1927 Views
  1. Raffaella Borasi
  2. Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Rochester
  1. Zenon Borys
  2. Assistant Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Rochester
  1. Cynthia Callard
  2. https://www.warner.rochester.edu/facultystaff/who/callard
  3. Professor and Executive Director of the Center for Professional Development and Education Reform
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Rochester
  1. Michael Daley
  2. https://www.warner.rochester.edu/facultystaff/who/michaeldaley
  3. Assistant Professor in the Center for Professional Development and Education Reform
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Rochester
  1. Yu Jung Han
  2. Graduate Assistant
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Rochester
  1. Dave Miller
  2. https://www.warner.rochester.edu/facultystaff/who/miller
  3. Associate Professor and Associate Director for K-12 Education in the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Rochester
  1. michael Occhino
  2. Director of Science Outreach in the Center for Professional Development and Education Reform
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Rochester
Facilitators’
Choice

Developing STEM Master Teachers to Lead Digital Conversion in K-12 Schools

NSF Awards: 1758243

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Graduate, Adult learners

The Developing STEM Master Teachers to Lead Digital Conversion in K-12 Schools Noyce project is preparing a cadre of 20 “digitally-rich” master teachers.  Our goal is to leverage the potential of digital technologies to improve STEM teaching, while also capitalizing on K-12 districts’ interest in instructional technologies as a catalyst for change.  To maximize their impact on systemic reform, participants come from seven high-need districts within the K-12 Digital Consortium - a partnership between the Center for Learning in the Digital Age at the University of Rochester (UR), local BOCES and over 20 school districts committed to technology integration. The project also benefits from a partnership between the Rochester Museum & Science Center and the UR education school and STEM departments.  

The project’s first two years were devoted to preparing Fellows to leverage technology in ways that truly transform their STEM classrooms.  To achieve this goal, we designed a sequence of three semester-long graduate level courses, along with a Practicum experience supported by mentors.  The sequence purposefully started with a course revisiting foundational goals, principles and practices about learning and teaching STEM.  The second course focused on using digital technologies to enhance specific teaching practices, with a focus on assessment, conveying content, making thinking visible, promoting collaborative learning, and differentiating instruction. The third course aimed at uncovering the power of specific technologies to transform not only how we teach, but also what we teach in STEM.  Our video features this course sequence, bringing in both designers and participants’ perspectives.

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 4, 2020 | 03:56 p.m.

    School closures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have raised awareness about the potential of digital technologies to support teaching and learning, not only in this time of crisis but also when coming back to what will be a “new normal” for K-12 schools.  Yet this potential can be realized only if teachers are able to capitalize on it.

    This, in turn, calls for effective professional learning programs focusing on digitally-rich teaching, as well as developing teacher leaders that can promote and support technology-rich instructional innovations. Our current Noyce Master Teaching Fellowship (MTF) program, launched in summer 2018, was designed to achieve these very goals – even before the emergency created by COVID-19.  As we just completed the component of our program designed to empower our MTFs to leverage technology to truly “transform” their own STEM teaching, we’d love to share what we learned from this experience.

    The video introduces the rationale and key structure of the graduate Advanced Certificate in Digitally-Rich Teaching in K-12 School program we specifically adapted for our MTFs.  You can find more information about the program on our project website (http://urnoyce.org/digitally-rich-projectoverview/).  We are happy to answer any questions you may have about this program – or any other aspects of our Noyce MTF project – in this online discussion.

    We are also eager to hear about YOUR thoughts as well as experiences with preparing STEM “digitally-rich” teachers, especially as they relate to the following questions:     

    • What does it mean to use technology in ways that “transform” STEM teaching and learning?
    • What are key challenges that may hinder STEM teachers’ capacity to leverage this potential?
    • What principles should inform programs preparing STEM teachers to leverage this potential?
    • What learning experiences did you try out in your program to prepare digitally-rich STEM teachers? What worked, what did not work, and why? 
    • What new questions did our video raise for you?
     
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    CarlaDean Caldera
    michael Occhino
    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Qinqin Xiao

    Qinqin Xiao

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 09:54 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing the website and presentations with us. Dr. Borasi!!

    It is a door for me to see the STEM in K-12.

     
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    Dave Miller
    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Karl Kosko

    Karl Kosko

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 4, 2020 | 04:46 p.m.

