1113 Views
  1. Betsy Stefany
  2. http://www.sabensgrp.com
  3. Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. SABENS Group
  1. Kristina Bishop
  2. Education Evaluation and Research Specialist
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. College of Exploration
  1. Peter Haydock
  2. http://www.gearboxlabs.org
  3. COO
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Gearbox Labs
  1. Michael Kaspar
  2. independent researcher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. DC STEM Alliance
  1. Marilyn Moriarty
  2. Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Hollins University
  1. Bob Riddle
  2. https://bobs-spaces.net
  3. Column Editor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. National Science Teaching Association

AeroKats and Rover Educational Network (AREN)

NNX16AB95A

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

All Age Groups

The video follows volunteers advancing through interest-driven roles to test out and develop site teams.  Their active assistance with the NASA/AREN remote sensing project during the COVID closure models the   structure and aids the construction of site learning "sustainability".  Flooding at Hollins University's Virginia campus attracted the researcher studying the integration of digital tools. The entrepreneurial study students joined environmental interests, uniting the observable water issues requiring varied integration of new digital tool data.  While using the patented NASA.AREN Aeropod, their experience with terms gained inventing knowledge including intellectual property, license agreements and risk management.  Uniting domains in application broadened all perspectives. 

 PreCOVID sensor integration planned to advance through two higher education forms, clubs and course structure, altered with the Covid closure. Broadening digital integration flipped the classroom-based progression to the fields, collecting data as evidence of knowledge advancement and building comparative discussion media for further projects.  Participants adjusted obtaining online certifications, attending varied online courses and joining virtual conferences. 

COVID affected all aspects of support systems, scattering students, closing campus buildings and reducing traditional physical site use.   Critical data collection participants (22 sites in 14 states) advanced the project comparing empty structures and fields to map influences on sites.  The video spans the contrasts and the growth of site roles over the year.    Remote sensing and documenting change increasingly are in the public interest, critical to mitigating and inventing solutions.  The resulting team collaborates to provide views to form this video.  

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (44 posts)
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 11, 2021 | 05:44 a.m.

    Welcome to this year's video introducing views to the challenges of mapping and collecting data in systems changing in hard to predict timing.  Covid shutdown has also offered us time to work as individuals, teams and cohorts with tools in our own locations that gain meaning to our knowledge that's hard to generalize.  

    During this week's discussion, we invite ideas that extend individual interests to sustained local data collection of phenomenon information over time. 

    • Taking this as a given, mapping our local environment is important. What are the priorities of the layers of knowledge as we map our local environment? 
    • Are we missing the local community impact of small changes? How are sensors and their analysis able to inform projects to engage campus and community decisions?
    • And an age old question, that bears asking again, “How can we improve recognition and value the roles involved as we learn the process to document critical systems?” 

    We look forward to reading your experiences working through the year and answering questions regarding our projects.

     
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    Ateng' Ogwel
    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Michael Kaspar

    Michael Kaspar

    Co-Presenter
    independent researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 06:16 a.m.

    Hi, I'm Mike Kaspar.  Welcome to our video presentation. I'm a co-presenter but, I am also a volunteer interested in STEM where each subject of STEM is clearly integrated.  Prior to COVID the focus of this STEM project was building content support for sensor integration at Institutions of Higher Education designing a course support and a club type model(s) with classroom data and website content support. 

    The difficult and fast-evolving COVID closure models changed that project to one in which local residents would be engaged to assist in data collection during the pandemic.  In our case, we were interested in the similarities and differences between an extreme ice event in Texas and one that occurred earlier in New Hampshire. The project became a multi-generational event of quarantined family members.  The high-schooler grandson figured out the sensor, i-phone, and app connections, the grandfather explained the device and process while the daughter re-explained the device and process to the grandson in a way that he could understand. Data was collected and the next steps would be to analyze that data to build our story around these similar yet different events.

    We learned that each individual began with a certain role in mind but that the role changed as the project progressed.  Once every role was more clearly defined, each member learned about the importance of collecting data about one’s environment in a real-to-life situation, especially when all the water pipes had to be replaced. 

     

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 11, 2021 | 10:51 a.m.

    Hi, Mike!

    The full experience of building activities that involve sensors need to ponder the chemistry of group use and meaning to others.  The weather event in Texas saddened and shocked all of us. Hard to be without heat then endure burst pipes, yet the impetus to develop information and apply tools to avoid future damage is a huge leap.  We noticed the data in NH during our annual Nov-January light/temp data collection and were fortunate to have you join to be one of our "southernmost points" for that time period.

    Thanks for discussing your family's engagement with the data loggers.  This type of "cohort group" is the most universal to take on projects during this "COVID closure model" and we can learn from more from your description than we'd ever dare to try from sending you a survey!   

