2545 Views
  1. Margaret Baguio
  2. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/info/baguio.html
  3. Program Manager - Education and Outreach
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. University of Texas at Austin
  1. Tim Urban
  2. Director
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Texas at Austin

STEM Enhancement in Earth Science (SEES)

NNX16AB89A

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 9-12

Scientists and Engineers at NASA and The University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Space Research are conducting NASA supported research on astronomy, remote sensing, and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. This summer NASA, Texas Space Grant Consortium and UT Austin will support a summer intern program where 10th and 11th grade students will work with NASA subject matter experts to provide authentic research experiences.  Students will have the opportunity to design a Mars habitat, analyze ice sheets, and track asteroids.  The internship is a combination of remote work to provide NASA background data in addition to the two-week residential program on the university campus.  This research experience promotes career exploration in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. 

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 4, 2020 | 02:30 p.m.

    Hello!  I am Margaret Baguio, Principal Investigator for NASA's STEM Enhancement in Earth Science (SEES) high school intern program and Program Manager for Education and Outreach for the Texas Space Grant Consortium at The University of Texas Center for Space Research in Austin, Texas. I have worked for over forty years in youth development and education. During that time, I have worked in the public schools, for the Texas Cooperative Extension Service 4-H & Youth Development Program, managed a USDA Science and Literacy project for at-risk youth, and promoted space education to students, teachers and the general public through the Texas Space Grant Consortium with curriculum, professional development, science nights, and career exploration.

    I had the good fortune of being recognized for our outstanding leadership and contributions to education in the past, receiving the national Alan B. Shepard Technology in Education Award in 2016, selected as a NASA Solar System Ambassador, and as a teacher liaison for the Space Foundation.  Each of these experiences has provided new opportunities, curriculum, and resources that I can share with teachers and students.

    The SEES high school intern program provides outstanding 10th and 11th grade students from across the nation the opportunity to participate in an immersive experience where they are mentored by a NASA subject matter expert, conducting authentic research.  Students prepare for the on-site internship by completing 60-90 hours of remote work to prepare them for the on-site experience at The University of Texas at Austin for two weeks in the summer.  The students experience life on a college campus, hear directly from NASA subject matter experts, participate in experiential learning activities, and conduct research.  Projects vary based on the needs from project scientists and engineers.  The internship climax is a poster presentation and live-streamed presentation about their research.

    Our ultimate goal is to increase interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math for students from diverse backgrounds in the hopes more will seek degrees in STEM in college which will lead to future careers in that field.  Since participating in the SEES internship, all students have majored in STEM, interned while in college at NASA and many aerospace industries, worked in summers at technology companies, and continued their path toward futures in STEM fields.

    I am interested in learning about other projects that provide high school students the opportunity to conduct authentic research.  What methods do you use for recruiting and engaging subject matter experts?  How do you select high school interns for research projects?  What evaluation mechanisms do you have in place to provide data on the engagement and value of conducting authentic research in high school students?

    Thank you for watching the video, produced by a former SEES intern currently majoring in Aerospace Engineering!

     
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    Tim Urban
    Sheikh Ahmad Shah
    Steven Greenstein
    Leigh Peake
  • Icon for: Jack Broering

    Jack Broering

    Program Coordinator
    May 5, 2020 | 07:09 a.m.

    Enjoyed watching your video as it addresses an important aspect of education and that is hands-on experience. Kids always ask why am I studying this or how will I ever use this. The University of Cincinnati has a similar program for teachers where the teachers work on a research project during the summer and develop a lesson for their students they could bring into the classroom. This made the teachers more aware of technology and how it might be applied with their students. So the question might be "How can you engage the teachers who can then engage their students with these hands-on experiences." Great job thanks for your efforts.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 10:32 a.m.

    Thanks for the great question.  While this video focused on the student participants we do engage educators in the SEES project in various ways.  We have educators who assist subject matter experts with each team, develop lessons that they can take back to their students for hands-on learning.  In addition we have had a Teacher Externship program where educators observed each project, taking notes about the career opportunities that were discussed, and then developed a NASA career exploration product that was used in their schools to open students' eyes to Careers at NASA.  The third opportunity provided educators the opportunity to participate in a multi-day workshop titled "Little Blue Dot" where we took the earth and space education standards in the state where students scored low, took curriculum and activities from SMEs and our NASA SciAct partners and selected activities that matched each of those standards.  All of these opportunities for educators, partnered with the authentic research experience with students, has made SEES a success.

