1192 Views
  1. Sherry Southerland
  2. https://lcdpd.education.fsu.edu/
  3. Anne & John Daves Professor of Science Education
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Florida State University
  1. Ruveyde Asli Kaya
  2. Graduate Researcher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Florida State University
  1. Sierra Morandi
  2. Graduate Researcher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Florida State University
  1. Jennifer Schellinger
  2. Postdoctoral Researcher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Florida State University

Learning through Collaborative Design - Professional Development

NSF Awards: 1720587

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 6-8, Grades 9-12, Adult learners

National reform efforts in science education suggest that science learning should be propelled by the need to “figure things out”, engaging students to make sense of and explain a natural phenomenon. Student talk is essential to this work. Learning through Collaborative Design Professional Development (LCD PD) is a National Science Foundation-funded PD and research project focused on supporting teacher practice that enhances student thinking and learning through talk. LCD PD is guided by nationally recognized science education researchers and PD experts with a goal of providing teachers with the skills to engage students in sensemaking in biology through talk and to provide the field with valuable insight into effective designs for science teacher PD. A key focus of LCD PD is to (1) engage teachers as students in science activities and then unpack the pedagogy that underpins these learning experiences so they can better consider how the student experience can be leveraged to support talk in science classrooms and (2) to help teachers design, analyze, and refine their practice in collaboration with their peers. In this video showcase, we present the structure of the LCD PD model that we have refined and developed to date, the design of the field study to occur in the summer of 2021 and across the 2021/2022 academic year, as well as an overview of some of our early research findings.

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (20 posts)
  • Icon for: Jennifer Schellinger

    Jennifer Schellinger

    Co-Presenter
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    May 10, 2021 | 04:06 p.m.

    Welcome and thank you for taking the time to watch our video! We would be interested in hearing your ideas and feedback on the following questions:

    • How have events of the past year shaped your ideas about the role of talk in science?
    • What do you see as the role of collaboration in PD?
    • If you are a teacher, what was an effective PD that you have attended, and what was the role of collaboration in that PD?
    • What experiences have you had with productive science talk? What are the affordances of such talk in science instruction? What struggles might arise when supporting such talk?   
    • What caught your attention most about the Learning through Collaborative Design Professional Development project?
  • Icon for: Kirby Whittington

    Kirby Whittington

    Postdoctoral Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 02:11 p.m.

    It was so nice to hear more about the project. There is so much that goes into just setting up productive science talk. You all mentioned the aspect of rigorous tasks as a foundation for productive talk. I am curious to know more about how the teachers think about this connection between the task and talk. I would also like to know more about how participation in science activities helps teachers learn how to foster this productive science talk. 

    Thank you all so much for sharing this project!

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 02:34 p.m.

    Hi Dr. Whittington! Thank you so much for watching! I can partly attend to your question about the participation in the science activities in helping teachers to foster productive science talk. By engaging in these activities throughout the PD they are positioned to be in a student role, working collaboratively and getting to interact with the facilitators who model facilitation of productive talk. From my experience with our teachers, being able to participate in these robust tasks and actively engage in sensemaking they learn certain moves or questions that they want to incorporate in their classroom to foster productive talk! 

  • Icon for: TJ McKenna

    TJ McKenna

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2021 | 02:19 p.m.

    Great video and wonderful to hear more about this project! The past year has definitely reinforced what we know about how important it is to include student voice in all parts learning. Thank you for creating and sharing this video!

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 02:35 p.m.

    Hi TJ! Thank you so much for watching our video, we are so glad you enjoyed it! 

  • Icon for: Thomas Smith

    Thomas Smith

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 11, 2021 | 07:35 p.m.

    This is a great project and a great video! How much are the researchers involved in the PD, particularly in the design, analyze, and refine phase? Some work we have done in teacher learning communities in mathematics suggest the need for there to be a more expert "other" in the group for teachers to make significant progress on improving their teaching. I like your study design. What are some of the measures you plan to use to assess whether the PD working the way you hope it will? What might be some challenges in taking this model to scale?

    Thanks, Tom

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 11, 2021 | 08:06 p.m.

    Hi Tom! 