    The change of roles as individuals find their interests appeared to be the most difficult as students obviously are out to figure that out while also finding their way into what appears to be future growth areas or items that will save time/effort.  They tend not to sustain their interest without someone like you or your daughter to reflect...or to assist their progress with the technology.   Taking on an internship or apprenticeships is a large step from volunteering and hard to arrange during the closure situation.   

    The full experience of building activities that involve sensors need to ponder the chemistry of group use and meaning to others.  We had been watching flooding but never could imagine the difficulties that unfolded in Texas.  With more data over seasons and discussions like this we will be able to plan differently for their possible affects.   Should I send down more loggers for summer? 

    I certainly hope we can sustain our efforts!  What comes next?  

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Michael Kaspar

    Michael Kaspar

    Co-Presenter
    independent researcher
    May 17, 2021 | 03:57 p.m.

    I hope we sustain our efforts, too,  Betsy.  

    My grandson, daughter and I have watched other videos together. I don't think it was until they watched them that they realized the scope and breath of STEM projects.  I believe they found even greater meaning in their 'work' in Texas.  This greater understanding, to me, helps to translate to sustainability.  Joe, my grandson, read some of the comments, too.  It was eye-opening for him to think that yes, he could figure out the technology, but he really had to think about what the technology could do.  I think building that bridge is critical and something I'm sure we can all work on.  Now that closure seems to be letting up, it'll be interesting to see what will change back.  In this case, closure brought this intergenerational group together much easier than having to compete with football practice.

    I plan for us to continue to ponder the chemistry of group use and meaning to others.  I hope that we can continue to build understanding of the project over time.  I'm looking forward to more discussions as well.  This all has certainly opened my eyes to some new ways of thinking.  My flow of logic has changed...it must be something in the soil, the changes in light, the atmosphere, the wind, and the water.  

    Comments here, particularly those made by Peter, Bob and Holly, have been interesting and certainly add to my own learning.  I like the questions by the facilitators and visitors, too.  I appreciate this venue and glad I've had the opportunity to participate.

    Yes, more loggers, please.  I look forward to our planning soon.

  • Icon for: Dionne Champion

    Dionne Champion

    Facilitator
    Research Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2021 | 03:53 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing your work. This is a great example of how programs and program goals needed to shift in response to the COVID pandemic. As you move forward into the next phase of your project, do you plan to return to your original project goals? How will you integrate the things you have developed as a result of the COVID detour into those goals? What are the big lessons learned that you will take with you moving forward?

     
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    Michael Kaspar
    Remy Dou
    Peter Haydock
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 12, 2021 | 01:48 p.m.

    Thanks for enabling us to explain the design history of the current project.   The NASA/AREN project participation evolved from a Math and Science Partnership project, STEM Literacy Community of Practice that ended successfully in 2014.  Educators involved were tested through Harvard’s MOSART tests with the results that areas of light(optics/spectrometry), heat transfer and dual variable graph analysis required by current technology integration.  Teachers with the most years from certification needed the most  PD support to embrace STEM.

     The teachers selected pilot tech to help them learn with their students and also document as they learned.  This project-based use of tools solved issues of classroom glare and overheated locations.  The goals were met when, after several years of data collection, they found the problem and had the evidence to correct the situations.  The tools were offered out on loan for others and have continued to extend opportunities to integrate technology to address issues. Our goals are continually based on learning interests and expressed which is part of the design of a “community of practice”. 

    The most difficult is the first stage of learning each type of sensor potential from small project activities.  Last year we expanded  from all interested to set up from Nov-Jan to include summer.  As of today we have at least two “hosts” to keep up the summer comparison projects.

    In looking back to last year, we did not “detour” our goals” but were better able to study roles within the project to engage individuals beyond the classroom which will enhance the learning pathway to add others as colleagues addressing the hard issues of sustainability, material costs and recovery from catastrophes.  These high goals will last us a very long time!

     
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    Remy Dou
    Peter Haydock
  • Icon for: Kristina Bishop

    Kristina Bishop

    Co-Presenter
    Education Evaluation and Research Specialist
    May 11, 2021 | 04:48 p.m.

    Hi! As a researcher it has been exciting to see the intergenerational participation and role definition in this project and it can be a useful model for others to follow, whether during a pandemic or anytime. Also the project's activities cross a number of states and locations and make it particularly useful for comparisons.

     
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    Michael Kaspar
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 12, 2021 | 09:54 a.m.

    Hi, Tina,

      Your suggestion  of using Patton’s Developmental Evaluation when the project started as an MSP.  Attempting to evaluate first teachers with projects then their students gains in a state that had a waver on data collection remains a key decision that aided us to reach everyone “where they are”…but also to interest them in finding their interests.

     

     The opportunity to involve participation from key influencing parts of our project who under normal conditions are involved with long standing programs has carried the interests to reach more youth.  Over the year, the teachers also have formed new cohorts,  including them in their stretch to bring focus to their usual content through local sites.  This change happened just as the project was moving out of the classroom last March.