     
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    Lin Chambers
    Jack Broering
  • Icon for: Lin Chambers

    Lin Chambers

    May 5, 2020 | 04:35 p.m.

    Are the results of the Little Blue Dot workshop available?

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 05:32 p.m.

    I do have an evaluation brief for the Little Blue Dot workshop.  It was designed for middle school earth science teachers.  Once our university reopens then we will be able to access.  

  • Icon for: Leigh Peake

    Leigh Peake

    Informal Educator
    May 5, 2020 | 11:36 a.m.

    This was a great window into the SEES experience and the array of students you all engage in the program. I love hearing the testimonials! The discussion above about your work with teachers is also helpful. I agree that for those of us working outside of schools it's essential to support the educators spending time with students every day. While we often can provide the invaluable spark, they are the ones who have to fan the flame. Thanks for the video and the great work!

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 12:38 p.m.

    Thank you Leigh!  The students are truly amazing and it is a joy to see and hear from former interns about how the SEES experience has been of benefit as they select college majors, internships, and careers.  Many suffer through the on-line computer coding class but then share how valuable it was when they got to college.  

  • Icon for: Jason Aloisio

    Jason Aloisio

    Manger of Project TRUE
    May 5, 2020 | 12:29 p.m.

    I really enjoyed this video and seeing some of the students' impressions first-hand. How are you adapting to COVID-19? Will you run the program remotely this summer? 

  • Icon for: Steven Greenstein

    Steven Greenstein

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 12:35 p.m.

    What an impact this project has had on so many students! And what a rare and unique opportunity you provide for them.

    What thoughts have you had about engaging 10th and 11th grade students who have yet to be identified as "outstanding"? What are your criteria for participation? It's too rare that students get to engage in authentic problems within school buildings, and you've demonstrated their formative power through your project. Have students who find conventional schooling rather unengaging found themselves to be outstanding through participation in your project? That would be a remarkable achievement.

    Thanks again for your work. These testimonials speak to the differences you're making in people's live.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 01:08 p.m.

    We realized after year 1 that we needed to change the criteria in the application.  We want a more diverse group of students to pursue STEM degrees and college.  If the school they attend does not offer AP classes, dual credit, STEM opportunities, etc. then how will these students even know what STEM opportunities are available?  We added these questions to the application to better serve students as a whole.  We do not ask for transcripts.  We ask students to write essays about why they want to be selected, what STEM experiences they have had in the past, what their current plans for the future look like, and courses they have taken and liked.  The students also produce a video of introduction and letter of recommendation.  All of these combined provide a pool of great students from various backgrounds. I like the question about students that find conventional schooling un-engaging but for our program most students that apply have a unique interest in STEM but have expressed the value of being with students that have like-minded interests.  One important value that we will miss this summer is the experience of living on a university campus and the face to face connection with students and mentors.

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Holly Morin
    Steven Greenstein
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 09:53 p.m.

    Mr. Greenstein:  I also failed to mention that we have had student participants from all walks of life...children of migrant farmers, homeless, attends school on the Boeing campus campus, etc.  What recommendations do you have regarding working with diverse audiences.

     

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 12:35 p.m.

    Thank you for watching the video.  These students are truly amazing.  It is interesting that what we thought would be a negative has turned into a positive for the summer programs this year.  We are moving all projects to a virtual platform.  Students will continue to do 30-60 hours of remote work prior to  beginning their research.  Due to COVID19 we are adding virtual projects for students to identify NASA sensors, missions, and data that will assist in the research about the pandemic and brainstorm ideas on how to mitigate some of the issues we are seeing as a result.  It will be interesting to see how the students respond.

     
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    Lin Chambers
  • Icon for: Kristen Procko

    Kristen Procko

    Researcher
    May 6, 2020 | 08:21 p.m.

    Awesome! What does your mentoring plan look like for the move to digital? I'm curious about how many students and mentors you have in the program? Are you planning for small group research presentations, one-on-one sessions, a blend? Really anything you're willing to share about your move to virtual—I would love to hear about your insights and plan. Thanks for sharing your project!

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 6, 2020 | 10:41 p.m.

    Thanks for the great questions Kristen.  In the past each intern completed 60-90 hours of remote work prior to coming to the university.  We will continue with the on-line earth science background tutorial and Python coding course for the 60 selected for traditional projects.  In addition to those, previously, students completed 30 hours of remote work based on the project they would be doing at the university to prepare them for the two week on-site internship.  This year the NASA subject matter experts will work with them through that 30 hours of work.  All projects are designed for teams of 5-9.  July 20-31 the students will work with the project mentors daily for 1-2 hours, gather data and information, and then work in small groups to accomplish tasks.  

