1495 Views
  1. Janelle Johnson
  2. Associate Professor-STEM Education
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Metropolitan State University of Denver
  1. Kay Bolerjack
  2. STEAM Teacher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  1. Brittany Brown
  2. Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver
  1. Dawn Cummings
  2. Assistant Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Community College of Denver
  1. Mariana Enriquez
  2. External Evaluator
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Metropolitan State University of Denver
  1. Kate Goss
  2. Teacher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. St. Vrain Montessori School
  1. Julie Pitz
  2. Teacher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Colorado STEM Academy
  1. Lexii Rotunda
  2. Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver
  1. Rich Wagner
  2. Professor of Meteorology
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Metropolitan State University of Denver

A Community-based Approach to Engaging Students and Teachers in Effective ST...

NSF Awards: 1615193

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades K-6, Grades 6-8, Grades 9-12, Undergraduate, Adult learners

This video documents three years of work on an ITEST grant that represents a collaboration between Metropolitan State University of Denver, Community College of Denver, GLOBE, and University of New Hampshire. Our work has focused on broadening access to STEM pathways for students and families who are underrepresented in STEM opportunities. The video shares an overview of our project components--workshops for preservice and inservice elementary and secondary teachers, near peer mentorship of K-12 students by college students, and STEM career expos. 

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Kate Goss

    Kate Goss

    Co-Presenter
    May 4, 2020 | 09:16 a.m.

    One particularly useful aspect of this program was protocol training with an embedded focus on engaging focal students through hands-on, meaningful work. Teachers came away with immediately applicable tools and resources which, in my classes, did result in significantly more engagement among students who had previously felt alienated from science. 

     
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    Lexii Rotunda
    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 4, 2020 | 07:08 p.m.

    Welcome to our page! We're so glad you're here. We are a team of faculty, students, and teachers. We have co-developed this project over the past three years and really enjoy learning from each other to focus on better meeting our students' needs. 

    Please consider the following discussion prompts: 

    • What does STEM equity look like in your work?
    • If the approach described here helps you think about practices to try out in your own work, please describe them.
    • What aspects of this work are you interested in learning more about?

    Check out some of our padlets. See the attached link. You can search for other padlets through my name. Summer 2019 Institute Please comment if you have any questions or feedback on the padlets.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Rich Wagner

    Rich Wagner

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 11:06 a.m.

    We are grateful for the expertise of classroom teachers for testing and verifying approaches that truly enhance engagement, skills, and knowledge for their students.  Teachers really value the opportunity to collaborate and learn from each other, adapting shared experiences to enrich their own unique classroom interactions.  Dr. Richard Wagner, Project co-PI

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Overtoun Jenda

    Overtoun Jenda

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 01:14 p.m.

    Very interesting. Have you collected any data that may show the program's impact on student attitude towards STEM or their willingness to go college and major in STEM?

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kay Bolerjack

    Kay Bolerjack

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:35 p.m.

    I am one of the elementary teachers that participated in the Grant.  We gave out surveys to the students at the end of the school year to see if it impacted their thinking and choices for careers, it's difficult to assure their college focus at this age, but many have voiced interest.  This year we did field testing with some of the college students leading the experiments, This had a great impact on many students attitudes toward STEM and the roles of those professionals.

    Kay 

     
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    Kate Goss
    Mariana Enriquez
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 06:12 p.m.

    Hello Overtoun,

    I am the evaluator of the MULTI program. You probably already read Kay’s comment about data that teachers have collected from their students. We have not formally collected data directly from the students as part of the evaluation of the program, however, we have asked participating teachers whether they have noticed any changes in their students since attending the PD workshops. We know these are not “hard” data, but we also know that teachers’ attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy) and their change in pedagogical practice, are mediators of changes in their students. The following are a few of the responses collected from teachers who attended the 2019 MULTI Summer Institute.

    The specific question was: Have you seen changes on your students since you have been attending these MULTI workshops and what changes have you seen?

    A handful of teachers’ responses:

    “Absolutely! I have seen their confidence grow and the way they are participating in class.”

    “I have seen my students be more engaged in science. They are asking more questions and genuinely want to investigate further into what we are learning. I also have more students identifying STEM careers when we talk about what they want to be when they grow up.”

    “We do more work with labs, data, and analysis as it relates to the scientific process.”

