837 Views
  1. Seema Rivera
  2. Assistant Professor of STEM Education
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Clarkson University
  1. Jan DeWaters
  2. Associate Professor STEM Ed/Engineering
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Clarkson University
  1. Ben Galluzzo
  2. https://www.clarkson.edu/people/benjamin-galluzzo
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Clarkson University
  1. Katie Kavanagh
  2. Professor of Mathematics
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Clarkson University
  1. Michael Ramsdell
  2. Associate Professor of Physics
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Clarkson University

STEM Up NY

NSF Awards: 1852820

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 9-12, Graduate

This video from Clarkson University's Noyce Program (STEM Up NY) will share how our math and science preservice teacher-scholars addressed equity and adapted to teaching during the time of COVID.  Our scholars are secondary preservice math and science teachers and complete a one-year residency in the same secondary school for the duration of the year. The STEM Up NY MAT model will also be shared.

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (13 posts)
  • Icon for: Seema Rivera

    Seema Rivera

    Lead Presenter
    Assistant Professor of STEM Education
    May 10, 2021 | 11:18 p.m.

    Hi Everyone, I'm Seema Rivera, the PI for Clarkson University's first Noyce Program!  We are just finishing up our second year of a 5-year program.  Our program covers senior year and the Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) year.  We are investigating how to prepare science and math preservice teachers to be culturally competent to teach in both rural and urban schools.  We certify in secondary math, physics, chemistry, biology, earth science, technology, and computer science.

     

    I look forward to your comments and questions!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Catherine Horn
    Meghan Marrero
  • Icon for: Pendred Noyce

    Pendred Noyce

    Founder and Executive Director
    May 11, 2021 | 02:01 p.m.

    Great work! (I'm always touched by Noyce Scholars programs since they are named after my father.) I'm intrigued by what the young scholars have to say about teaching remotely, how to keep kids active and engaged. I recommend the book Ten Big Bets by my friend Gil Noam as a thought-provoking guide to rethinking school after COVID. Also, based on my own interests, a question: do you give any thought to including literature in science class? Or writing? And to what extent do the scholars try include personal and societal concerns and decision-making with the young people they are teaching?

     

     
    5
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cathy Lussier
    Lisa Lamb
    Catherine Horn
    Meghan Marrero
    Seema Rivera
  • Icon for: Seema Rivera

    Seema Rivera

    Lead Presenter
    Assistant Professor of STEM Education
    May 11, 2021 | 05:35 p.m.

    Thank you, Pendred, I will check that book out!  Yes, one of our students this year used literature and stories to teach science, we have not done as much with writing but I think that is something we need to focus on.  Being able to communicate work, regardless of the discipline, is key so I will definitely be looking into that more in the future (writing/communication in stem).  I think the nature of science aspects you touched upon (the person and societal concerns) is a great way to engage students in stem...I hope our scholars continue to build on what they have learned so far with regard to the nature of science.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Catherine Horn
  • Icon for: Meghan Marrero

    Meghan Marrero

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2021 | 09:50 p.m.

    Great video, Seema! For me, I think that leaning on culturally relevant pedagogies will help novice teachers to meet the needs of their learners, regardless of the context.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Seema Rivera
  • Icon for: Christine Royce

    Christine Royce

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 12, 2021 | 04:10 p.m.

    Nice job Clarkson University! - The transition to digital online teaching was challenging for experienced teachers and I am sure the preservice teachers in your program as well.  It sounds as if there were many different adaptations that were made ranging from the type of digital tools used to the structure of the class period that was offered.  How had technology and the use of these digital tools been incorporated into coursework pre-pandemic?  Have any decisions related to future coursework or focus been discussed yet to include tools such as these if they weren't previously part of the program?

    Christine

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Catherine Horn
  • Icon for: Catherine Horn

    Catherine Horn

    Facilitator
    Moores Professor and Chair
    May 12, 2021 | 04:52 p.m.

    Thanks, so much, for the great introduction to your program! The video left me with several wonderings. I loved that one of the participants described the needed approach to thinking/rethinking instruction during the pandemic as "approaching it like a science project." Great and positive reframe! Building on Christine's question, what have you learned throughout this year that you see as critical to success that has changed the ways in which you think about successful teaching and learning? 

    I also wonder, in a different aspect of the program, how you arrive at the action research areas of focus. Are these collaboratively identified or predetermined based on instructional goals? Finally, I'd love to know more about the characteristics and process you use to identify "highly qualified" mentor teachers. 

    Appreciate your work!

    cathy

  • Icon for: Jill Berg

    Jill Berg

    Facilitator
    Leadership Coach, School Improvement Consultant & Author
    May 12, 2021 | 07:00 p.m.

    This video highlights one of the important ways this pandemic crisis offered an opportunity:  It opened teachers up to trying new practices and offering more choices, especially ones that expanded differentiation through technology.  Next, we should be thinking about how teachers are coaching students to be skillful choice-makers, so that each choice helps them to become effective as independent learners. 

  • Icon for: Audrey Cohan

    Audrey Cohan

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2021 | 11:48 a.m.

    Great work! Thank you for sharing this video and offering examples as to best practices. It was good to hear that your teacher candidates were hired despite the pandemic. How do you recruit your Noyce scholars from under-represented populations? 

  • Icon for: Jan Smith

    Jan Smith

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2021 | 05:42 p.m.

    You have a very similar Noyce focus to ours; we are also targeting rural students who want to return to their home communities to teach.  This past year has been a very challenging year for teachers; your scholars have shown amazing flexibility, creativity, and adaptability.  If they can get through this year, they can do anything!  

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Seema Rivera
  • Icon for: Audrey Cohan

    Audrey Cohan

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2021 | 09:24 p.m.

    We agree that a "grow your own teacher" approach is a wonderful idea as  candidates return to their home communities. Thanks for sharing and keeping the conversation going! 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Seema Rivera
  • May 17, 2021 | 11:09 a.m.

    Yes! Flexibility, creativity, and culturally responsive engagement are critical factors for our STEM teachers and students, especially this past year. Thank you for pointing out that all the students struggled with extended screen time and engagement during the Pandemic. You and your fellows have undoubtedly done great work! Thanks for sharing.

  • Icon for: Tracey Sulak

    Tracey Sulak

    Researcher
    May 17, 2021 | 12:55 p.m.

    We have a newly-developed MAT but no scholarships offered. Our students typically come from our biology department, but we have not had any luck recruiting them through typical means (large group presentations, town halls, etc). The majority of our candidates come from our iBEARS program where they served as mentors to 4-8th grade students. That is not a very large pool!  Any ideas of how to expand this group without offering scholarships? 

  • Icon for: Cathy Lussier

    Cathy Lussier

    Researcher
    May 18, 2021 | 07:02 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing this video. I really enjoyed hearing from your student scholars. I'm so glad to hear that your teacher candidates were hired despite the pandemic, our Noyce scholars were too. I liked that your student scholars talked about using the physical aspects (whiteboards and the like) to help maintain engagement to adapt during the online drift that seems to happen. That was great that you were able to keep action research still in your study this year despite COVID. 

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