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  1. Chih-Ing Lim
  2. https://fpg.unc.edu/profiles/chih-ing-lim
  3. Senior Technical Assistance Specialist
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. STEM Innovation for Inclusion In Early Education..., UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  1. Jessica Amsbary
  2. Postdoctoral Research Scholar
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, STEM Innovation for Inclusion In Early Education...
  1. Julie Chin
  2. Education Technology Specialist
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute
  1. Christine Harradine
  2. UNC Chapel Hill
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. STEM Innovation for Inclusion In Early Education..., UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute
  1. Megan Vinh
  2. https://fpg.unc.edu/profiles/megan-e-vinh
  3. Advanced Technical Assistance Specialist
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. STEM Innovation for Inclusion In Early Education..., UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  1. Hsiu-Wen Yang
  2. Postdoctoral research associate
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. STEM Innovation for Inclusion In Early Education..., UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

STEM Innovation for Inclusion in Early Education

H327G180006

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades K-6

Research continues to highlight the importance of targeting early STEM learning, suggesting the linkage to later academic gains (Claessens & Engel, 2013; Paprzycki, et al., 2017). However, much of the research on early childhood STEM learning has been focused on typically developing children leading to specific activities and curriculum which may not include adaptations for children with disabilities. Yet, it is critical to include young children with disabilities in STEM learning. In this video, we share why it is important to include young children especially those with disabilities in STEM experiences. We will also share how we are embedding an inclusion framework within early STEM learning trajectories, and identify strategies for adapting early STEM learning to increase accessibility and participation for all learners. 

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (14 posts)
  • Icon for: Chih-Ing Lim

    Chih-Ing Lim

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Technical Assistance Specialist
    May 10, 2021 | 05:19 p.m.

    Thank you for visiting our video! Our Center, the STEM Innovation for Inclusion in Early Education Center (STEMIE, https://stemie.fpg.unc.edu ) is funded by the Office of Special Education Programs, US Department of Education. STEMIE is a partnership between Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Marsico Institute at the University of Denver. Our work is focused on developing the evidence including instructional practices and learning trajectories for science, technology, and engineering, and further refining the well-developed math learning trajectories to ensure all young children (birth to five) especially those with disabilities can engage in early STEM learning opportunities in school and at home. 

    STEM is for all children and holding all children, including children with disabilities, to high-expectations is critical. What are some of your experiences in ensuring equitable STEM learning for all children?

     

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 09:39 a.m.

    Thank you, Chih-lng for this video and for sharing an approach to supporting STEM learning of young children with disabilities. This is important work, offering critical supports for teachers and parents. The platform (or paper materials?) appears to be easy to use and engaging. Having a pictorial-diagram that enables a teacher/parent to see stages within the learning trajectory tied to the overarching goal seems especially helpful. It can be hard to keep to pay attention to facilitate an activity, while also keeping goals in mind.  I appreciated viewing the example interaction with Alaine and her mother, where you pointed out places in which she used verbal and gestural prompts and where she adapted the environment by moving materials. It would be helpful to see how teachers and parents engage, directly with the learning trajectory materials--what do they learn from them, what do the materials help them to think about in terms of where the child it "at" and what to do next to support their exploration and learning?  I know this can't all be covered in a short video, so I would love to hear a bit more description of how you help parents or teachers understand and use the learning trajectory materials. 

    A related research question - are you collecting data on teacher/parent implementation outcomes and/or adult and child growth?  Or maybe you are looking affective changes?  And if so, what are you finding or what do you hope to discover from the data?

    Thank you for helping us consider the STEM teaching and learning needs for young children.

     

  • Icon for: Chih-Ing Lim

    Chih-Ing Lim

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Technical Assistance Specialist
    May 11, 2021 | 02:07 p.m.

    Hi Karen, great questions! We are at the phase where we are finally able to work with our incubator sites to collect the data on what additional implementation supports families, and practitioners (both early intervention home services and classroom-based) need to use the materials, test the progressions we have drafted related to science, technology, and engineering, and learn about the process of how children learn and grow. We are also building on work done by our colleagues at the University of Denver who have developed LTs for math (https://www.learningtrajectories.org). In the meantime, we also have developed some resources for families that they can use within everyday routines and activities: https://stemie.fpg.unc.edu/resources?f%5B0%5D=field_audience%3A12&f%5B1%5D=field_resource_type%3A21 

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 02:15 p.m.