    I'm considering your second question about what are the challenges for STEM teachers' capacity here. For me, it is simply the cost and availability of equipment. Many teachers may not realize how affordable certain tools can be (i.e., that TinkerCad is free, and AR can be integrated with this without having to purchase a 3D printer... or that there are very inexpernsive 180/360 cameras and/or headsets). So, it seems that the availability of such resources and/or knowledge of available resources can be both a facilitator and a hindrance.

    We are currently using 360 video to create immersive experiences for our future teachers. We are also considering what it may mean for teachers to create content for online teaching (given COVID-19 and a need for more blended learning). We've also found use of this technology to help contextualize use of other STEM related technology (such as using 360 video of students learning to code with robots before preservice teachers learn to use such robots themselves). 

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Dave Miller

    Dave Miller

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 08:59 a.m.

    Thanks for the comment, Karl.  I checked out your project, and it's fascinating.  Thanks for connecting. Shared a comment on your page.

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Michael Daley

    Michael Daley

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:04 a.m.

    Karl, 

    Thanks for sharing and I particularly agree that awareness of the accessibility of tools can be a hindrance. For example, in our spring course we introduced teachers to Tinkercad, 3-D files, and augmented reality. We spent about 45 minutes in class engaging teachers in different 3-D experiences. We had dinosaurs walking around the room, models of the Earth on a Merge Cube, and even an AR math activity with GeoGebra. The experience was exciting for teachers but it still seemed inaccessible to many of them. We transitioned from this F2F experience to an online module and required teachers to create a 3-D design. We provided a few short tutorial videos and encouraged teachers to use Tinkercad. Some teachers made augmented reality projects while others made shapes to be printed and used as a manipulative in class. The ideas teachers came up with were outstanding! For me, it was great to see teachers reflect on this experience and recognize how accessible this technology can be. Many teachers had assumed augmented reality and 3-D shapes required lots of coding knowledge. This is not the case as there are now so many tools and apps that make engaging with this technology fairly straightforward.

     
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    CarlaDean Caldera
    michael Occhino
    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Kim Koin

    Kim Koin

    Informal Educator
    May 6, 2020 | 09:59 a.m.

    Hi Michael,

    I love this example of iterating on the teaching and learning methods your project was using with your master teachers. I'm taking away the idea of differentiated learning here: seems like through an online module, teachers could absorb and interact with the new digital experiences at their own pace. The requirement of making a 3-D design would seem to help teachers jump right in a use the digital tools, a great way to engage so many modes of thinking and learning! In our space at Chicago Children's Museum, we are working with a different audience (children and their families) and different tech (hammers, saws, power drills), but we have seen the same deep engagement when we give our participants a clear but open-ended directive (such as "make something that rolls") and give them the time and space to engage with the tools in the space. (The best way to learn how to use a hammer is to... try and use the hammer).

    And thank you and your team for your timely work on digital learning! I know I'll be digging into this more into my own work.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:27 p.m.

    Thank you for watching our video and for your comment, Kim.  I just watched your video and really appreciate the work that you are doing to support student and family engagement in your space at Chicago Children's Museum.  Really interesting findings that "the design of tinkering activities can boost the amount of engineering and other STEM-related talk among children and their caregivers."  

    While we did not talk about this aspect of our project (given the 3 minute limit!), one of our partners is the Rochester Museum and Science Center, and we have discussed what we as educators can learn from students' engagement in these informal learning spaces, and also what we can contribute to help making these informal spaces more robust for students' and families' STEM learning.

    We will definitely be interested in following your findings and connecting to incorporate these types of experiences for students and families in our science center!

  • Icon for: Wing Cheung

    Wing Cheung

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 4, 2020 | 05:34 p.m.

    I am also considering your second question as I have been trying to encourage STEM teachers to leverage new technologies (geospatial technologies) in their classrooms. One of the main concerns I have heard is the lack of class time to incorporate new technologies or contents beyond the established standards.  

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Dave Miller

    Dave Miller

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:00 a.m.

    Hi Wing, and thanks for the comment. I viewed your video, and I'm intrigued with the community outreach that your team has generated for this project. Nice ties to STEM and career engagement. 

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Michael Daley

    Michael Daley

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:28 a.m.