    "Yes- we did our first protocol practice trip in May with 4th years and the ownership, problem solving, and recognition of this being the right approach was phenomenal. At the end of the field experience I asked the students if they found it meaningful and if we should continue next year- and took a photo of the entire class raising their hands. I didn't notice until I was printing the photos that many students raised both hands- and those with both hands would easily fall under a focal student umbrella."

     
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    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Stacey Forsyth

    Stacey Forsyth

    Informal Educator
    May 6, 2020 | 04:04 p.m.

    Hi Janelle, It's great to learn more about your project! Thanks for sharing the link to the Padlets - Can you share more about how you've used that tool to support the cohorts of teachers participating in the project? Is it primarily used during the PD workshops, or do teachers continue to contribute additional resources to the padlets as they implement the program in their classrooms? It seems like it could be a useful tool for helping to maintain community among participants as well as to share useful resources and best practices. My organization is preparing to shift our K-12 STEM programs to a remote format for this summer and we're planning to use Padlet as one of our online tools. I would love to hear more about what's worked well for you in the course of your project. 

     
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    Janelle Johnson
    Mariana Enriquez
    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 05:55 p.m.

    Hi Stacey,

    I just shared some data collected from MULTI participating teachers on how they are using Padlet. My comment is below, hopefully this is useful and helps answer your questions.

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 6, 2020 | 04:43 p.m.

    Hi Stacey, thanks for asking about the Padlets. They are used during the PD and then as a planning resource for teachers once they're back in their classrooms. I agree with you about its potential to maintain community; our strategies for that have been regularly scheduled workshops, online water coolers, and newsletters. The teachers have talked about how they benefit by connecting with teachers from other grade levels and districts, and both preservice and inservice teachers have expressed how much they appreciate connecting with each other. 

     
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    Kate Goss
    Mariana Enriquez
    Sasha Palmquist
    Stacey Forsyth
  • Icon for: Sasha Palmquist

    Sasha Palmquist

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 09:42 p.m.

    Hi Janelle (and team!), 

    I really enjoyed learning about your project through this video! This was the first time I have seen Padlets and I can see great potential for them across a program life cycle. To follow up on Stacey's post, I am curious whether the padlets are "living documents" that teachers continuously update and revise? I am very interested to learn more about how the project team and the participants use this tool.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 05:53 p.m.

    Hi Sasha and Stacey,

    I'm the evaluator of MULTI. Data we collected from teachers participating in the workshops indicate that they use Padlet as a repository of resources that they use to develop their lessons (objectives, content). They also use it to share resources with their peers. Often times only one teacher from a given school was able to attend the workshops, so they took back resources to their buildings through Padlet. Teachers mentioned that they also use it to communicate with their students. Some of them also found Padlet to be a better alternative than other platforms.

    Here are three quotes collected during the 2019 MULTI Summer Institute, on how they use Padlet:

    "I have used Padlet to communicate with my students and them with each other (and me) in a science research seminar on particulate matter, radon, and carbon monoxide monitoring.  I posted the protocols and how-to videos and students shared their research questions and experimental design.  I thought it was easier to upload information to than Google Classroom, where things got buried according to date posted.  My current project uses a website-based approach, but the information is one-way.  Padlet is information sharing both-ways."

    "I learned about this resource through this training. I can see that it is a valuable asset to present a collection of resources or prompt engagement between peers. I would use Padlet as a way to share timely and relevant digital resources with students. The ability to share comments in Padlet can allow for clarification of information or even enhance peer to peer interactions."

    "I use padlet to share information with my class. I use padlet to document students' preconceived notions at the beginning of a unit or lesson."

    I hope this is useful information about the versatility and usefulness of Padlet.

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Jennifer Bourgeault

    Jennifer Bourgeault

    United States GLOBE Country Coordinator
    May 12, 2020 | 05:57 p.m.

    After seeing the way that Padlet was used on this project, I brought it back to PD in New Hampshire. It is a great way for multiple facilitators to link to all their resources and content in one place before the workshop. Then as questions come up, add others. Teachers can also add their own lessons and links to share with the group. This has been particularly powerful when group members have different areas of experience and expertise. Teachers can then 'remake' the Padlet as their own and add other resources or lessons. That is what I have seen happen with the teachers we work with here. They can delete things that are not relevant and share it with others. It makes for an effective hub that each person tailors to make it useful to them. It can also be used during a virtual meeting in combination with breakout rooms and sharing one Padlet. Breakout groups each have a column to add their comments and links during discussion questions and the comments expanded, combined and edited with the larger group later.

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kate Goss

    Kate Goss

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:54 p.m.