    Our in-cycle school research team is quite involved with the phases especially our graduate students who collaborate with some of our teachers during the design, analyze and refine phase. I know one of my colleagues has worked continuously with one of our first groups of teachers to continually refine and further develop lessons that came from the PD. That's a very interesting implication from your research and definitely something I think our team could learn from. We currently do pre and post-summer surveys, interviews, and a noticing video task that helps us understand how teachers are engaging with the PD as well as how we can better enact the PD. I know that we have adjusted the tasks and what teachers will engage in based on our previous summer experiences. There are definitely some challenges we've faced especially with COVID and how it's affected the ability to recruit participants. We have a really wonderful group of faculty and graduate students that have mitigated a lot of the challenges with their quick thinking and problem-solving. I know I've learned so much from them on how to be flexible and adapt! 

    Thank you for such great questions and I'm glad you liked the video! 

  • Icon for: Mike Vargas

    Mike Vargas

    Facilitator
    Physics Teacher
    May 12, 2021 | 07:28 a.m.

    Hello - I really enjoyed watching your video. There is a lot of good stuff here in this work. I am curious to see what you final results will be. A lot of the things your are working on sounds like modeling instruction and I was wondering if you guys use any of these techniques in your PD? I was also wondering what are the science disciplines your program is currently working with? Grades? Etc.?  Are there any indicators that this type of instruction works better for one kind of discipline over another. For example is there more success in physics over bio etc? Thanks again for your insights. Great video ! 

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 12, 2021 | 08:22 a.m.

    Hi Mike! It is so good to hear that you enjoyed the video! 

    A lot of the instruction in the PD is exactly what our teachers are engaging in in their own classrooms, from the robust tasks to the questioning and moves to facilitate talk. I too am excited to see what our PD this summer will bring and the new information it will provide us! We work with mainly high school biology teachers, however this summer we are also working with high school environmental science teachers and have previously worked with middle school biology teachers and chemistry teachers. We don't have any indicators of this type of instruction working for one discipline over another, hopefully, it benefits them all but such an interesting point! 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Mike Vargas
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    Gülcin Müminoglu

    K-12 Teacher
    May 12, 2021 | 01:12 p.m.

    Hello. I enjoyed watching the video. I wonder what the outcome of the study will be. I am a Math teacher at a high-school. Although the project is specific to science education, I think it may be applicable to math as well. Is there a section about distance education in your study ? During the pandemic,  we all have struggles to engaging students to make sense of. But of course , beyond the distance education, engaging students to discuss about mathemathical concepts is the basic part of the teaching. As a teacher, I would be happy to see any work that would help me improve in this area..

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 13, 2021 | 08:35 p.m.

    Hi Gülcin! I am so glad you enjoyed watching the video! I think that there are many things applicable to different disciplines of science as well as math from this collaborative PD effort. As far as distance learning we do not have it as part of our summer PD, but this year with COVID many of the in-school cycle teachers we followed had remote learners which brought about challenges we've since overcome. Distance learning actually provides to spur an additional project for us in creating a space where science teachers across the whole southeast U.S. could discuss lessons and support one another! I think it would be great to have something larger and for more than just biology or chemistry but inclusive of mathematics as well! 

  • Icon for: Jennifer Schellinger

    Jennifer Schellinger

    Co-Presenter
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 06:29 p.m.

    Hi Gülcin! Thank you for your questions and interest in our project. 

    While we are still collecting data as part of our larger project. One thing we have found is that you really have to start with a robust and rigorous lesson, one that is field-tested and stands up in the classroom. This is not necessarily a new idea, however, when revising lessons with productive discourse in mind, it is better to start with a strong frame.

     

    Another finding relates to the power that different actors have across a lesson (e.g., launch, main activity, and wrap-up). We’ve found that it is not enough for the teacher and the curriculum to frame lessons in the way of doing science (and likely the ways of doing math) or to provide students with opportunities to engage in small group discourse but, instead, that the wrap-up, often a portion of the lesson that is short, holds a lot of impact. In the wrap-up, a teacher can be the central actor providing students with the correct canonical answer to the task or the students can be the central actors and the teacher can play a supporting role in orchestrating their ideas towards a shared understanding of a canonically correct answer. When the wrap-up is handled in the first way, students come to view such activities as ones in which they will do “some work” with their peers but that, ultimately, they will be provided with the correct answer, potentially reducing the value they hold in their work. A wrap-up approached in the latter way has the potential to position students to see the power of their work in constructing knowledge, especially when this strategy is used over the course of the year. I imagine that this is also an important consideration in terms of supporting students’ mathematical thinking such that attending to students’ ideas in the conclusion of a lesson can shape how they see their work and engage in developing understandings in subsequent work.