    Wing,

    It is great to hear you are encouraging the use of geospatial technology in classrooms. My background is in geography and I know how powerful this technology can be in supporting meaningful learning experiences. We do hear comments quite regularly from teachers and administrators about the lack of time to implement new technology as it is perceived as taking away from learning towards state standards. From a science perspective, NGSS has been helpful as many of the performance expectations mention technology. The framing of the practices of science in NGSS has also been helpful to encourage more technology use. The key to reform in science will be in how the state assessments are designed.

     
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    michael Occhino
    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Angela Hwang

    Angela Hwang

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 5, 2020 | 01:25 p.m.

    Thanks for the comment Dave! Your project is very interesting! What have been the challenges and successes with your teachers as they integrate technology in the classroom. More specifically, what type of support do you give to the teacher as they on board the new tech, as well as implement into the classroom?

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Dave Miller

    Dave Miller

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 02:35 p.m.

    Wow, big question, Angela! And thank you for asking it.  I will also prompt my colleagues to jump in to the response to share, as they view & engage with our showcase. Successes range from new ways of thinking about practice at the intersection with digital tools and digitally-rich practices to sharing of MTF expertise with other faculty in cohort school districts.  Challenges have come to the forefront with the transition to remote / distance learning in a time of crisis, and supports we provide range from the classroom conversations, leadership seminars for the MTFs, to our Center for Learning in the Digital Age at Warner, the K-12 Digital Consoritum that emanated from collaborative work with regional school districts and the Center for Learning in the Digital Age, and the terrific work that originates from the Center for Professional Development and Education Reform - all housed within the Warner School.

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Zenon Borys

    Zenon Borys

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:56 p.m.
    Hi Angela,  Thanks for the question and I’ll chime in with some other details.  As you can imagine there have been lots of both — challenges and successes.  One of the main challenges is having teachers with varied access to technology.  Most of the districts and fellows we work with are in different places as it relates to digital conversions and other tech. in the buildings (e.g. some with makerspaces).  This made it difficult to focus on one technology or tool to spend time with, the variety kept it realistic and gave fellows lessons to learn from each other.  The practicum experience has been a key support in having fellows implement digitally-rich teaching practices.  Part of the practicum is creating a portfolio showing proficiency in key practices, like implementing a new digital resource.  The practicum spans a couple semesters and each fellow gets to work in their context and share the lessons they learned with a larger group.  In this way we try to give the fellows extended time, multiple experiences, and productive framework to approach these ideas in their unique contexts.   
     
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    Dave Miller
  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:56 p.m.

    Hi Angela.  Thank you for your thoughtful question!  I will add to my colleagues' responses to include another aspect of our project not shared in the video (3-minutes is short!), which is mentoring support.  Each of our fellows in this "Master Teacher Fellows" program actually has an experienced STEM teacher/project staff member as a mentor to be their thinking partner and collaborator as they work to make shifts in their instructional practices including the incorporation of technology to enhance and transform learning.

    This is based on our belief that ALL of us can use a mentor/coach to continually improve our practice, no matter how long we have been teaching.  We believe this is important in supporting fellows to try new technologies for specific math and science learning goals in their classrooms.  Mentors will also support fellows in their development as teacher leaders supporting digitally-rich instruction as they work to impact not just their own classrooms, but their colleagues.

    Just thought I'd share this as you asked about support for the teachers as they "on board" and try out new technologies to advance students' mathematics and science learning.

    (And I am going to watch your video now! :) )

  • Icon for: Susan Kowalski

    Susan Kowalski

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 05:36 p.m.

    I enjoyed seeing examples of how your master teachers are using technology to great effect in their classrooms. Have you investigated whether the master teachers are inspiring their colleagues at their own schools? What is the impact beyond the master teachers and their students?

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Nicole Charles

    Nicole Charles

    May 7, 2020 | 11:26 a.m.

    Hi Susan, I'm one of the fellows in the program so I can speak a bit to your question with regards to experiences at my own district.  Our district leadership has intentionally built capacity for effective technology integration through implementing a number of initiatives.  For example, teachers who have more experience effectively utilizing technology in their classrooms host "learning labs" several times throughout the year.  Substitute teachers are booked and teachers are given release time to observe a digitally rich lesson in a colleague's classroom.   Other times, we do a "travelling learning lab," where a substitute is booked for my classroom and I go teach a digitally rich lesson directly in a colleague's classroom.  Specific protocols for following up with colleagues post-lesson have been articulated and there is additional support available for colleagues who desire to try something new.  Additionally, our district has hosted what we call a "digifest," for the past couple of summers.  This is a series of professional development days that is hosted by teachers, for teachers.  We are all strongly encouraged to submit proposals for technology topics that we can teach and then we design a presentation that meets the needs of our peers.  It has been a lot of fun and I've enjoyed being both a participant and a presenter at our digifest days. 