    Hi Sasha,

    What a great question! As a teacher who has really benefited from this program, I can share my experience. I've gone back to the Padlets frequently for resources both from the original training and from documents others post in their comments.

    The Padlets also an excellent communication tool as I bring the PD back to share with my head of school and then develop programming and local teacher training around many of the ideas and resources. So they also live in this sense.

     
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    Jennifer Bourgeault
    Lexii Rotunda
    Janelle Johnson
    Mariana Enriquez
    Kay Bolerjack
  • Icon for: Sarah Krejci

    Sarah Krejci

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 7, 2020 | 10:47 a.m.

    This is a very great framework for bridging the gap between colleges and teachers to create STEM career pathways for students! This is something I see as an application in our county.

    Did the NSF grant support stipends for teachers to participate in the workshops and summer field experiences? We all know how overworked our teachers are! How were you able to encourage them to take the extra time for this kind of professional development outside of the classroom?

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kay Bolerjack

    Kay Bolerjack

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 12:01 p.m.

    My elementary students have participated in water testing activities with college students and I think it is very powerful for helping students choose career paths.  My son is a biologist who has seen some of the work our group has done and he highly advocates the process as a way to help students envision themselves in STEM careers.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Dawn Cummings

    Dawn Cummings

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 11:13 a.m.

    YES!  Our team recognizes teachers as the professionals that they are and they are always compensated for their time!  We provided stipends for teachers participation in ALL of these activities.  

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kay Bolerjack

    Kay Bolerjack

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 03:32 p.m.

    I would agree, having the ability to pay participants is helpful to teachers, our time is very busy and getting compensated for learning strategies is rewarding.

     
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    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 7, 2020 | 01:26 p.m.

    Hi Sarah, to echo Dawn's response, we were super grateful to have the funding for teacher stipends. We also wrote subsistence into our budget so we could provide nice lunches during full day sessions. Teachers are absolutely overworked and they really appreciated those small gestures. We also did polling to figure out the best days and times to offer half day workshops. Our group preferred Saturday mornings from 9-12. 

     
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    Heidi Carlone
    Mariana Enriquez
    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Julie Pitz

    Julie Pitz

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 10:49 a.m.

    Hi Sasha and Stacy,

    I am a teacher who has participated in this program for a few years and the I use the Padlets on a regular basis to plan Science activities and units in my class. It is so helpful to have one central place to access this information. I can easily go back and find the exact resource I need. 

     
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    Jennifer Bourgeault
    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: DeeDee Wright

    DeeDee Wright

    Graduate Student
    May 8, 2020 | 12:32 p.m.

    This is fabulous work! What sticks out to me as being important is (1)the experiences teachers that increases their confidence to provide similar experiences in their classroom, and (2)the inclusion of undergraduates to begin building professional relationships with other educators.

     
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    Lexii Rotunda
    Janelle Johnson
    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Kate Goss

    Kate Goss

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 12:38 p.m.

    It was also a major point of connection to have college students come engage with my 5th grade class, and train them in benthic macroinvertebrate collection and identification. Their engagement and learning, not to mention retention, increased- as did how they valued their field work.

     
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    Lexii Rotunda
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Dawn Cummings

    Dawn Cummings

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 03:01 p.m.

    The opportunity for the college students to speak at the teacher workshops and to mentor the young students in science was quite empowering for them! It gave them more confidence and they could really  see themselves as scientists through that experience!

     
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    Jennifer Bourgeault
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Jeanne Reis

    Jeanne Reis

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 03:46 p.m.

    Wow, this project does a wonderful job of combining teacher training, real world issues, PBL, and technology that supports instruction. I'll be looking at the Padlet resources, thank you for sharing them!

    My team provided training to pre-service and in-service teachers related to watersheds (and I agree that stipends and meals during training are a must to appreciate their time and effort). Our teachers did have increased confidence and understanding of the topic while in training, but struggled more than they anticipated when back in the classroom. We are looking into how to support teachers in a more sustained way so they don't flounder at those critical moments.

    Did you observe a similar phenomenon with your participants, or no? If not, do you think there was something specific about the design of your program that ensured teachers had sufficient tools, knowledge and confidence to teach the topics in their classrooms? 

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 9, 2020 | 11:30 a.m.