    Last summer  I was able to access and use tools to map soil moisture, a noted building issue in their town report.  Also to continue to "map" low level winds on their expected NASA/AREN (kite powered)  flyfield and develop data to include in their powerpoints for future use.  They’ve continued to keep all yearlong interior data of their newest “green classroom”.  Together we are building very local content that the area citizens can experience through a variety of communications designs.  We are lucky to have the intergenerational focus in that school so close to us...and the long involvement with the teacher and principal from their positions in other local schools.  

    Thank you for your continued valued observations!

     
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    Michael Kaspar
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Sabrina De Los Santos

    Sabrina De Los Santos

    Facilitator
    Research and Development Associate
    May 12, 2021 | 01:40 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing this timely and important work. In the video, I saw students of different ages involved in the field experiences and I wonder how you adapt them to different ages. Also, did you evaluate the field experiences or do you have plans to collect data about students' experiences in the future?

     
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    Michael Kaspar
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 12, 2021 | 11:59 a.m.

    Sabrina,

       While Tina is engaged with developing further formal evolution of the projects, I am absorbed with the question of “adaption for different age groups”.

    There are multiple inroads to the NASA/AREN program that are explored in the video and through GLOBE's videos in the STEM-for-All discussions.    The normal science classroom is actually the easiest to engage in an “orderly fashion” but most difficult to hit the outdoors,  prepared and with the right conditions.

    To solve that issue, I’ve frequented multiple locations, expanding the use of the Aeropod’s design to carry other sensors which gives the program both data from the locations to compare with the classroom and immediate public interest with direct questions from their own interests.  Both have contributed to improve the project in the classroom.  The actual data from contrasting sites adds the challenge to create the site's info.  

     

      Once out in the field, the equipment receives lots of questions and interest!.  Flying a kite is fairly common in coastal locations, however beach attendees become fascinated by the NASA/AREN developed element that a NASA engineer designed to hold a camera facing down for the pictures that form a visual map of a site in that season.  The sensors add a direct discussion on current conditions of the climate that most ages can understand, especially if they are standing on hot sand!   

     

    Those that assist with the filming, data collection with sensors are referred to USGreen Building Council’s online certification designed for “educators” to consider the use of data within their own building, environment or region.  From USGBC’s early partnership and adding continual sensors we are developing a learning progression where everyone unites yet also is stimulated to create their own projects.

    As the video mentions at the end, the next challenge is communication between projects.  Any suggestions are appreciated!

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Perrin Chick

    Perrin Chick

    STEM Education Specialist
    May 12, 2021 | 09:44 a.m.

    Betsy- Nice to see your project video. I would love to reconnect and learn more about your work. How did you go about recruiting the various schools? And where do you see this work going in the next few years?

    Perrin Cothran Chick

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 12, 2021 | 10:04 a.m.

    Perrin, 

     Thanks for "stopping by"!    It has been a long while since we've updated our views of what we are currently involved in and how they may overlap!  I will stop by your video and catch myself up then back to discuss more.

    Betsy

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 16, 2021 | 01:26 p.m.

    Perrin, 

     Discussing the two issues that you question, 1 recruitment and also the future...the voice of the rural and geographically "underserved" remains critical.  I recall how carefully the initial NSF design to build in teams and "map" their progress started in NH.  The early digital project,  Picturepost where we were both involved  was an award from that start and continued to anchor our sensors' data collection from the digital photo start.   It also mapped out connections.

    That start also developed our concept of sustainability to ensure that all projects extend to recruit through their interests and cohorts that they enjoy working with...and include the youngest into the "teams" and roles.  To ensure the development, we partnered with Journey North which has changed their home ...but not their program.  We outreach their Tulip program, planting in the fall and enjoying sharing the contrasts of emerging and blooms in the spring.  

    We also always have a reading/journaling ongoing sharing and review of emerging media and are headed  to strengthen that important sector of STEM Literacy in the next few years.  

    We are having problems getting our rural sites that have accessed our video to show on our video's map.  They are on the national, but don't appear on ours.  Getting small signs of "being heard" like a point on the map seems small but that type of visual encourages them to take the next step and join with their voice as well as to build a program.   

    What are your ways of recognizing your participants?  Do you develop academic recognition?

    Thanks for sharing,

    Betsy Stefany

  • Icon for: Kristina Bishop

    Kristina Bishop

    Co-Presenter
    Education Evaluation and Research Specialist
    May 12, 2021 | 09:49 a.m.

    Hello Sabrina,

    Thanks for your suggestion about further evaluation. It would be great to gather data about the students' current experiences with this project's field activities. I was the original evaluator under the MSP umbrella for this project, but that has ended. We can see what we might do to secure appropriate funding and make that happen! :)

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Michael Kaspar

    Michael Kaspar

    Co-Presenter
    independent researcher
    May 17, 2021 | 04:14 p.m.

    It would be wonderful if you and Sabrina were able to secure funding.. To gather data about the students' current experiences with this project's field activities. I would like to see what the evaluation tool would look entail.  

