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  1. Ashley Gannon
  2. https://people.sc.fsu.edu/~ag12s/
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Florida State University
  1. Matthew Mauntel
  2. Graduate Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Florida State University
  1. Jessica Smith
  2. Graduate Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Florida State University

Computer Science Integrated with Mathematics in Middle Schools (CSIMMS)

NSF Awards: 1640039

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 6-8

Computer Science Integrated with Mathematics in Middle School (CSIMMS) is a collaborative project between middle school Mathematics teachers, FSU Computer Science faculty, and STEM education faculty to design, develop, and implement modules in middle school mathematics courses that integrate computer science. Our broader project identifies design principles for the development of such integrative modules and documents what is needed for schools and teachers to successfully implement them. This informs what it takes to broaden participation in computer science via integration with mathematics. Our video features examples of programs written by students in the context of the project’s curricular materials. We discuss mathematics and computer science ideas featured in these examples.

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: James Brown

    James Brown

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 08:54 a.m.

    I like the idea of integrating computer science with mathematics.  How do you plan on disseminating this information to a broader network of teachers?  

  • Icon for: Matthew Mauntel

    Matthew Mauntel

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:03 a.m.

    Hi James! We are finishing refining the modules now with the data we have from several iterations. We hope to post them on our website (https://csimms.cs.fsu.edu/) at some point over the summer.

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    James Brown
  • Icon for: Dave Miller

    Dave Miller

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 5, 2020 | 09:17 a.m.

    Exciting project!  Great to see how this is being integrated with K-12 MS Math. Also caught the use of Scratch for the story telling, in the video - very cool. Wondering if part of your work might be at the intersection of ELA classrooms, Math classrooms, and work with in the ELL realm? Thanks for sharing your work here, in the NSF SFA.

  • Icon for: Matthew Mauntel

    Matthew Mauntel

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:29 a.m.

    Great Question! Currently, we are not looking at that intersection, but it is a great suggestion for future research.

  • Icon for: Jessica Smith

    Jessica Smith

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 09:31 a.m.

    Yes, that is a really nice question. Currently, our focus has been on developing and refining 12 modules, but your idea would be interesting for the future!

  • Icon for: Chih-Pu Dai

    Chih-Pu Dai

    Graduate Student
    May 5, 2020 | 01:36 p.m.

    This is such a cool project! I liked how you share the idea of "computer science and mathematics can enhance each other." I am curious about the technologies used in the modules, mainly Scratch? In addition, what are the materials in the modules (e.g., are there facilitators'/ teachers' guide)? The students' example in the video looks fantastic! 

  • Icon for: Jessica Smith

    Jessica Smith

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:56 p.m.

    Hi Chih-Pu and thanks for the questions! The only technology used in the modules regarding coding is Scratch. We starting to include some videos in the modules that could be used as tutorials, though. We have made student tasks and teacher guides for each module, but are currently working on more detailed teacher guides that aren't too long but have enough in them to assist in implementing any of the modules. We're hoping we might be able to make a workbook of sorts!

     
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    Chih-Pu Dai
  • Icon for: DeLene Hoffner

    DeLene Hoffner

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 03:12 a.m.

    What a wonderful project!  I wondered what you found to be your greatest challenge?

  • Icon for: Matthew Mauntel

    Matthew Mauntel

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 08:42 a.m.

    Thank you DeLene for the question.  One of the greatest challenges we found while trying to get teachers to implement the modules was convincing teachers that the modules could be used instead of their standard lessons on the subject as opposed to just supplemental material.  It greatly helped that we had one teacher who was willing to take a risk and use the modules to introduce material early in the project and she had some great success.  She helped convince other teachers in the project to take a chance on the modules as replacements for standard lessons. 

    One key aspect that the teachers helped quite a bit with was refining the coding exercises so that the students could see required mathematics in the code.  To give you an example, we have a unit on geometric transformations and there are many different ways a reflection can be programmed in Scratch.  Finding an exercise that not only had the students reflect an object, but also having that exercise produce coding variants that were relevant to the standards relating reflections and coordinates was a bit of a challenge.  This is where the implementing teachers were great and provided great feedback that helped with the designing and refining of the modules.  A big thank you goes out to all of them.