    Lastly, the biggest source of inspiration for teachers to try new things comes from the culture we have built.  Effectively technology usage is modeled by administrators and there is very much a culture of trust and productive risk-taking.  I have always felt freedom to try something new, knowing that no matter how it went I always was given permission to learn from the experience and "fail forward."  

       
     
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    Dave Miller
    Amanda Gunning
  • Icon for: Amanda Gunning

    Amanda Gunning

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 7, 2020 | 02:42 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this, Nicole! I head up a MTF program for STEM and I think I will suggest this model to my Fellows, in case they might want to try to implement it for their leadership projects next year! Great job!

  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 5, 2020 | 07:51 p.m.

    Thanks for your comment, Susan.  Our MTF program was designed to focus for the first two years on further developing our participants' pedagogical practices, as the basis to build their credibility with their colleagues - as needed to play more leadership roles.  This was an important lesson we learned from our first MTF grant. 

    Since we just completed year 2, we have not "officially" entered the leadership preparation phase of the program.  That said, though, some of our Fellows have already started to spontaneously play some leadership in their schools - especially as their expertise in educational technology was recognized and tapped as everyone struggled with using technology during this time of school closure.

    I hope some of the Fellows and/or their mentors can add some specific examples in reply to your post.  

     
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    Qinqin Xiao
  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 08:41 a.m.

    I'd like to pick up on Raffaella's point about how the Fellows may have been tapped as having expertise in technology during this period of teachers providing learning experiences to students at a distance. Technologies used in the classroom setting do not always transfer easily to use at a distance. But beyond specific technologies, your Fellows have likely developed broader ways of thinking about how technology can support the learning processes in STEM. If you have any examples (antecdotally) of ways Fellows have supported their own stduents online or helped other teachers, please share.

  • Icon for: michael Occhino

    michael Occhino

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:29 a.m.

    Hello Hollyylynne,

    As you suggest, we consistently work to develop mindsets around technology in service to learning. in specific, what it means to be reform-minded STEM teachers. With this as our foundation you are correct that many fellows have developed broader ways of thinking about digitally rich tech integration in STEM. One example I have is a fellow who is developing a professional learning series for New York State Master Teachers (Not Noyce fellows) to be implemented this week using Schoology toward Mastery and Completion Learning. We continue to learn about other examples as time goes on.

  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 11, 2020 | 08:27 a.m.

    Thanks for the example of how one of your fellows is engaging others in a professional learning series about using Schoology. This is a nice example of a fellow transitioning to a leadership role!

    I also like the overall focus on reform-minded STEM teaching. Is there a specific framework or guiding principles that you all use to connect the teachers' experiences across the 3 courses?

  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 10:39 p.m.

    How have you researched/evaluated learning outcomes among both students and teachers in this project and what have been some (informal or formal) findings so far? Interested in the impacts on learning and/or motivation/affect toward technology if you are able to provide some data even if anecdotal at this point. Thanks!

  • Icon for: michael Occhino

    michael Occhino

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:40 a.m.

    This is a great question and one that we continue to wrestle with, as do our fellows. A component of research that has threaded through the project is teacher led. We have had our fellows develop "Problems of Practice (PoP)" (v.1 and currently v. 2) in which they engage in an action research project. This has led to fellows gaining a better understanding of the learning that happens in their classroom and many have focused on motivation (and autonomy specifically). Covid has disrupted the v.2 PoP but we will take it up again as soon as feasible. We expect to learn a great deal about tech integration and learning outcomes from these projects from both student learning and fellow learning. 

    Every phase of this project has reflection built in and we use this in our annual project evaluation. The sources come from fellows, instructors, mentors, and project leads.

     
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    Ann Cavallo
  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 11:59 a.m.

    Great that you built teacher research and reflection in to the project - I look forward to learning more about what you find as your program goes forward!

  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 6, 2020 | 08:27 a.m.

    Good question, Ann - but we are too early in the project to be able to address it, unfortunately.  I'm going to ask some of our Fellows if they are willing to speak to this question in a more anecdotal way, based on their own experiences. 