  • Icon for: John Moore

    John Moore

    Executive Director
    May 12, 2021 | 01:50 p.m.

    Hi Betsy,

    We share interests in the NASA AREN Project (and we will touch base later for sure). What a great way to not only introduce the topic of remote sensing, but have students participate in the collection of data. It is hard for students to escape what is now almost daily news/reports i.e. about NASA's plans for the ISS, Moon, and Mars. In addition, we face issues such as climate, energy, sustainability etc., where use of remote sensing data is already an established part of the research. I am sure you have seen not only the excitement, but questions that they come to school with. With these initiatives combined with the every developing network of Earth Observing Satellites, the next generation of STEM professionals will view this type of data and imagery as common place in their toolbox. Continue to "Prepare and Inspire"!

     
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    Michael Kaspar
    Remy Dou
    Peter Haydock
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 13, 2021 | 08:25 a.m.

    John,

    Certainly I am glad to see your interest and kind response to our project. We are both advancing through the NASA/AREN engagement.  The “ownership” of data in an activity is important to what we offer to students through their roles in the collection process.  Also that the small and approachable NASA element holds a patent and is respected as “intellectual property”. 

    This expectation excites students as they see the responsibility of the entrepreneurial process in front of them. In the video you can see their interest in discovering the Aeropod and making a decision about flying it with sensors on that particular day. This relates directly to how they watch NASA decide about launches.  As NASA “motors” around Mars and the Moon, the factor of the differences between Earth and other locations comes home to us…literally.   The sensors give us a shared global “language”. 

    The interest in inventing a product seems to be an on going drive with kids as well as some adults! As you express, they want a true “toolbox” and not plastic or drawings or actual tools.  The advantage of our era is that the sensors are critical to our health and many areas of well being as well as improving how products function over time.   Look forward to continuing this discussion.

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Remy Dou

    Remy Dou

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 13, 2021 | 12:47 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing this video about your interesting work! I'm curious about the type of data that you may have collected from participants and how you went about doing so. If this wasn't an aspect of this particular project, what kind of data do you think would be feasible and worthwhile to collect?

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 13, 2021 | 08:29 a.m.

    This is a key question, thank you for asking.  Data and analysis are areas that cause many people concerns, yet understanding how critical having data to structure the narrative and visual is was why I became involved with NASA/AREN as an anchoring project to the use of sensors with a recognized global claim to successful use of data with their missions. Their process of decision making and communication to the public reaches us and involves us in their work. 

     

    The kind of data that I started with was aligned with my interests in documentation first with photography but as digital images continue to be less aligned with the light and color we actually experience, I sought sensors to document that element and am researching how the light/temp relationship regulates systems. Obtaining interesting data like under frozen ponds and in wind gusts builds a challenge on how to express the systemic effect of slight changes with solely numbers. 

    Gaining perspectives of patterns in our own living sites is engaging to others IF expressed through their interests and with through their senses.  Light and temperature are our first engaging senses and how they apply to the concept of albedo is easily discussed to people who ask about the purpose of flying the Aeropod and extending sensors from that tool to other locations and applications.  Soil moisture is the current challenge.

      Continue to push me to think further about data from the sensors.  Do you work with sensors?  How do you engage others with your research?  

     

     

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
  • Icon for: Remy Dou

    Remy Dou

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 14, 2021 | 12:30 p.m.

    Thank you for your response, Betsy. I was curious about collecting data about and from the students involved. It sounds like some earned certificates or took online courses. I'm sure their involvement in the project had an impact on their life in relation to their intended careers. I was just curious about whether any data from student participants were collected.

     
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    Sabrina De Los Santos
    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 14, 2021 | 04:04 p.m.

    Yes, some have earned certificates prior to the COVID through USGreen Building Council’s Green Educator Certificate which aided the sensor users to structure existing architectural recognition to measured design areas as “LEED” levels or achievement.   Some were immediately able to join conferences and Moocs that “flipped” to support topics of particular college age interests. Others were planned industry conferences that became free or financially more accessible as virtual over site based.

    The shutdown of schools and online (virtual focus) was another option to point to USGBC’s existing program and apply what is usually an award on a finished building design or upgrade to aid meaning for measurements by sensors to consider new civil engineering “codes” or laws regarding the changing expectations of structures.  The concept of “resilience” and insistence by youth to be sustainable was a focus of the broader project and applies to the sensors also used to extend the NASA/AREN integration into education.  

    Great to have you mention the student impact on intended careers. The student participants are collecting their data and are required to show how they document their expressed level of achievement.  We strongly connect documentation with value and ability to communication their project. Defining STEM Literacy as the union of the languages of text, visual…and data is the core of our projects. 

     Learners are truly inventive and interesting in how they bounce into considering data when it comes to their projects....and are told from the get/go that it is part of their evaluation. Sensors only do what they are set to accomplish. 