    We will host bi-weekly presentations to the entire group 1-2 times weekly.  We have astronauts, engineers, and researchers sharing their experiences.  

    We have over 100 students that will be conducting research on Zika and West Nile virus in a project titled Mosquito Mapper.  These students listen to presentations (they are also taped for anyone who cannot attend live), communicate through a software called Basecamp, conduct field investigations to identify larvae and share their results.  There is a science symposium at the end.  

    Due to COVID19 we added four projects this year for almost 300 students to investigate themes of research and possible solutions.  They then identify NASA sensors, missions, and data that would assist in their research.

    We will lose the value of students experiencing living in the dorm, bonding with like-minded students face-to-face, visiting a NASA center, and hands-on experiments.  

    All project teams present their research in a live-stream at the end of July.  Moving to virtual is a challenge but I think these students excited to work with NASA and conduct research.

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Kristen Procko

    Kristen Procko

    Researcher
    May 7, 2020 | 11:45 a.m.

    Thanks for the detailed response! I'm really impressed with your plan, and glad to see you pushing the program forward—students need connection now more than ever. Maybe it would be possible to do a virtual tour of a NASA center with an opportunity for Q&A?

    I've taught Master's students online for many years, and we never used to do social events, but did do synchronous office hours. When office hours resumed after spring break, some students mentioned how centering and normal it was to have office hours, and for some it was the most adult contact they'd had in weeks. So I started organizing some online "coffee shops" where students could pop in and could talk informally about the course with their classmates and I, or have a coffee and just talk about life (which more often happened). It might be neat to explore setting up an exclusively social space to try to promote some of the bonding aspect that they would miss. Thanks again, great work! 

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 7, 2020 | 12:30 p.m.

    Thanks for the great suggestions Kristen.  We tried to do a virtual tour of a NASA center with another project on which I am working but only essential employees are allowed onsite.  We are getting support from other SMEs to share their research and even their history.  We had Apollo 13 astronaut, Fred Haise, speak to students about his experience and how to problem solve and stay positive during critical times.

    I like the "coffee shop" idea.  Thank you!

  • Icon for: Ed Robeck

    Ed Robeck

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 06:26 p.m.

    Great thread of questions and responses, Margaret. I was fascinated at the openness of the selection process. How much do the students know about the projects they'll be working on as they apply? Are there options once they're selected? Do the mentors have a role in the students' assignments? Hearing all the student voices was a real treat!

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 5, 2020 | 09:50 p.m.

    The projects are all listed on our website, along with a description.  While each gives a general idea of the project, there is more explanation as they are selected.  The student chooses their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice for projects.  We try to give them their first choice but that isn't always possible.  We had over 600 applications for the 60 on-site internship positions this summer.  Their are two educators that review each application to narrow it to the top 100.  These are then reviewed and ranked by the science team.  We then divide according to project choices.  This summer is different as we are virtual.  The project mentors guide all research and final selections.  The 60 will participate in the traditional projects and we have added projects that are related to the COVID19 response and the Mosquito Mapper project.  For COVID19 response, students will work in groups based around a topic, brainstorm ideas for solving the problem, and then identify NASA sensors, satellite data, and missions that may provide data to assist in their recommendations.  We added the Mosquito Mapper project as a virtual option last year with 125 participants.  These students learned how to identify Zika and West Nile mosquito larvae and populated the database on where it was located and the conditions in which it was found.  

    Have you had experience with mentors guiding student research in the past?

  • Icon for: Ed Robeck

    Ed Robeck

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 08:23 a.m.

    Hi Margaret, I have some experience with mentor-guided student research, but not at the scale at which you are operating. It is impressive that you are able to place so many students with mentors. It must clearly be a win-win. How do you engage mentors? How do you support them? Do you have a structure that guides the mentor in terms of expectations? That has been a challenge for me in some instances--kind of in the way back machine--there was a lot of variability in what mentors thought made a quality internship.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 6, 2020 | 10:42 a.m.

