798 Views
  1. Lisa Flores
  2. Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Missouri
  1. Patton Garriott
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Denver
  1. Heather Hunt
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/heather-k-hunt/
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Missouri
  1. Hang-Shim Lee
  2. https://mvp-lab.wixsite.com/hslee
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Konkuk University
  1. RACHEL NAVARRO
  2. https://und.edu/directory/rachel.navarro
  3. Associate for Research and Faculty Development
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of North Dakota

Research on Broadening the Participation of Latinx in Engineering

NSF Awards: 1430614, 1430640

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Undergraduate

Engineering jobs are critical to the United States’ competitiveness in the global market and represent careers that are projected to grow. Latinx are sorely underrepresented across the engineering pipeline (National Science Foundation, 2013). This presentation highlights findings from an NSF supported project that examine the longitudinal effects of social cognitive, personality, and contextual factors on engineering students’ satisfaction and persistence in engineering as posited by Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994; 2000).

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 4, 2020 | 04:54 p.m.

    Thank you for viewing our video! This video highlights some findings from two NSF projects that we've led focusing on the persistence of Latinx undergraduate students in engineering. To learn more about our work, please visit our project website at nsfengineerstudy.org.

    We welcome any comments that you have about the video or the work we are doing. After viewing the videos, did any findings surprise you? We would be interested in hearing your perspective of the environmental factors that might play a role in the differences in engineering self-efficacy beliefs and perceived supports between Latinx engineering students attending predominantly White institutions and Hispanic serving institutions.

  • Icon for: Tiffany Perry

    Tiffany Perry

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 08:52 a.m.

    This was an excellent video. It’s interesting to see both the ways that supports over time can greatly affect Latino participation in engineering. It reminds me of a similar problem happening in the African American population. This is great work you are doing! In addition, I was amazed to see how much the Latino population is growing. It is vital that our nation grows to include underrepresented groups in order for all of us to prosper culturally and economically!

  • Icon for: Rachel Navarro

    Rachel Navarro

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 08:39 p.m.

    Thanks for watching our video! Issues of diversity, inclusion, and equity definitely need to be addressed within STEM fields. We have really focused on students' perception of supports and resources offered by the institution, faculty and peers. I would love to know what other environmental factors that you think play a role in persons' from underrepresented groups persistence in engineering. 

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 10:44 a.m.

    Tiffany--you are right.  There is more work that needs to be done to ensure that students from underrepresented groups in engineering--African Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, and women--receive consistent support throughout their undergraduate training to increase the chances of retaining them in the field. This support needs to extend beyond the first year of college. Thank you for commenting on our work!

     

  • Small default profile

    Judy Healy-Mendez

    Parent
    May 5, 2020 | 10:47 a.m.

    Great work! This video was excellent and underscores the important contribution the Latinx community can make in engineering and the sciences. By studying underrepresented groups we can impact the future of our country by understanding the barriers to access in engineering for Latinx students and how we can work to eliminate those barriers. Thanks to you and Dr. Navarro for the amazing work you are doing!

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Rachel Navarro
  • Icon for: Patti Curtis

    Patti Curtis

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 12:46 p.m.

    Thanks for your work in this area!  Can you identify some of the more successful supports that led to greater persistence for Latinas in engineering?  How did they differ from HSI to PSI?  Were there any correlations to parental educational pathways?  If engineers beget engineers, we will continue to get more white and Asian male engineers?  How can we break this self-fulfilling cycle?  What can Latinx families do to support and encourage their children to pursue engineering? And how can faculty and industry continue those supports?

  • Icon for: Patton Garriott

    Patton Garriott

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:17 p.m.

    Patti, thank you for your feedback and excellent questions! Our qualitative work has shown that student organizations, affinity groups, and faculty role models play a prominent role in supporting Latinx men and women persist through their degree and thrive in engineering. This was true at PWI and HSI's, however availability of these structural supports appeared to be stronger at HSI's. Notably, most Latinx students' families were highlighted as strong emotional supports, even if they did not have a background in engineering. Listening to students' struggles and encouragement were often highlighted as supportive actions from students' families.

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Laura Cisneros
    Rachel Navarro
  • Icon for: Marjorie Bequette

    Marjorie Bequette

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 05:24 p.m.

    Thanks for your video and your work!

    In your project, how much effort are you giving to support for the students, and how much effort are you putting into changing the institution that is around them (faculty training, structural supports, etc)? Does one feel more important than the other?

  • Icon for: Rachel Navarro

    Rachel Navarro

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 08:45 p.m.