     Its a complete learning event to read a logger that was set properly but forgotten to be set in place...or left in a box.  All a positive lesson before the next stage in a field setting.  Most of the fearsome term "analysis" is overcome by these small steps taken together in a project.

    At first all the loggers are set the same in different locations so we always have some discussion, contrasts....and yes...botches that we all learn from and aids individuals to be part of a "Community of practice". ...not graded in competition  with each other.  As you set up a request for students to submit data ensure that you honor that it IS their data and show them how to set up their collection files with that meta data.  

  • Icon for: Bob Riddle

    Bob Riddle

    Co-Presenter
    Column Editor
    May 15, 2021 | 08:15 a.m.


    Hello,
    I'd like to add that the data loggers Betsy sent last fall where monitored by the 2 kiddos next door, 4th and 5th grades. The loggers were put in their house, one in a south facing window and the other a north facing window. I just told them that a Scientist friend of mine was doing a study about light and left it at that. I also gave them the bag of candy Betsy had included!
    Every once in a while when I would see them getting off the school bus or if they came over when I had a telescope in the driveway we would talk about the data loggers. I never tell them anything other than the loggers collected light data and as we talked I tried to have them lead the discussion as they formed their own ideas.
    One take away is that they know a little more about Scientific methods, processes, and maybe even how Scientists do their 'thing', through their involvement in the project.


    ===(Below is cross-post as I put these comments in a different but related discussion stream. Sorry!)


    Betsy asked me to post some comments about the work we have shared over the last few years.
    What I am describing is how we combined motion and sound data, visuals, and music into performances under a Planetarium Dome.
    I met Betsy, don't remember how, but it was by way of a high-altitude balloon project I was involved with. Betsy sent us data loggers we attached to the payload package. They collected motion data throughout the ascent and descent. We also had cameras as part of the payload for recording pictures and video. While from Betsy's perspective collecting motion, light, and sound data was a high priority our data priority were the visuals. We had two successful flights: one landed 10 miles away, the 2nd one went from the western Kansas City, MO suburbs to almost the Illinois River on the other side of Missouri. I worked with a group of musicians and students from several high schools. Work on the payload and other components was done at a local hobby shop.
    What was done with the data collected was made into a full-dome video, Ascent, that was accompanied by a live performance of music written specifically for the video. This led to our being invited to launch a balloon from Kauffman Stadium during an event hosted by a local TV station called "School Day at the K." We launched the balloon equipped with a TV camera for live broadcasts from the balloon. These were displayed periodically on the large screens. One of my columns that year was about the balloon project.


    Here is a link to that column:http://currentsky.com/Scope-on-the-skies/2012/nov12-ascent.pdf
    This was a collaboration between me, as the Astronomer/graphics editor and a group of musicians. Collectively we called ourselves Dark Matter. The Ascent production was our second collaboration - the first was called Orbit and were several full-dome videos about our solar system accompanied with original music.
    Some of the music were space sounds, radio and other instrument sounds, as well as some electronic wizardry during the performance.
    Betsy and I co-authored a column about the use of data collectors: Give them the Tools
    Here is a link to the Dark Matter videos stored in my cloud:Dark Matter Videos


  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 15, 2021 | 10:48 a.m.

    Thanks, Bob for joining in and sharing the ventures that connect with this year’s video and our goal of extending the outreach to local sites.  The activity of setting up loggers that he describes is our entry and key comparison collection period.  Last year we were able to have them positioned in all four seasonal light periods (equinox/solstice) in buildings and are off and running for this year to continue projects.

    Bob was also part of our cross country eclipse project in August 2017 and Holly developed a combination sensor that we are learning to “read” with the Aeropod’s new data logger holding extensions.  The turbulence at the low levels is what the students are checking on in their school site segment of the video, prior to the COVID closing and the teacher with the check list is preparing for the next step, ideally flying the Aeropod as spring is finally in NH. We count on hearing more at all the flyers of kites consider their next projects.

    The pond in the beginning has finally lost its ice covering and our logger that spent a long 2nd winter will be back soon to share data.

    The project in Key West launched by Tony Casserley (Captains Corner),  extended from his scuba diving with the loggers as NOAA’s Key West location recorded indoors.  Tony developed a physical activity of riding up the closed highway carrying sensors and his camera.  With the opening of Key West he’s moved his energy to wind/weather and location reporting from the reef and on building sites on the wind conditions this year. Tony sent a photo yesterday with his data of the lights that are designed to avoid confusing the turtles as they leave their nests and head to sea.  We are off and running early this year on our summer start to extend projects.  An observer in North Carolina report of the nesting turtles reaching a near beach.   We expect to extend the soil moisture measurements into the sands as a shared extension from our garden soil and flooding conditions projects.  Great way to enjoy the seasons…and fellowship of a community of practice.  Thanks to everyone involved.

  • Icon for: Peter Haydock

    Peter Haydock

    Co-Presenter
    COO
    May 16, 2021 | 03:01 p.m.