     
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    Ann Cavallo
  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 11:39 p.m.

    Thank you, Raffaella, I look forward to learning more about the outcomes of this project!

  • May 6, 2020 | 02:50 p.m.

    Michael,

     Since you asked about experiences, the hardest part of STEM for us was finding “where teachers are” in actual use of current technology use in professions and getting over their fears of using non-educational classroom versions of measurement practices. 

     

    What worked for us was to allow the teachers to work with tools they wanted to offer students then uniting the full project in comparison data collections that they were not responsible to manage but could learn from and join in with the broader project without worries that their part would be on a timeline or a focused piece of the initial project. 

     

    Creating 3 minute videos are hard to draw in viewers to the depth that we have to drill when discussing STEM and technology integration. Thanks for setting up the questions to start a longer body of shared thinking. Please visit our video and notice our sensors as we are moving from the building out to the field which proved to be great timing this unique year. 

    Betsy Stefany

     

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 09:03 p.m.

    Hi Betsy,

    Thank you for watching our video and for your comments.  I just watched your video and appreciate the opportunity for students to explore emerging digital tools like the use of the NASA Aeropod in support of a STEM Literacy Community of Practice.  Really interesting work.

    We have also been supporting our fellows to explore digital tools that would transform their math and science instruction.  This has been a big focus of the third course in the series described in the video.  We too are working to meet fellows and districts where they are with both use and access to technology, as well as introducing new possibilities.

    Exciting work in challenging times.  Thank you for watching!

  • Icon for: Monica VanDieren

    Monica VanDieren

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 6, 2020 | 06:48 p.m.

    Hi,

    I loved this presentation and was especially impressed with the sound design example.  What a great way to bring 3-dimensional reasoning and physics concepts into a problem that directly impacts the students every year at every auditorium production!  

    My team is also interested in several of the same questions that you asked.  We have a 3D graphing applet that some of your teachers may find useful.  Although its geared towards multivariable calculus, there are definitely high school topics that can be explored with the tool.  

    One of the obstacles we found in our research was teacher adaptation of the technology.  We found the TPACK framework useful to think about what may stand in the way of a teacher using a particular technology in the classroom.  In your experiences, what sort of obstacles did you find standing in the way of K12 teachers using a new piece of technology in the classroom?

    Thanks,

    Monica

     
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    michael Occhino
  • Small default profile

    Diane Savoie

    K-12 Teacher
    May 11, 2020 | 10:03 a.m.

    Hi Monica, I am a teacher in the program and have found that there is support among the teachers in the program to encourage experimenting with technology in our classrooms. Teachers also work with mentors that help with navigating and practicing new tech. For most k-12 teachers, having opportunities to experience new technology is a major obstacle. We are encouraged in the program to dive in and experience the messiness that may arise.

     
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    Dave Miller
  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 02:05 p.m.

    Thank you for your response Diane!

  • May 6, 2020 | 10:38 p.m.

    Great presentation. I really like hearing about the sequence of courses, and also seeing the different ways that teachers are incorporating their new expertise in their classroom. How are you going about measuring impact? Are you following teachers after they have finished the program to see how they continue to innovate? And are they taking leadership roles within their schools? Would love to invite your teacher to join our STEM teacher leadeship network (funded by NSF for teacher leaders) at STEMtlnet.org.

     

     
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    Michael I. Swart
  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 7, 2020 | 07:36 p.m.

    Thanks for the invitation to our MTFs to join STEMtlnet.org.  I recently participated in one of the webinars organized by this group around the role teacher leaders have played in supporting their colleagues - and students - in this time of disruption, and found it very valuable.  I will be following the online discussion following that event, and I hope some of our Fellows will do the same.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 10, 2020 | 10:05 a.m.

    Yes, thank you Joni!  We recently sent out information to our fellows about joining STEMtlnet.org as well.  Great resource to help support and sustain their work. 

    In terms of taking leadership roles now, we have purposefully spent these first two years of our project focusing on fellows own beliefs, understandings, and practices related to reform-minded STEM teaching and learning.  We have felt that it is important that fellows are grounded in the "why" as they work to shift their practices and influence others.  That being said, we also, from the beginning, work to support fellows' identities as leaders/influencers of others beyond their own classroom.  This will become foregrounded in our work in the next three years as we support fellows' communication, coaching, and professional learning skills.  