     

    A tool that we use and that you might find useful is the Goals for Productive Discussion and Nine Talk moves presented by The Inquiry Project.  

  • Icon for: Rebecca Vieyra

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Facilitator
    Doctoral Student
    May 12, 2021 | 02:15 p.m.

    Hi, all! I am curious to know more about the principles upon which the PD was built, particularly as it relates to "strategies that support productive science talk." 

    I'm also curious to know how this PD is differentiated from something like Modeling Instruction (https://www.modelinginstruction.org/), which makes very heavy use of student-led discourse.

    One of the things that I think is particularly notable is that the Modeling approach experiences suggests that teachers often need 2-3 weeks of full-day practice in order to actually see a shift in their instructional approach. Do your findings support/refute this? 

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 13, 2021 | 10:32 a.m.

    I think that our PD is different from the modeling instruction (coming from knowing very little about the modeling instruction and I have really enjoyed the link you provided)!  I say this because one of our main goals of this project is to look at the role of collaboration and how it benefits teachers in fostering productive science talk in their classrooms. Teachers are engaging in materials during the PD that helps them use specific tools and practices but are positioned as a student during PD. And while I cannot refute or support the 2-3 weeks of full-day practice for teacher shift, our teachers who participate in our in-school cycles of design, teach, analyze work through learning to support science talk in their classrooms throughout an entire year. Several of our in-school years from previous years still continue to work with us. I know as we go into our summer PD for this year we are excited to learn more from our teachers and how we can support them in supporting productive science talk in their classrooms. Thank you so much for the questions! 

     
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    Thomas Smith
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    Ozlem Deniz

    K-12 Teacher
    May 14, 2021 | 04:29 a.m.

    Hello from another math teacher!

    The video is intriguing. I am so curious about your research but the tasks at most. I wonder how the tasks were designed? Was it all done by the researchers or the participating teachers  did some part as well?

    Being a practitioner I would have liked the opportunity to get involved in such a collaborative professional development process. It seems really convincing to get the opportunity of wearing student hat and getting student’s perspective through productive/creative talking. I belive your finding will be applicaple to different disciplines so I can’t wait to hear your findings.

  • Icon for: Ruveyde Asli Kaya

    Ruveyde Asli Kaya

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 14, 2021 | 09:32 a.m.

    Hi Ozlem! Thanks so much for your question and interest! 

    One of the main goals of the LCD PD project is to engage teachers design of tasks and lesson plans and support their ambitious teaching practices. Through summer LCD PD, teachers have presented some tasks and lesson plans and work on some aspects of them like guidance questions, the flow of the lesson, and uncertainly in the tasks. We can say it is more like a collaborative work through PD that continues in-school cycles as well. During the in-school work, teachers co-think with other teachers and some of our research team to design the lessons further, with revisions after they teach the lesson as well. I think it would be great to include different disciplines! 

  • May 17, 2021 | 10:52 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your work. There are a lot of parallels between your work and the work we are doing in the Responsive Math Teaching project, particularly with respect to 1) engaging teachers as learners and 2) engaging teachers in collaborative lesson design. We have found both of these things to be very powerful for instructional change and for the development of instructional leadership. Have you done any research into what teachers learn from engaging as learners?

  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 18, 2021 | 11:41 a.m.

    Hi Caroline! That is so exciting to hear about Math ed, your video was great and I see the exact same parallels you noted! As far as teachers engaging as learners and what they learn, members of our research team are working on looking at how teachers engaged with this position and what experiences they had. I'd like to think that this could evolve into learning something new about this positioning, and hope that we'll be able to have more to share soon! 

  • May 18, 2021 | 01:31 p.m.

    Great--we are digging into that data as well. We'll have to compare notes!

  • May 18, 2021 | 06:58 p.m.

    What a fascinating video! I would love to learn more about the specific teaching moves that emerged from the PD and worked to facilitate student talk, and the moves that pushes students to engage in accumulating ideas rather than sense-making. Do you have any papers you can share?

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Multiplex Discussion
  • Icon for: Sierra Morandi

    Sierra Morandi

    Co-Presenter
    Graduate Researcher
    May 25, 2021 | 12:06 p.m.

    Hi Libby! I am so sorry that I did not see this during the showcase! We are currently working through a lot of our data and will hopefully have some work to share with you soon, specifically on the teaching moves that emerged to facilitate student talk!  

     
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