    When we were approached us to be a part of this project, we were already deeply engaged with creating experiences for students that started with building their own sensors and then collecting the data. The work presented here is the natural extension in learning by using the instruments to create data sets from the field for analysis.  This work facilitates the localization and personalization of knowledge and understanding. It creates an experience for the concepts that come from a book in more generalized explanations.

    It is one thing to talk about the data expected but to see wind, heat transfer, and movement of air and heat in a space, but to see it illustrated in your own home or your own backyard personalizes it for a student. It drives curiosity about the spaces we are in all the time.

    All of us are passionate about STEM - but conveying that can get bogged down in learning and not doing. We have tried with this project and with all of our other work to create more doing that creates learning through the experiences that motivated us the most as STEM professionals and STEM educators that STEM is an action.

    We remembered our field experiences, the challenge of "crunching the data" and either confirming something that is understood - or revealing something new about our location or subjects and wanted to share that sense of awe as something was revealed in what we measured. Thank you for watching our work with these amazing students.

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 17, 2021 | 10:11 a.m.

    Hi, Peter,

     Thank you for adding your research into the discussion.  You describe the critical objective to bring data collection and application “home” without the painful concerns of meeting subject/domain goals and/or bridging privacy.

    Sensors wear an undeserved reputation from the inexperience of general public use with their output and engagement with applications. Also, students have assignments that repeat past processes and activities, ensuring that they “align” with courses, however have difficulty introducing their advancing use.

     Having this Covid shutdown opened areas to explore and augment learning support to STEM through improving online support as well as focused content. The cohorts that formed as family, neighbors and friends built a lens that is difficult to view.  The club and course focus to aid the sites to enjoy the full flights have changing memberships however very essential to ensure this year’s project groups aid us in the field.

     Connecting with the wind power inserts an observation that is always available yet transparent and continually changeable. Flying under kite power is traditional yet another power tool with a future. 

    Thanks for joining in the challenge to advance the experiences to all.

  • Small default profile

    Soha Munir

    Undergraduate Student
    May 16, 2021 | 08:16 p.m.

    Great work by the researchers and interns!

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 16, 2021 | 09:24 p.m.

    Soha, 

     Thanks for being a part of the team effort to build this year's video.  Documenting with photographs  from the field is essential and this year particularly challenging.  Also ideas and   help to figure out how to build a campus map with soil moisture measurements to monitor unobservable ground water takes remote sensing to the next level.   Look forward to fall extensions.

  • Small default profile

    Hun Ellen

    K-12 Student
    May 17, 2021 | 11:18 a.m.

    Very detailed explanations from the team! I enjoyed learning from the video; however, it would be nice to hear the students' voiceovers rather than the robots' voiceovers.

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 17, 2021 | 11:43 a.m.

    Thank you for that suggestion!  One issue we had with the Covid was recordinfocug sound in the field. 

    A huge regret is balancing actual student voice with visual requirements on the video length.  The timing of the discussion period also overlaps final spring term papers, exams and grading.  Always an issue with active professors as well as students.  Marilyn Moriarty, author of our initial NSF funded publication, Writing Science through Critical Thinking is always engaged during this time of year and the focus of IHE IT is on campus use, especially during COVID.

    We hope to see the students join us before the end tomorrow. 

  • Icon for: Holly Ralph

    Holly Ralph

    May 17, 2021 | 03:03 p.m.

    In the past, I have had students do stream studies and post their data which they compared to other students' data from around the world.  The comparisons brought up lots of questions and they were very involved as they researched their answers. 

    I also take trackers with me as I travel.  Going to James Bay in February where the temperature was -40 was an interesting one.  Even more interesting to me was the light.   Somehow I expected there to be a lot less light as I was thinking it was farther north than it was. It is only 51.2731° N.  I'm used to being in much warmer Iceland with a lot less light!  64.1466° N

    I also like to put thermal trackers on my motorcycle for cross-continent trips.  Colorado is a great place to show the temperature differences as they relate to height above sea level.   I usually wear an emergency tracker as well just in case.   Once on a trip from Germany to Croatia I got an email from a friend after a day's riding in Austria telling me my tracker was broken.   Not at all!  This one would have been fun for students to try to figure out.  The reason was that I was riding through Austria not on it.   There were miles and miles of long tunnels, sometimes with only at 500 metres between the end of one and the start of the next--not long enough to find a satellite and connect. 

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2021 | 12:32 p.m.

    Hi, Holly

    Yes for visualization as many have been connected over time through various programs that use experiences to build the skills to consider visualization through existing systems.  Holly and I were involved with the same program and those involved have grown up to be engineers and architects.   Our 4th and 5th'ers in our 4-H group working with their brothers and sisters were part of that same stream study and learning GIS, placing their experience into numbers and seeing a visual form...a map.   Mapping has transformed the outreach of

    measurement with he use of icons and use of  colors to represent functions.  Their integration beyond  illustration is  faster then traditional learning can keep up...but not lost on the public as they represent their visual interests as a pathway to consider spatial questions.