    Thanks for watching our video! Our research project is funded by NSF EHR Core with a focus on fundamental or basic research. We have put effort into investigating the role of supports from institutions, faculty, and peers in Latinxs' persistence in engineering majors and careers within the framework of Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent et al., 1994; 2000). Our hope is to build a strong foundation of fundamental knowledge that we then can use to build intervention programs. In doing this work, we have found that we need to take a deeper dive into what environmental factors impact Latinxs' persistence so we can determine what factors are protective or enhancing and what factors are not. Such information can lead to the development of more environmental interventions rather than just individual interventions. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marjorie Bequette
  • Small default profile

    George Gushue

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 05:30 p.m.

    Really fascinating, sustained work.  I was wondering about the diminishing coping efficacy & supports and increasing barriers reported by students at the HSIs over time.  Did participants suggest any reasons for this?  Were more supports provided earlier and withdrawn? Was looking ahead to a difficult career climate after graduation a factor?  Thanks.  Really enjoyed this. 

  • Icon for: Rachel Navarro

    Rachel Navarro

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:01 p.m.

    Thanks for stopping by and watching our video, George! Our findings related to decreases in perceived supports and coping efficacy as well as increases in perceived barriers over time were quantitative in nature. We plan to further investigate these findings in future qualitative interviews. Our current thinking is that Latinx students at HSIs may become more aware of the potential environmental barriers associated with pursuing a degree or career in engineering resulting in more negative cognitions. These same students may not be exposed to coping strategies or afforded necessary supports and resources putting them at risk for attrition.

     

  • Small default profile

    George Gushue

    Researcher
    May 6, 2020 | 12:09 a.m.

    Thanks Rachel-- that makes think of the recent work regarding negative outcome expectations,  Such an important addition to how we think about this.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Rachel Navarro
  • Small default profile

    Lisa Dorner

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 06:38 p.m.

    This video is so helpful to understand your research - gracias! I'm curious what you're finding in terms of what kind of support at Time 1 might counteract the increase in perceived barriers and decrease in perceived supports. It seems like the contexts get increasingly difficult and we have to provide training and supports for Engineering schools/departments to enhance their climate and support offered. Also, did you study/find any gender differences? I look forward to hearing more about this project!

  • May 6, 2020 | 10:59 a.m.

    Great project, and great video! I was wondering if you also included some questions regarding their K-12 experience in STEM? How that might play a role in their perception and self-efficacy? This might be beyond your study.

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 03:00 p.m.

    Thanks, Meltem!  We gathered information about pre-college STEM programs that are designed to prepare high school students for college. One of our GRAs on the project is currently analyzing this data for his dissertation to see if involvement in these programs is related to social cognitions, supports, and barriers while in college. Are there other types of K-12 experiences that you would be interested in us learning about in future studies? 

  • Icon for: Jameela Jafri

    Jameela Jafri

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 04:30 p.m.

    Such an interesting video! Can you share little about how family is engaged as a support for Latinx students in PWIs? What are some best practices or lessons learned around family engagement that you can share from your work? Thank you!

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 11, 2020 | 12:08 p.m.

    Thanks for watching our video, Jameela. Qualitative findings from our study indicated that participants described their family as emotionally supportive of their pursuit of an engineering degree. They described family support as the ability to talk with their family about school (family listened, allowed them to vent about school when needed) or to receive words of encouragement from their family that made a difference. 

    Among Latinx students, many are first generation college students, so these students may not be able to count on their family members for educational capitals (what to expect from college). Our recommendations for college administrators, faculty, and staff (i.e., advisors) are to orient Latinx parents and families to the academic demands of engineering students so that they can get an understanding of how to best support their children in their pursuit of an engineering degree. 

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 8, 2020 | 04:26 p.m.

    Great Video! Really fascinating work.  I was particularly struck by your findings about the differing needs of Latinx students at PWIs  vs. HSIs.  I think I understand what support might look like. I was wondering about self-efficacy.  Are there any strategies for bolstering self-efficacy?  Also at PWIs my guess is that a strong majority of the faculty is White. Do you have any thoughts about how White faculty might better support self-efficacy in Latinx students (other than hoping that faculty of color will take care of it)?

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 8, 2020 | 04:26 p.m.

    Great Video! Really fascinating work.  I was particularly struck by your findings about the differing needs of Latinx students at PWIs  vs. HSIs.  I think I understand what support might look like. I was wondering about self-efficacy.  Are there any strategies for bolstering self-efficacy?  Also at PWIs my guess is that a strong majority of the faculty is White. Do you have any thoughts about how White faculty might better support self-efficacy in Latinx students (other than hoping that faculty of color will take care of it)?

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 8, 2020 | 04:26 p.m.

    Great Video! Really fascinating work.  I was particularly struck by your findings about the differing needs of Latinx students at PWIs  vs. HSIs.  I think I understand what support might look like. I was wondering about self-efficacy.  Are there any strategies for bolstering self-efficacy?  Also at PWIs my guess is that a strong majority of the faculty is White. Do you have any thoughts about how White faculty might better support self-efficacy in Latinx students (other than hoping that faculty of color will take care of it)?

