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Icon for: David Hanauer

DAVID HANAUER

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Rapid Response Grant - Ramifications of Emergency Transition to Remote Learni...

NSF Awards: 2027665

2021 (see original presentation & discussion)

Undergraduate

The disruptions of the sudden transition to remote teaching as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic during the Spring 2020 semester have raised questions concerning the viability of a remote version of the Course-Based Research Experience (CRE) educational model. The current study leveraged the opportunities afforded by a large-scale CRE program - The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) - to answer 4 questions: Can a CRE be conducted remotely? Are the outcomes of a remote CRE equitable to CREs conducted in person-to-person formats? Using a quasi-experimental, matched group comparison design, students studying in the Spring 2020 semester (n=1891) were compared to a database of students who had studied in this program in previous years (n=12,777). Results revealed that the computationally intensive Bioinformatics component functioned equitably as a remote CRE while the hands-on Discovery component was negatively affected.  We conclude that a remote CRE is viable when the science is digitally based, when the scientific outcomes produced by the students are of value and when the scientific community has presence for the student-researcher.

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Discussion from the 2021 STEM For All Video Showcase (19 posts)
  • Icon for: Mesut Duran

    Mesut Duran

    Facilitator
    Professor of Technology
    May 11, 2021 | 06:27 a.m.

    --Thank you for this timely research, and for sharing the study results. I wonder if you could provide some more info about student demographics. And, if studied, were there any significant impact on varying student groups like gender and ethnicity.  Thanks, Mesut

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 11, 2021 | 09:34 a.m.

    Hello Mesut,

    Thanks for your comment. So in relation to student demographics, this study was drawn from the overall population of the SEA-PHAGES program. This is a very large community alliance with over 120 schools and several thousand students. We encompass all school types (cc, R1, 4-year schools...etc) and a wide range of student demographics. For full information on this please check out this paper: 

    https://www.pnas.org/content/114/51/13531

    For the analysis I randomly extracted and propensity score matched different student demographics (ethnicity and gender) in the COVID-19 Remote and prior year face to face instruction. I did not have time in the 3 minutes allotted to address the comparison. But basically, the outcomes are that for the bioinformatics section there are not differences in the research experiences outcomes for any of the matched subgroups. This suggests a good outcome for online bioinformatics (digitally based science) for all subgroups. There is one caveat though.  I did also check sub-group participation rates and there is a drop in the number of URM male students who participated. So the conclusion is that if you can get them into the online, digital science CRE, you will have equitable outcomes (probably) but there is a drop off in some groups participation at least during the COVID-19 period.

    Thank you for your question

     

  • Icon for: Mesut Duran

    Mesut Duran

    Facilitator
    Professor of Technology
    May 11, 2021 | 09:43 a.m.

    Appreciate the response, David, this is very helpful.  For sure, I'll check out the paper you shared.  Thanks, Mesut

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 11, 2021 | 11:14 a.m.

    Thanks Mesut,

    if you have questions, please reach out and I will do my best to answer.

    David

  • Icon for: Mesut Duran

    Mesut Duran

    Facilitator
    Professor of Technology
    May 13, 2021 | 07:11 a.m.

    Will do.  Thanks, Mesut

  • Icon for: Jack Broering

    Jack Broering

    Program Coordinator
    May 11, 2021 | 08:11 a.m.

    Your conclusion that the digital experience is equivalent to the face to face experience if you have a digital equivalent.  Would appreciate your thoughts on how the University of Pittsburgh is doing in developing courses that can rely on digital delivery as you describe in your video.

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 11, 2021 | 09:34 a.m.

    Dear Jack,

    Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, I am only involved at the University of Pittsburgh in the SEA-PHAGES program and I am not the best person to ask about other digital CRE initiatives. However, I did want to point out that meanwhile we have two semesters of data which look at digital science (bioinformatics) and wetlab (phage discovery) and the results are consistent with what I reported in the presentation. In fact we have new data which looked at hybrid models (partial participation in the physical space of the lab) and it shows a very similar results which is that for the digital science sections in or out of the lab we have equitable results of a full research experience; for wetlab only fully in the lab actually produces a full research experience.

    I am sorry I couldn't answer your question directly.

     

     

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Facilitator
    Professor of Physics and Astronomy
    May 11, 2021 | 11:00 a.m.

    Thank you for your video. Your findings are admirable simple yet impactful. How did you try to replicate the wet lab experience on-line?

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 11, 2021 | 11:12 a.m.