    Jeanne these are great questions. The teachers who are co-presenters here are the ones who are MOST engaged. : ) We've been working to support them as teacher leaders to support other teachers since they can more directly relate. Following the example of GLOBE US Country Coordinator Jen Bourgeault, we have begun producing teacher-led water coolers where they can share how they are implementing things in their own classroom and field questions from other teachers. 

    Regarding the tools, one strategy we've found works well is to have a range of tools and resources available and then do a drawing at the end of the session. It helps teachers pick things they know they need and can use with their grade level standards. 

    Another aspect of MULTI STEM that teachers have been super responsive to is our sense of community during professional development. When we first started our project, we noticed how reluctant the teachers were to claim expertise, and we knew that was something we had to specifically target. We typically start out with some kind of icebreaker related to the session topic, and teachers work in small groups so they feel safe asking questions. Facilitators are participant observers, so they engage right along with the teachers. It's a very welcoming environment and we have lots of fun! 

     
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    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Lexii Rotunda

    Lexii Rotunda

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 07:36 p.m.

    As one of the undergraduate college students that participates, it has been an incredible experience learning how to apply field sessions with the teachers and students. They always say the best way to learn is when you teach somebody else, and being able to get this experience under my belt has really helped with my comprehension of material! The questions that the students ask makes you look at a project in a different light. They're attitude and willingness to learn have been non-stop impressive since I have been helping with this program. I always felt that I would have went into science sooner if I had outlets such as this within my school system when I was younger. I am just very happy to be apart of this, and I hope that I can inspire a young mind to follow the path of STEM!

     
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    Alex DeCiccio
    Dawn Cummings
    Janelle Johnson
    Jeanne Reis
    Kate Goss
    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Brittany Brown

    Brittany Brown

    Co-Presenter
    May 9, 2020 | 12:00 a.m.

    Thank you to everyone who has made this program possible! As one of the undergraduate college students, it is such an honor to be able to participate in something so important. We engage in classroom and field STEM activities with K-12 students and teachers. We have helped while classes are midway through their own research; as well as taught classes new concepts to utilize in their experiments. Each time the experience is so inspiring! Witnessing the confidence and excitement of the students being able to command their own projects, while seeing the pride reflected in their teachers is really quite special. I was absolutely blown away by all of the student presenters at the Multi Globe Research Showcase in February 2020. Giving students the tools to work with STEM at a young age is visibly empowering for them. This provides resources for youth to think ahead about their futures while interacting with college level STEM researchers. The importance of doing hands-on STEM activities with peers not only engages the students more in what they are currently doing, but they then ask questions about what its like doing these things at a college level, thus envisioning themselves in their own future involving STEM. Being able to share the opportunities a STEM career has given myself to these leaders of tomorrow has been so fun and rewarding, and I am so grateful to participate in the work we do!

     
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    Kay Bolerjack
    Janelle Johnson
    Jeanne Reis
    Kate Goss
    Dawn Cummings
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 9, 2020 | 12:13 p.m.

    Thanks Lexii and Brittany! I just wanted to clarify that their roles are as undergraduate research assistants. (We also have undergraduate student participants who are preservice teachers.) These and other students took Dawn Cummings' amazing field biology class and developed a real passion for and connection to STEM, as both students mention. The students had an important leadership role in various aspects of the project. They spoke on panels about how transformative hands-on science learning had been for them in terms of career trajectories, often despite facing many barriers; they led workshops for teachers during the summer institutes; and they visited our MULTI STEM teachers and their students in schools to help with data collection and analysis while also serving as near-peer mentors. Many of these elementary and secondary students' research posters explicitly thank Brittany and Lexii for their help!

    Sometimes undergraduates are overlooked, but these students are a prime example of meeting and exceeding high expectations. We could not have done this project without them!

     
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    Jennifer Bourgeault
    Kate Goss
    Dawn Cummings
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 9, 2020 | 11:31 a.m.

    DeeDee you hit the nail on the head. And both of those very key pieces emerged during the project.

  • Icon for: Rich Wagner

    Rich Wagner

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 01:56 p.m.

    Great to hear from Brittany and Lexii. As I reflect on the project, I am truly amazed at the intellectual and career growth of our undergraduate and post-bac research assistants.  Roseanne, Yoko, Becca, Jerry, Tyler and many others have made lasting contributions to our teacher participants. I’m not sure how we have been so lucky.  

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: DeLene Hoffner

    DeLene Hoffner

    K-12 Teacher
    May 11, 2020 | 05:32 p.m.

    Janelle- I was so happy to see your project in this video showcase.  Way to go!  I really love all your group has accomplished.  Very impressive!  