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 8, 2020 | 04:26 p.m.

    Great Video! Really fascinating work.  I was particularly struck by your findings about the differing needs of Latinx students at PWIs  vs. HSIs.  I think I understand what support might look like. I was wondering about self-efficacy.  Are there any strategies for bolstering self-efficacy?  Also at PWIs my guess is that a strong majority of the faculty is White. Do you have any thoughts about how White faculty might better support self-efficacy in Latinx students (other than hoping that faculty of color will take care of it)?

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 11, 2020 | 12:21 p.m.

    Thanks for watching the video and for your question, Bud. Yes--there are suggestions for increasing students' self-efficacy beliefs that are based on both theory (Bandura's self-efficacy theory) and empirical research. Bandura's theory suggests that self-efficacy can be developed by (1) providing students with opportunities to experience success in engineering tasks (so teachers should consider breaking down difficult skills into smaller, manageable tasks); (2) providing opportunities for students to see others successfully perform the skills (teachers can demonstrate the skills, or even better, teachers can find people in the field or more advanced peers from similar backgrounds to perform the tasks that students need to learn); (3) provide encouraging verbal feedback for students to continue in the tasks; and (4) help students to manage negative emotional feelings that they may encounter when tackling engineering tasks (i.e., managing anxiety).

    PWIs do traditionally have fewer faculty of color than Hispanic Serving Institutions. If faculty/administrators at PWIs want to help Latinx students, they need to assume leadership roles in this and not expect that faculty of color will handle this (as it will lead to burnout and difficulty in retaining faculty of color if they shoulder this responsibility). White faculty at PWIs need to take an active role in reaching out to Latinx students to work in their labs, in providing encouraging feedback to Latinx students for their performance on class assignments, to inviting guests in the profession who are people of color so that Latinx students have models for how they are represented in the field. More importantly, White faculty at PWIs need to do a careful analysis of structural changes within their classrooms, departments, college, and institution that are favorable to majority White students and may inadvertently send messages to Latinx students that they don't belong in engineering (or college). Changes are needed both in how they interact with students and at the larger institutional level to improve the academic and work climates for Latinx students and people of color in the field.    

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2020 | 02:48 p.m.

    Thanks so much Dr. Flores!

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2020 | 02:48 p.m.

    Thanks so much Dr. Flores!

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2020 | 02:48 p.m.

    Thanks so much Dr. Flores!

  • Small default profile

    Bud Ninety

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2020 | 02:48 p.m.

    Thanks so much Dr. Flores!

  • Icon for: Ashley Garcia

    Ashley Garcia

    Account Manager
    May 11, 2020 | 03:58 p.m.

    Hi,

    What a great video! I'm glad the research demonstrates the importance of supporting engineering students at each stage in their college career. I was wondering how you demonstrate your findings to the faculty and administration at the colleges you researched. Our Bystander Leadership Program is a one-day workshop for faculty to educate them on issues like implicit bias, and we've found that one of the most effective aspects of the program is that we present our findings in theater format.

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2020 | 02:10 p.m.

    Thanks for your comment, Ashley!  Theater format--do you use interactive theater?  This sounds like a very creative way to inform faculty about your research findings. We have used traditional methods for disseminating information--via in person presentations, webinars, and reports. We have also shared this video with them. 

  • Icon for: Kerrie Wilkins-Yel

    Kerrie Wilkins-Yel

    Researcher
    May 12, 2020 | 04:51 p.m.

    This is an excellent video! Thank you for your work in increasing our nuanced understanding of Latinx students at both PWIs and HSIs. As we work to broaden participation in STEM, these findings will certainly be useful in informing interventions and policy efforts. I'm curious as to whether there were any intersectional examinations of gender differences as it relates to Latinx women. Thank you!

  • Icon for: Patton Garriott

    Patton Garriott

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 05:16 p.m.

    Thanks, Kerrie! We have a couple of forthcoming papers using our qualitative data that speak a bit more to these intersectional dimensions. In short, gendered racism seems to play a significant role for Latinx women at HSI and PWI's. However, the multiple (race x gender) marginalization that tends to occur at PWI's appears to hinder the kinds of coping and resistance efforts you have documented in your work.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kerrie Wilkins-Yel
  • Icon for: Kerrie Wilkins-Yel

    Kerrie Wilkins-Yel

    Researcher
    May 12, 2020 | 05:27 p.m.

    Thanks, Pat! It's interesting to hear that gendered racism played out at both HSIs and PWIs. I look forward to reading (and citing) those papers when they are out. Thanks!

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2020 | 05:04 p.m.

    Thank you, Kerrie!  We did not find differences in the associations that we were examining across Latina women and Latino men. The main differences that emerged in our analyses to date are between Latinx students across PWIs and HSIs, as well as racial differences between Latinx and White students attending PWIs. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kerrie Wilkins-Yel
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