    Hello Alexander,

    Thanks for the kind words and the comment. This is a large program with a wide range of faculty at over 120 institutions. I did do an analysis of the what the instructors said about how they did the online- wet-lab component. The following strategies were the most prevalent: some faculty performed the wet-lab tasks with students watching; some worked with small teams in which one student did work for the other students (in a form of rotation); some offered simulated presentations. There were some other variations on this. I did do an analysis from the second COVID-19 semester in which I considered hybrid models directly (none, partial and full physical wet-lab participation). Only the full physical presence model produced a full research experience in the wet-lab.

    Thanks for your question

    David

     

  • Icon for: Thomas Veague

    Thomas Veague

    Community Engagement Manager
    May 12, 2021 | 10:12 a.m.

    Hi David. Thank you for putting together this video! It's very interesting to see the contrast between the bioinformatics and wet-laboratory results. Did you find that any set of instructor strategies mentioned above led to better scores than others?

    I also wonder what strategies the bioinformatics instructors may have implemented with the transition to online labs. Our video features an instructor for a virtual engineering lab that saw positive results when implementing inclusive teaching practices.

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 12, 2021 | 11:39 a.m.

    Hi Thomas,

    Thanks for your kind comments. Your follow-up question is interesting and to an extent you point out the first issue that needs to be solved. It is true that overall, the strategies I mentioned were used. but as in your comment, this is not a univariate decision. In other words, these were the main strategies but they were combined with other sets of teaching approaches and techniques. I have employed a post-doc to do some qualitative analysis of the teachers written descriptions of their teaching and it is my plan to come back and analysis some of the outcomes in relation to clusters of teaching approaches. The short answer to your question is that I haven't done the analysis yet; the longer answer is that it is in the works if we can find good clustering of teaching codes and we have enough participants in each group.

    Sorry for the unsatisfying answer. But indeed this is something that needs to be explored.

    Thanks David

     

  • Icon for: Thomas Veague

    Thomas Veague

    Community Engagement Manager
    May 12, 2021 | 01:17 p.m.

    Hi David,

    Thanks for the detailed note. It's very interesting work and best of luck on the next phase!

    Thomas

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 12, 2021 | 01:26 p.m.

    Thanks Thomas

  • Icon for: Rivka Glaser

    Rivka Glaser

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2021 | 11:12 a.m.

    Thank you for this video!  The Genomics Education Partnership (https://stemforall2021.videohall.com/presentati... offers CREs that can be done either digitally or in person as well and we saw that the digital CREs were very well suited to online instruction.  I was very interested to see your data on the effectiveness of the bioinformatics CREs!

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 12, 2021 | 11:41 a.m.

    Hello Rivka,

    Thanks for this comment. I am very glad there is some corroborating evidence here. It is always a problem if the outcomes are more general - but all the data comes from one program (even if that program is very varied in terms of population and institution). Glad to hear that our results sync with yours,

    David

     

     

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 12, 2021 | 11:46 a.m.

    Hello Rivka (again),

    I just watched your video and indeed there is overlap in the types of content in the program. I was not sure what you were using for outcome data in terms of student research experience. But I thought I would direct you to the tool we developed. Here is the link:

    https://www.lifescied.org/doi/full/10.1187/cbe....

    It might offer you some additional options. I hope this is useful. If you have questions don't hesitate to ask.

    David

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Icon for: Sharon Gusky

    Sharon Gusky

    Researcher
    May 12, 2021 | 11:32 a.m.

    Thank you for this video and information. As a SEA-PHAGES participant working with my students on the bioinformatics unit when the pandemic hit, I was glad that the research easily transitioned to online. My students enjoyed being able to continue their research without disruption.

  • Icon for: David Hanauer

    David Hanauer

    Lead Presenter
    Professor of Applied Linguistics
    May 12, 2021 | 11:53 a.m.

    Hello Sharon,

    It is always nice to speak to a fellow SEA-PHAGES faculty. Thank you for the endorsement of the findings of this study. I hope to see you at the upcoming SEA Teachers meeting where I will present more information about our educational research in the SEA.

    Cheers David

     

  • Icon for: Neela White

    Neela White

    Facilitator
    Project Director
    May 12, 2021 | 02:53 p.m.

    Thank you for this video submission.  You briefly spoke about this in your reply to Alexander, but I wondered about hybrid models?  I was not sure whether any of your institutions offered hybrid-learning and if you found similar results for students who had a hybrid research experience?

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