      

     

  • Small default profile

    Chanmolis Mout

    Undergraduate Student
    May 17, 2021 | 06:43 p.m.

    Thank you everyone for your comments!

    My name is Molis. I have been working with Betsy since the summer of 2020. Betsy has given me the freedom to conduct my own research in my areas of interest which are water quality and soil moisture. Through the provision of multiple data loggers and soil moisture equipment, I started recording data to see how soil moisture, light intensity, and soil temperature affect the quality of farm soil. Over the summer, I also attended a lot of webinars and online sessions offered by the Department of Energy and learned about ways companies and organizations are efficiently using energy. I also earned the US Green Building Certificate.

    Over the period of January Term, I interned for SABEN Group and received the same freedom to conduct my research. Despite the challenges posed by COVID-19, I got an opportunity to continue my research from the summer. Through effective communications, I was able to send the collected data from Hollins to my internship supervisor.

    A lot of students are not getting the full experience of education in this time period because they lack the interactions with their peers and teachers. However, because we are having more time in our hands, I think it is a great opportunity for them to explore their passions such as conducting research or experiments. The lack of equipment is one big hurdle to get over, however, there are a lot of experiments out there that require very simple equipment or none at all. It is up to us to show the new generation the way to experience their potential in the world they live in!

  • Small default profile

    Geoff Bland

    Researcher
    May 18, 2021 | 07:55 a.m.

    Great to hear Molis!

    Your comment about access to equipment is key - very often simple tools can help us learn quite a bit about our environment. One favorite is "Streamer Sticks" or ribbons (surveyors tape works well) tied to sticks or tree branches to highlight the spatial variability in wind direction and speed... helpful information for location influences on comfort and air quality, for example.  

    Please keep up the great work....

     

  • Small default profile

    Geoff Bland

    Researcher
    May 18, 2021 | 07:55 a.m.

    Great to hear Molis!

    Your comment about access to equipment is key - very often simple tools can help us learn quite a bit about our environment. One favorite is "Streamer Sticks" or ribbons (surveyors tape works well) tied to sticks or tree branches to highlight the spatial variability in wind direction and speed... helpful information for location influences on comfort and air quality, for example.  

    Please keep up the great work....

     

  • Icon for: Holly Ralph

    Holly Ralph

    May 17, 2021 | 06:49 p.m.

    I think freedom is the key word in your post, Molis.  It is wonderful that you experienced that as you did your research.  Agreed, that there is so much that can be done with simple or no equipment.  We may all be surprised by what has been accomplished this past year despite the constraints of the pandemic.

  • Icon for: James Callahan

    James Callahan

    Informal Educator
    May 18, 2021 | 06:20 a.m.

    Oh, we will definitely want  to follow and stay in touch with you. Great program!

    At the Mobile Climate Science Labs, we too do quite a lot that involves remote sensing. Creating a bridge between current science research and the understanding and keen interest of the public.  You'll see, for instance, how much remote sensing is a video subject on our Youtube channel: Climate Science Demonstrations .   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqFObPDn5SR4VR...

    We have found that both students and families are fascinated with what can be learned via remote sensing, especially when it is connected with their own experiences.  

    Among the satellites we feature and study: GOES, TERRA, Landsat, and the Sentinel series.

    Question: How do you all approach this?  I would even say it is a bit of a controversy in the federal agencies.

    A very influential school of thought is that students and the general public are not capable of understanding imaging that relates to invisible light -- in particular the different bands of infrared light. Only undergraduate science majors and above can comprehend this science. Based on that assumption, imaging that is shared with the public is almost always limited to those in visible light.

    So much of current research and monitoring is actually in the electromagnetic spectrum outside of the invisible light range. This stance does have the effect of keeping people out of getting their own experience in STEM that goes beyond that portion of light that the unaided human eye can see.

    Wondering what you all think about this?  Is it best to stay restricted to visible light?  Should students and the public be given opportunities to experience remote sensing of the invisible world that is all around us?  

    Thank you for your very important work, and wonderful video!

  • Small default profile

    Geoff Bland

    Researcher
    May 18, 2021 | 08:11 a.m.

    Great question James....

    Availability of affordable near-infrared and thermal infrared imagers enables exploration of the spectrum beyond the visible. It seems this offers a valuable insight to the world beyond what we as humans can observe without additional tools... no need to restrict to the visible spectrum in my opinion. Building familiarity with information derived from unfamiliar sources is important.

     

  • Icon for: Marilyn Moriarty

    Marilyn Moriarty

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 18, 2021 | 09:12 a.m.

    I think it's important for experiences to move beyond visible light. Students and the public would already have been exposed to this sensing technology through action adventure films. Even if the technology might be fanciful in some respects, it nevertheless opens the door to thinking about different possibilities. And beekeepers would be familiar with their bees'  behavioral responses to non-visible light though they, beekeepers,  might not be able to discuss the theory.