    In addition, many fellows are already (and have been) engaging in leadership activities in their schools (see Nicole's post above!). We are excited to see all that fellows will do to support high-quality STEM teaching in their classrooms, districts, and beyond over the next several years.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 10:47 p.m.

    Hi Monica,

    Thanks for watching and for your thoughtful questions.  We will definitely explore your 3D graphing applet. Seems like it has great potential for high school mathematics classes integration of technology.

    We have also found the TPACK framework helpful to think about, especially as we try to support teachers not just in using technology to "replace" but to "transform" students' experiences.

    I think one of the biggest challenges for teachers has been figuring out how to integrate new technology in service to students' learning of specific content standards that are then assessed in specific ways. Understandably, teachers feel very responsible to "cover" standards that are assessed, when actually what students will benefit most from is using technology to explore and find answers to questions they have generated. 

    I also think (as my colleagues have previously noted) that it is difficult for teachers to know where to find and how to use technologies to enhance/transform their instruction.  Most of the teachers we work with are (successful) products of the system we are trying to change, so it is hard for them to imagine what they have not experienced.  We see that as one of our important roles - to expose our fellows to new and different technologies and consider connections to K-12 standards/understandings.

    I am going to view your video now!  Thank you!

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 11:55 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing such a powerful and detailed video. I was so excited to see that you included connections to the math classroom. I am wondering how the courses integrate the school district curriculum and standards expectations into the coursework. Once teachers engage in the courses and make changes/adaptations to some of their teacher practices, are you seeing change in student participation and engagement in their classes?

    Raffaella,

    You pose the question: What are key challenges that many hinder STEM teachers’ capacity to leverage this potential?

    Working closely with our K-12 teachers it is so often that they are overwhelmed with the day-to-day expectations of teaching and learning.  In the past when we have offered opportunities like this it has been difficult to get teachers interested in jumping on board because they already feel overwhelmed. Do you have any strategies on how to recruit teachers and support them through the program when we know they already have a huge amount of work on their plates?

  • Icon for: Nicole Charles

    Nicole Charles

    May 8, 2020 | 02:03 p.m.

    Hi Beth, I'm one of the fellows in this project so I can speak directly to my experiences with integration of school district curriculum & standards and our coursework.  I've found that so much of the work that I do in the program is DIRECTLY related to my curriculum.  For example, we redesigned two units so far - utilizing the Understanding by Design framework.  We were able to choose units that we are already teaching, so while redesigning the units was a lot of work, it was work that my students and I were able to benefit from directly.  That's the case with a lot of what we do.  In a different post, Michael referenced the "Problems of Practice," that were another assignment within the project.  This was important work where we identified something within our teaching practice that we wanted to improve (or further research) and then we engaged in a months-long research, implementation, analysis, and reflection cycle.  I found this work to be tremendously valuable and personally rewarding.

    Throughout each of the courses we've taken so far, I've always come away with fresh ideas that I can try with my own students, addressing my own curriculum and standards.  Part of this is due to the structure of the courses themselves and the learning activities we engage in and part of it is the result of being a member of this highly motivated and energetic community of educators.   We all push ourselves to do better, be better.

    You are right that the day-to-day expectations of teaching and learning can be overwhelming.  The many direct connections between our coursework and my teaching practice make the work we do in this program feel both relevant and rewarding.  We also have a very strong mentor-ship component in the program.  The mentor-mentee relationship has been very intentionally established and our mentors have been a tremendous support.

       
     
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    Dave Miller
  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 02:05 p.m.

    Thank you for your response Nicole!

  • May 7, 2020 | 12:06 p.m.

    In the third course integrating technology into STEM teaching, it looks like one of the key points is that data is at the heart of STEM. I'd love to hear more about your thoughts on this and to learn more about the technology that you introduce to support teachers in integrating data science into the work they are already doing.  

  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 7, 2020 | 07:42 p.m.

    Beth, you raise a really important questions here. In designing this project, we built on what worked (and did not work) in our previous two MTFs - and some key elements were (a) giving a clear taste to applicants of what this 5-year commitment would look like by having them participate in a mandated workshops as part of the recruiting, (b) creating a series of courses and other experiences that were directly meaningful for the Fellows, and (c) providing each Fellow with a mentor (see Cindy Callard's response earlier for more information on this point).

