSP despite facing challenges with remote learning. If you have questions, ideas, or even feel that we have similar interests, please leave us a comment!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Alexis Wyss
  • Icon for: Renee Fall

    Renee Fall

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scholar
    May 10, 2021 | 06:07 p.m.

    Thanks, Pauline. I love hearing the voices of these students and am so glad they were able to persist, with the help of their teachers and the Mobile CSP curriculum, and succeed in earning college credit in spite of the upheaval of the 2019-20 school closures and remote learning due to the pandemic.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Alexis Wyss
  • Icon for: Aman Yadav

    Aman Yadav

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 11, 2021 | 08:35 a.m.

    Great to see how you were able to adapt to the pandemic and support teachers/students to learn CS. What are some things that you learned/developed during the pandemic that you will continue to use in the future to support teachers/students? 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Alexis Wyss
  • May 11, 2021 | 04:52 p.m.

    I also have this question!  Also, I'm wondering if teachers used the material differently (more or less individual flair?) due to the pandemic and their teaching circumstances over the year. 

  • Icon for: Ryan Lindsay

    Ryan Lindsay

    Co-Presenter
    Mobile CSP through CE Master Teacher for MN
    May 11, 2021 | 05:03 p.m.

    This course did not really change for me due to the pandemic. Pair programming and group work took a little bit of figuring out, but this course was basically "keep doing what we do". For the new cohort of teachers trained over the summer, they learned the course in a distance environment, which transitioned well to their classrooms without any change really other than adjusting to schedules of school buildings and such.

    I think the biggest change was developing norms for a zoom environment for students, but that was across all classes and this curriculum really was as seamless as possible for the transition. The course was already completely online and familiar to students in their home environments. 

  • Icon for: Ryan Lindsay

    Ryan Lindsay

    Co-Presenter
    Mobile CSP through CE Master Teacher for MN
    May 11, 2021 | 05:06 p.m.

    The biggest thing I will continue to use is the remote operation of a computer in the zoom environment. Student pairs can effectively pair program at home and had a lot of fun doing that.

  • Icon for: James Veseskis

    James Veseskis

    Co-Presenter
    Computer Science Teacher
    May 12, 2021 | 08:28 a.m.

    I ditto Ryan's comments. I really did not change much in the curriculum. The biggest obstacle was trying to sustain teaching in-person and online teaching simultaneously. Or as I like to say, I was a 911 operator and policeman at the same time. I took care of people's issues who were remote and with me in person. It was not always effective. Especially when school wifi dropped. 

  • Icon for: Renee Fall

    Renee Fall

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scholar
    May 13, 2021 | 04:46 p.m.

    Other teachers I have interviewed as part of the research side of this project have also noted that they did not have to change much, as the curriculum and teacher resources exist in an online platform so could easily shift formats. For some, getting students engaged in collaborative work while they were learning remotely was challenging. Others, like Jim, were faced with having to teach students live in the classroom while simultaneously live-casting to students learning from home. (I don't think any would recommend continuing that mode.) For a few, they had to adapt the pacing to fit in all the content due to some school closures or reduced instructional time. But the Mobile CSP curriculum allows for flexibility when the teacher needs that.

  • Icon for: NATHAN KIMBALL

    NATHAN KIMBALL

    Facilitator
    Curriculum Developer
    May 13, 2021 | 05:38 p.m.

    Ryan noted above that at least some of the students worked in pair programming or groups. I have a personal interesting in collaboration, so I'm curious about how this worked remotely. Unless I've misunderstood, this occurred over zoom or some similar technology. Were there zoom break out rooms, or did students arrange their own collaborations? When pair programming did they have a shared working (programming) environment? I realize that it is getting into the weeds, but it is of interest.

  • Icon for: Ryan Lindsay

    Ryan Lindsay

    Co-Presenter
    Mobile CSP through CE Master Teacher for MN
    May 13, 2021 | 09:48 p.m.

    In zoom, the students figured out you can give control of the screen to someone viewing. They then could have app inventor open on one computer, but then take turns in the operator seat. The students just worked off of one person's app inventor account. The students passed on the knowledge to others and we also did this for robotics after school, as the main programmer was distance. I am at a small school, so only 8 in the class. I think it worked in breakout rooms, but the students also just set up their own zoom meetings. Groups were generally 2 or 3 rotating every 5 minutes or so.

  • Icon for: Beryl Hoffman

    Beryl Hoffman

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2021 | 06:08 p.m.

    Awesome video showing Mobile CSP students and their projects! And kudos to all the teachers this year!

  • Icon for: NATHAN KIMBALL

    NATHAN KIMBALL

    Facilitator
    Curriculum Developer
    May 12, 2021 | 11:45 a.m.

    How exciting to see this bridge between HS and collegiate CS education and the partnerships that you have developed. I loved seeing the students telling their stories of coping with remote learning. I'm curious if the outcomes of this remote experience will influence future work, remote or otherwise. And also, what did you learn that you might like to change in the future?

  • Icon for: Renee Fall

    Renee Fall

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scholar
    May 13, 2021 | 04:53 p.m.

    Thanks, Nathan. One of the outcomes we are tracking is students' success in the CSP-CE course, defined as completing the course at the level required for college credit.  Among the 178 students enrolled in 13 schools across 2 states in 2019-20, we saw high percentages of students (81% in one state and 95% in the other) successfully complete the course. This show us that, even in challenging circumstances, high school students (with trained and dedicated teachers) can succeed in college CS coursework, even without having to go to a college campus.  In fact, students in the CSP-CE classrooms completed this course at a slightly higher rate than the AP CSP students in the same states passed the AP CSP exam!

  • Icon for: NATHAN KIMBALL

    NATHAN KIMBALL

    Facilitator
    Curriculum Developer
    May 13, 2021 | 05:29 p.m.

    Thanks for your response, Renee. Those are impressive statistics. 

  • May 14, 2021 | 11:52 a.m.

    I loved elevating the voice of the students in this video and the project overall. Have you been able do any longitudinal studies and if so might you be able to see differences associated with cohorts engaged pre- and during Covid years

  • Icon for: Renee Fall

    Renee Fall

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scholar
    May 14, 2021 | 12:46 p.m.

    Hi Alan - that's a good question. For this project, our first year of piloting this version of the course was 2019-20, so not pre-pandemic. We do intend to look at the college-going of these students, but that's the extent of longitudinal research for now.  Your question makes me wonder if we might analyze data from previous years' student surveys and compare them to the COVID years, looking for any major differences.  I'll ask my colleagues.

  • Icon for: David Lockett

    David Lockett

    Facilitator
    Albert Einstein Fellow
    May 14, 2021 | 02:09 p.m.



    Amazing project! The pair programming and group work looks really interesting and rewarding. Have you made any changes to the mobile CSP curriculum as the project progressed? 




     

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

Multiplex Discussion
  • Members may log in to post to this discussion.