     
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    DeLene Hoffner
  • Icon for: Stacey Forsyth

    Stacey Forsyth

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 11:59 a.m.

    It's great to see Scratch being integrated into mathematics classrooms. Can you share more about what this looks like in a teacher's classroom? Are the different modules integrated into the class at different points throughout the year, to complement the curriculum, or is this integrated as its own Scratch unit? Also, can you share more about how you're evaluating the impacts of the program? Are you measuring gains in students' understanding of math or coding concepts, or are you focusing more on the teachers?

  • Icon for: Matthew Mauntel

    Matthew Mauntel

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 02:19 p.m.

    Stacy, thank you for your interest!  Implementation in the teachers' classrooms varied greatly.  Some classrooms utilized smartboards to display student code with accompanying discussions.  Others gave the students the modules and let them work largely independently and there was everything in between.  The classrooms varied greatly as well with several of the implementation classrooms being in low SES schools.   

    The modules were implemented at different points in the year and were designed to replace the lessons when they appeared in the curriculum.  We did have some teachers who used the modules in a more supplemental way as either an introduction to the material or revisiting the material after it had been covered in class.  

    In terms of evaluating the learning gains from the program, we collected a pre-assessment math question and a post-module assessment with questions about math, computational thinking, and programming.  We also gave students a pre/post MISO survey to evaluate the program's impact on student attitudes towards STEM.  In addition, we also looking at the impact on the instructors and have pre and post-implementation interviews, recordings of their classroom implementation, as well as pre/post-implementation MISOs. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    DeLene Hoffner
  • Icon for: DeLene Hoffner

    DeLene Hoffner

    Facilitator
    May 9, 2020 | 11:34 p.m.

    When you gave students a pre/post MISO survey to evaluate the program's impact on student attitudes towards STEM, what were the top findings? 

  • Icon for: Jessica Smith

    Jessica Smith

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 11:49 a.m.

    Hi Delene! We're actually in the process of analyzing the MISO data currently. We're hoping to be able to answer questions like yours by the end of the summer! We have a lot of data that we're trying to sift through in the coming months.

  • May 7, 2020 | 09:04 a.m.

    Really glad to see serious work being done at the intersection of CS and mathematics, especially for middle school students. I'll definitely check out the curriculum materials.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    DeLene Hoffner
  • Icon for: Jessica Smith

    Jessica Smith

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 09:45 a.m.

    Hi, Michael! We're not exactly sure how we're going to disseminate the modules, but you can definitely keep up with things on our website (https://csimms.cs.fsu.edu/).

  • Icon for: DeLene Hoffner

    DeLene Hoffner

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 06:43 p.m.

    So often, subjects are taught in isolation.  The foundation of your program is so inspiring and relevant.  I'm impressed that Computer Science is integrated with Mathematics and STEM.  The team working together is a powerful way to design, develop, and implement modules.  How did the planning for this come together with so many different departments/ teachers? 

  • Icon for: Ashley Gannon

    Ashley Gannon

    Lead Presenter
    Graduate Student
    May 12, 2020 | 11:53 a.m.

    Dr. Ellen Granger has done quite a bit of interdisciplinary work. When she saw the RFP for the STEM+C grants, she put the interdisciplinary team together. She selected folks who have a personality to work well together. When schools were selected, they were chosen to represent the community demographics and also under-resourced schools. Math teachers at these schools were invited to participate, and the ones who were interested came on board.

  • Icon for: DeLene Hoffner

    DeLene Hoffner

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 11:58 p.m.

    I wondered what "ah-ha's" or discoveries were most profound in your project.  

  • Icon for: Matthew Mauntel

    Matthew Mauntel

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2020 | 11:55 a.m.

    DeLene, great question.  I think one of the most ah-ha moments for me was the amount of time students spent personalizing their sprites and telling stories with their project.  Also, there were some students who did not seem to enjoy programming in Scratch and it would be interesting to investigate why this is.  Finally, creating and refining 12 modules in 3 years is a lot of work.

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