    We continue to be amazed at what our Fellows are willing and able to take on, though, so this is another issue I'd love some of our Fellows to speak to directly. 

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 11:39 a.m.

    Thanks for your response! I would love to hear from some of the fellows. 

  • Icon for: Fred Young

    Fred Young

    K-12 Teacher
    May 12, 2020 | 11:52 a.m.

    Hi Beth,

    Like Nicole, I am also one of the fellows in the project.  The work we do translates into the classroom on a daily basis.  I echo Nicole's statements, both the Understanding by Design (UbD) and the Problem of Practice (PoP) had immediate impact and because I designed and created them, they were exactly what I wanted them to be.  I could personally align them to the district standards, as well as to what I already teach, to enhance my classroom and teaching.

    As far as the teaching and learning piece, you raise a good point about teachers being overwhelmed.  I personally feel the key here is to allow each teachers to adopt at their own pace.  I once had a principal who used the phrase "Nobody likes change but a baby with a dirty diaper."  Forcing additional technologies and expectations on teachers without support will surely lead to a greater feeling of being overwhelmed.   When a teacher in district finds and uses new technology, and it's successful in terms of student engagement and learning, that tends to spread pretty quickly.  The idea is leverage that technology to make teaching and learning not only more effective, but more efficient as well.

     
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    Dave Miller
  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 02:05 p.m.

    Thank you for your response Fred!

  • Icon for: Michael Daley

    Michael Daley

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 01:57 p.m.

    Hi Traci,

    Thanks for asking more about the course. When we designed the data is at the heart of STEM module, we were inspired by the draft of the NY Computer Science & Digital Fluency Learning Standards. We recognized that the standards will need to be supported across the curriculum and we wanted our STEM teachers thinking more about them. We partnered with faculty from our Earth & Environmental Science Department to create an experience as learners. A tour of their labs and overview of research gave teachers a sense for how much data the researchers collect and also gave a glimpse into the time and effort spent developing instrumentation. We transitioned to having teachers deploy data loggers for studies of their classroom environments. We sent out Onset loggers to record temperature, light, and occupancy. We also sent out energy meters to measure appliance energy usage. Some Vernier equipment was also sent out with CO2 probes. The goal was for teachers to come back with a messy data set with multiple variables. Unfortunately, our equipment is still deployed and locked up in schools around the region! Our plan was to use CODAP from the Concord Consortium to visualize and make meaning of the messy data they were collecting. Due to COVID, we had to pivot and shifted the module to using simulations of epidemics and COVID-19.

    We also partnered with a researcher from computer science to provide teachers the opportunity to co-design a tool being developed to support understanding of machine learning and complex data. We were able to to this remotely as it is a web-based tool they are developing.

  • Icon for: June Teisan

    June Teisan

    Informal Educator
    May 9, 2020 | 05:14 p.m.

     Your three-course series is well designed. How do you see it playing out in our fully-virtual paradigm, and have you considered adding a fourth course to equip educators?

  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 9, 2020 | 05:25 p.m.

    Ideally, we designed our three courses preparing to leverage technology in STEM classrooms to be offered in a hybrid-online format.  We think this mode of delivery is ideal, because on the one hand we have from the very beginning tried to minimize face-to-face time in our program (as several of our Fellows need to drive an hour or more to come to campus), and on the other hand there are some powerful experiential learning activities we wanted to involve our Fellows in that are most suited for a face-to-face environment. 

    That said, a version of one of the three courses (the second course, EDE484A) has already been offered fully online this semester for another audience, and the third course has also been taught fully online for the second half of the semester, due to COVID-19 restrictions.  Some members of our team are continuing to experiment with ways to substitute face-to-face experiences with fully online ones, and we are confident that it would be possible to offer our sequence of 3 courses fully online and still provide a very powerful experience for Fellows.

    Personally, I would still find it valuable to have some component of the program to happen face-to-face, to fully take advantage of some unique learning affordances this modality offers. 

  • May 9, 2020 | 05:21 p.m.

    Great work, and it could not be more timely and helpful. I'll spread the news in Seattle. Our work (and video in this showcase) has been focused on the gender-related STEM stereotypes that are working against young girls as they encounter STEM. I know you can't solve everything in one program but what are your thoughts about digitally rich teaching and dampening down some of the stereotypes that exist in society today, to make the 'new normal' better for everyone. 