    Thank you!  I took a quick walk through your website to get a sense of what you are sharing, and I have a better understanding of the ways in which you are supporting families.  I'll spend more time there after the Showcase too.  What an excellent resource!

  • Icon for: Christine Harradine

    Christine Harradine

    Co-Presenter
    UNC Chapel Hill
    May 14, 2021 | 02:28 p.m.

    Thank you for engaging with STEMIE, Karen!  We expect to continue adding resources to our website, so please check back often.

  • Icon for: Eric Pyle

    Eric Pyle

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 12, 2021 | 09:41 a.m.

    This is a wonderful presentation - I especially welcome the use of case studies and personalization as presented in the video.  Having worked with teachers to develop such case studies, they offer a broad range of connectivity to other teachers and parents.  They have an especially profound impact on pre-service teachers, who are seeking to build their teaching personae but also deal with their apprehensions of the classroom diversity they are to face.  Building on students' strengths and alternative approaches to instructional presentation are powerful tools for newly-qualified teachers to have on hand.  Can you make any specific suggestions on professional development opportunities for current STEM teachers?

  • Icon for: Chih-Ing Lim

    Chih-Ing Lim

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Technical Assistance Specialist
    May 12, 2021 | 01:56 p.m.

     

    Thank you! Yes, we have found that using case studies and personas are especially important in helping both pre-service and also in-service teachers and other practitioners make connections to real life situations and dilemmas of practice, and also support their ability to make decisions on the selection of evidence-based practices for individualization. We have a free event, STEMIEFest the week of October 4-8 where there are opportunities for the early childhood field to engage in learning (see 2020's archived sessions: https://stemie.fpg.unc.edu/stemiefest . We also have free PD events that are focused on strategies and practices to support children's learning. Here are examples of 2 archived PD events:

    We are also building E-learning PD. So stay tuned! 

  • Icon for: Jessica Amsbary

    Jessica Amsbary

    Co-Presenter
    Postdoctoral Research Scholar
    May 12, 2021 | 05:21 p.m.

    And a PD Event coming up geared towards families but still, PD focused on strategies and practices to support children's learning - You can register on our events page: https://stemie.fpg.unc.edu/events 

  • Icon for: Jessica Amsbary

    Jessica Amsbary

    Co-Presenter
    Postdoctoral Research Scholar
    May 12, 2021 | 05:26 p.m.

    Adding to Chih-Ing's discussion question:

    • What are some challenges you have faced ensuring equity for all children in STEM learning opportunities?
    • Are you familiar with and/or have you used the math learning trajectories? We'd love to hear your thoughts (feedback/strengths/weaknesses/challenges/successes) related to those.
    • What are your ideas related to engaging our youngest learners (birth through five years old) of all abilities in STEM learning opportunities?
  • Icon for: Lindsay Palmer

    Lindsay Palmer

    Graduate Student
    May 14, 2021 | 02:01 p.m.

    It is so wonderful to see programming and research geared toward increasing STEM accessibility for students with disabilities. Great work!

  • Icon for: Christine Harradine

    Christine Harradine

    Co-Presenter
    UNC Chapel Hill
    May 14, 2021 | 02:25 p.m.

    Thank you for visiting, Lindsay!  If you have a chance, we invite you to check out our website for a deeper look into what we do and how we do it.  https://stemie.fpg.unc.edu/

     

  • Icon for: Scott Bellman

    Scott Bellman

    Manager, DO-IT Center
    May 17, 2021 | 11:30 a.m.

     Thanks for sharing your video and website, and for promoting inclusive STEM learning. You have a lot of great events coming up!

  • Icon for: Jessica Amsbary

    Jessica Amsbary

    Co-Presenter
    Postdoctoral Research Scholar
    May 18, 2021 | 07:57 p.m.

    Yes, Scott - we hope to see you at some of them! Please reach out if you'd like and additional info...thank you!

  • Icon for: Jacqueline Ekeoba

    Jacqueline Ekeoba

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2021 | 04:53 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing this video! Exhibiting STEM learning can definitely be exhibited in a variety of different ways. I like the examples provided in your video. 

    I also wanted to invite to view an informal STEM experience done at University of Houston: https://videohall.com/p/2031

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

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