  • Small default profile

    Steve Jarman

    May 18, 2021 | 10:31 a.m.

    First, I would like to respond to James's question about allowing students and the public to have opportunities to experience remote sensing of the invisible world around us.

     

    Absolutely.  Don't hold information back from them, especially the students.  They tend to ask questions that adults don't even consider.

     

    Marilyn has an excellent point.  They've already been exposed to sensing technology.  Why use this technology for alien movies?  Allow students to use it for educational purposes. 

     

    I've carried data loggers on trips to the Caribbean many times.  I still regret losing that one down at Bonaire several years ago.  I've also carried them around with me here in Tornado Alley.  Fortunately, I've never lost one to a tornado.

     

    Enough about me.  Keep the students involved.  Allow them to have ownership.  To borrow an expression from Beck, that's "Where it's at!"

     

     

  • Icon for: Holly Ralph

    Holly Ralph

    May 18, 2021 | 12:02 p.m.

    Students have amazing invisible abilities we can't even guess at.  Never limit them because you think it is above them.   When GIS was a new concept and just starting up at our local university I brought grades 4 & 5 students to the university to see what was happening.  Despite all those "Oh they are too young to understand" reservations at the university, my students were able to follow the process.  Molis mentioned freedom to do her research.  Give your students the freedom to do theirs without artificial boundaries.

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2021 | 02:30 p.m.

    Molis,

     Glad you are finishing your exams and have joined the discussion.  Your mention of   Department of Energy’s Better Buildings’ Conference  shows how fast sensors are being integrated into decision making during this COVID year.  Last year’s week of comparative sites tracking energy has changed in a year of air quality (HVAC) systems to the sharing of  how industry is integrating sensors and their visualization of data to improve all aspects of product development and production.

      The early USGBC awards and displays of those “racetracks” of aspects of data are out to public use to design homes and investigate materials.  You are still one step ahead of them as you explore water moving through its states with sensors.  Also in recognizing how the tools do not replace the human experience with the subject being measured.   Today’s panel in that conference expressed the wish that science could explore the “social side” of science to improve public understanding of the benefits of sensor integration.  Your college cohorts first attracted my attention by their immediate drive towards sustainability ..even before the COVID changed our approach to thinking about the activities. 

    The application in farming has also been an important step. Our “flyfields” for the kite powered Aeropod were first on historical Shaker lands. I have since worked with our mutual friend Lanetta Ware as she raises and harvest hay and realize that the Shakers placed the fields to use the wind to dry various products.  The positioning of the open space creates pockets of climate that the work that you helped with this year to consider through seasonal data will be a continued interest and our need for interest in “remote sensing” by all. 

    Thank you for finding time to venture with us. Your patience and inputs have been not only timely but critical to fill gaps in everyone's  thinking and applications to technology's opportunities. 

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2021 | 04:30 p.m.

    James,

     Thanks for viewing our video. The project is a descendant of CLEAN as we joined in many calls over the years and involved the approach of engagement….but from the roots up.  The issue of reaching teachers gaps also was due Harvard’s MOSART testing which demonstrated that average citizens were missing out on topics involving optics and materials…heat transfer and materials redirection of light…also dual variables in graphs. These areas were worse in our science teachers that joined our first federal funding.

    Why would that be?  We are rurally located without some of the recent hands out and interactive exhibits not to mention that many of our science teachers are older and items have leaped into their horizon but not to their accepted, day to day lessons.  Your work to place these items are critical as the kids bring these topics forward and as they have been out of school these resources are MORE available to them.

    Today, for example the issue of access to this video became “problematic” due to how our areas internet is routed. The kind people at the “contact” tracked that issue.  This also has been another visual issue in that some living in rural locations that viewed or commented here were not shown on the Google map.  What impact might that have on what we learn and how it is available to us? 

    The balance of that issue in the past has been the access to experiential learning and natural resources at our constant “doorstep” however fair knowledge of STEM is an issue.  Molis helped me think of the issues in Global context as Covid kept her in the US.  

     As we improve our  resilience the issue of public capacity to understand either through experience or interacting with models..and most likely all of those options for certain topics…will continue to be wrestled to the ground. Data into visual form with narrative in a relevant form is the way we approach STEM Literacy..and using a community of Practice has helped all of us to learn from where we are.

    Thanks again for asking great questions. Will continue to ponder them…and build more activities and media to join people into discussions...both work with the right process and timing.  

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2021 | 07:13 p.m.

    As we conclude we continue to have issues of posting and reviewing the video.  Please contact me directly either via the email used during the conference (bastefany@gmail.com) or any one of the co-presenters OR ask the STEM for All conference folk!  
    Thanks to everyone who joined the discussion and NASA/AREN who has supported outreach of sensor education through this session.

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Lead Presenter
    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2021 | 07:58 p.m.

    Thanks to all of you for contributing to our learning.  Please connect through me-bastefany@gmail.com

     

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