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 12, 2020 | 10:07 a.m.

    Thanks DeLene! This is such a cool way to share the work and learn about other projects. I’m glad but not surprised to see you’re involved. :-)

  • Icon for: Kate Goss

    Kate Goss

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 09:52 a.m.

    One last thought as a teacher who has benefited from this program: it is still paying dividends even during distance learning.

    My 5th grade students needed to pivot from their end of year symposium, but this delay has let them chose a protocol related to their research question and create a training slideshow for next year's crew. Many of them are including, and building upon, techniques learned directly from the undergraduate students during their watershed training- as well as training I received from this program and passed on to them. (One focal student is actually tackling building a benthic macroinvertebrate library for our stretch of the local watershed, which stems from a presenter at the recent showcase.)

    These slideshows will be printed into training manuals, which we will use in classes or if students check out equipment for distance learning. They are incredibly engaged.

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 12, 2020 | 10:08 a.m.

    Capacity building on multiple levels!

  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor-STEM Education
    May 12, 2020 | 10:19 a.m.

    You may have noticed a thread about “focal students.” This is a strengths-based approach we use with teachers during professional development. We ask them to think about a few specific students who have been less engaged in STEM...students with less self efficacy, English learners, shy students, students with IEPs, kids who don’t want to “look smart,” etc. At the end of each hands-on segment, we ask teachers to reflect on how the activity would have gone with their focal students, and if anything would need to be modified. Teachers often realize that focal students benefit the MOST from engaging hands-on learning, though they typically have the least access to it. We have lots of data from teachers on how this practice has been transformative for them in terms of STEM equity

     
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    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Rich Wagner

    Rich Wagner

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 12:33 p.m.

    Our emphasis on “focal students” has evolved from a reflection at the end of a workshop to more frequent contemplation and sharing.  As teachers use this lens for curriculum planning and implementation more frequently, the lens becomes a permanent fixture. STEM equity then evolves from a desire to intentional adaptation and finally to routine reflexivepractice. 

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kay Bolerjack

    Kay Bolerjack

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 03:24 p.m.

    I would add that the emphasis on Focal students has made me think about that as I am developing lessons and content for students.  It is difficult for me not to consider the adaptations as I work.  I think the idea of equity was always on my mind but it is now in the forefront.  I believe equity is an important element of STEAM because of the nature of the work that can be attainable for all learning styles and needs.

     
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    Kate Goss
    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Jennifer Bourgeault

    Jennifer Bourgeault

    United States GLOBE Country Coordinator
    May 12, 2020 | 06:06 p.m.

    Hi Kay! So glad to see you again even if it is virtual! I have been thinking about focal students alot as schools moved to remote learning. To the teacher co-presenters...Have you found that the focal students you centered on during face-to-face classroom learning are the same ones that you centered on during remote learning? Have you added some focal students or found that some of your focal students have done better in this environment?

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Kay Bolerjack

    Kay Bolerjack

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 06:38 p.m.

    Hi Jennifer,

    It is good to see you too. The short answer is yes and yes.  Some of the younger focal students who had a difficult time with group dynamics, social distractions have actually done better, it may be the presence of parents and less distractions or social anxiety is lessened.  But for others remote learning presents such challenge that they may become more distant (literally and figuratively).  As for teaching STEAM remotely the concern of materials, support and ability have added to the challenges.  I have worked one on one with kids in zoom meetings trying to help them access materials and understand how to do things.  But for some kids remote learning presents other challenges that are difficult to help with, such as motivation, since many elementary kids are very social and thrive in a environment with their peers.  We are doing the best we can to help them through this.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Bourgeault

    Jennifer Bourgeault

    United States GLOBE Country Coordinator
    May 12, 2020 | 06:47 p.m.

    Thank you for your observations and your work during these challenging times. I can only imagine what is like to try and adapt to this environment, and on such short notice.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Bourgeault

    Jennifer Bourgeault

    United States GLOBE Country Coordinator
    May 12, 2020 | 06:14 p.m.

    As a member of this team, I have benefited from being a participant observer during the PD in Denver every year. This opportunity was a way for me to see and experience how a particular strategy (participant observer, focal students, Dawn's students presenting as a panel and Padlet particularly) could be helpful in my own work. I was changed by this experience. I was able to collaborate with my colleagues and incredible teachers. It was truly a team or group experience where we were all learning from each other.

     
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    Kay Bolerjack
    Janelle Johnson
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