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 10, 2020 | 10:26 a.m.

    Hi Andrew, and thank you for your comment and question.  I just watched your video, and found it really interesting research and findings.  I also felt, as one of the other posts noted, that there is a strong connection to Deci and Ryan's motivation theory and relatedness/belongingness.  

    While we have not focused directly on the issue of gender-related STEM stereotypes in our project, issues of equity and understanding equitable teaching practices are at the heart of our work.  For students in rural settings, English Language Learners, students with special needs, students of color, etc., this work is critical.

    In addition to supporting our fellows' understandings of motivation theory and how it connects with learning, we have also grounded our fellows in important tenets of learning...one of them being that "Learning is social" and that "Knowledge is constructed in shared spaces."  This issue of belonging and that learning is social has been even more critical to consider as we teach and interact with students in fully online spaces.

    Thank you again for sharing!

  • May 10, 2020 | 03:59 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this exciting work! I understand you are early in the process but was wondering if you plan to follow your graduates to see the extent to which they incorporate learnings in their teaching after the program in general or in relation to a group that did not have this preparation model? Cheers.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 02:04 p.m.

    Hi Jennifer,

    Thank you for watching our video and for your question.  In addition to Raffaella's response below related to the evaluation component of our project, we have also recently partnered with Rice University and 5 other institutions to submit a Noyce Track 4 proposal last fall.  The purpose of the project is "to study the retention and persistence of Noyce Master Teaching Fellows (MTFs) in high-need schools beyond their teaching commitment in relation to their motivation (intrinsic value and self-efficacy for teaching), leadership skills, diversity dispositions, social networks, and school-work environment."  We will actually have a comparable group of non-Noyce teachers with similar background characteristics as a control group. This will not actually include the fellows in our current project due to the timing of the two projects, but we will be following up with our previous two cohorts of Noyce Fellows, as Raffaella noted in her post.  We are hopeful that we are approved, as we would love to more systematically research the continued work of the fellows in their communities and what seemed to be particularly impactful for them from the project. Fingers crossed for funding!

  • Icon for: Raffaella Borasi

    Raffaella Borasi

    Lead Presenter
    Professor and Director of the Center for Learning in the Digital Age
    May 10, 2020 | 04:27 p.m.

    Thanks for reaching out to our project, Jennifer.  I agree with you that we all could benefit from systematic data collection and analysis about what can support STEM teacher development.  Your work on synthesizing research on this topic in the ARISE project is indeed needed and very welcomed.

    Our current Noyce MTF project, as well as the two MTF projects that preceded it, and the three Noyce Scholarship projects the same team has been involved in, all have an evaluation component during the project - which extends a bit beyond the duration of the project for the Scholarship projects - which have all allowed to collect valuable data (although we do not have comparative data with non-Noyce STEM teachers).  Systematically following up with graduates from the program has been challenging - especially if they move out of town (which is more often the case with Noyce Scholars than Noyce MTFs).  However, we have maintained long-term relationships with several of our graduates, who become long-term collaborators and colleagues.    

     
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    Jennifer Carinci
  • May 12, 2020 | 03:22 p.m.

    Another great way to reach teachers of STEM who are reaching students.  A lot of great comments and answers on this thread.  Thank you everybody.

    So, am curious about the data this program produces, at the program level, teacher level, at the student level.  Also, as part of our project, we recognize the critical contribution of spatial skills to STEM.  Have you considered a metric to assess and track spatial skills in your teachers? Students?  There are a number of resources for evaluating spatial skills that you can check out here from SILC @ Northwestern University .

  • Small default profile

    Kristen Waldon

    K-12 Teacher
    May 12, 2020 | 04:02 p.m.

    Hello!  I am one of the fellows in this program and teach kindergarten.  Throughout our current remote learning situation I could not be more thankful that I am a part of this program.  Our beginning course made me really rethink and value how each student deserves an equal opportunity to learn and our more recent courses really opened my eyes to so many ways STEM can be integrated into the classroom.  I have been introduced to many new technologies and programs that I tried with my students, which has really helped them to be successful now that we are fully digital!

     
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    Dave Miller
  • May 12, 2020 | 07:51 p.m.

    Thank you for posting the Spatial Skills link!  I regret that I found time to check in on your discussion on this important area of research.  I follow the gender equity issue of the topic.  Hoping to connect in the future.

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

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