    Our mentors are a mixture of NASA subject matter experts and college professors with NASA-funded research.  Depending on their funding levels we do provide some financial support.  We recruit them through our past relationships and recommendations from our NASA partners.  We provide a mentor packet that explains expectations, deadlines, and schedule.  We have a schedule that has worked for us.  We meet with mentors to select projects in the fall, advertise and open applications for students in November, deadline for applications is March, judging of student applications in March/April while mentors are developing additional details on their specific projects, selection of students in April, and then May the entire team meets every couple of weeks to stay on track.  This year is unusual due to us moving all projects to virtual.  That has been a challenge.  

  • Icon for: David Campbelll

    David Campbelll

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 12:22 p.m.

    It’s good to see you have taken steps to promote diversity among your student participants.  Nevertheless, your selection criteria ( essays, prior course work, video, etc.) still indicates your participants are already highly motivated to pursue  a STEM career.  Do you follow your students after high school to evaluate the impact of SEES

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 6, 2020 | 12:43 p.m.

    Students contact us for letters of recommendation as they apply for college, internships, and fellowships.  In addition, students are happy to share their accomplishments and successes.  Statistics show that over 90% have gone on to major in STEM in college.  Our first group is graduating from college this year.  It does warm my heart to hear of their success.

  • May 6, 2020 | 03:17 p.m.

    Thanks for bringing this is a great opportunity for students.  Students in the video mentioned research... What kind of research are they doing?  And, to the project, what are the research objectives of this project? Outcomes? etc. 

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 6, 2020 | 03:49 p.m.

    Although this might be lengthy, the following is a list of projects.  Because we are moving to virtual projects this summer we are adding four additional projects dealing with COVID19 and how NASA missions, sensors, and data may help with this research.  Outcomes are based on scientists field of study.  Each team presents a poster and final oral presentation which is live-streamed about their research and results.

     

    DISASTER RESEARCH WITH MAGIC (MID-AMERICAN GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION CENTER)

    DISASTER MAP: USING SATELLITES FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
    Interns will focus on a recent flood, wildfire, or tropical storm event, review satellite image datasets from NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the US Geological Survey (USGS) collected before, during and after the event, and test best practices for rapid information extraction from these data. We will use image analysis and investigate related geospatial information resources with the goal of creating and distributing products for emergency response applications and societal benefit.

    FLOOD RESPONSE
    Interns will compare National Weather Service Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) products derived from Radar with rainfall gauge values collected in the same time and space. This will provide ground truth evidence of estimations compared to captured rain totals. Interns will also develop Python scripts to automate the transformation of QPE point data into an interpolated gridded surface that can be tiled for rapid consumption by web-based mapping applications via rest endpoints. Activities will simulate recent flood events with the goal of improving future flood response scenarios.

    CLIMATE RESEARCH WITH CSR (CENTER FOR SPACE RESEARCH)

    WEIGHING WHERE THE WATER GOES
    Interns will analyze data from GRACE (Gravity Recover and Climate Experiment), twin satellites launched in March 2002, that are making detailed measurements of Earth's gravity field changes and revolutionizing investigations about Earth’s water resources over land, ice, and oceans, as well as earthquakes and crustal deformations. These discoveries are having far-reaching benefits to society and the world's population.

    MEASURING ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES WITH ALTIMETRY
    Interns will examine altimetry measurements over ice caps, forests, and other areas of the Earth using data from ICESat (2003-2009), ICESat-2 (2018-), and other satellites. Analyses will include data visualization, satellite calibration, and comparisons with complementary measurements and may include ice sheets (Greenland, Antarctica), sea ice, land, vegetation, and ocean/water surfaces. Investigations of some primary questions surrounding the missions include how to link the data from the missions and how to optimally compute changes over time.

    MISSION DESIGN

    OBSERVING EARTH FROM SPACE
    This engineering project will immerse interns in NASA content and activities while learning about rockets, spacecraft trajectories, and observing the Earth from space. While tackling this engineering project, interns will learn about the Sun-Earth-Moon system dynamics, power systems, and communication while designing the mission. Students will design student payloads for the CANDEL satellite system. The students will also have the opportunity to suggest improvements to the CANDEL system itself. Each participating student will, as part of their work, will design an experiment for the CANDEL system.

    EXPLORE THE MOON
    Interns will study the spectral effects of space weathering and impact gardening on the evolution of the lunar soil using remote sensing data. Understanding the effects from these processes improves the ability to map the true composition of planetary crusts.

    MARS EXPLORATION
    NASA is committed to the human exploration of Mars. Many of the technologies are already in place, and the rocket boosters and some of the spacecraft required are currently being built. The small nuclear reactors required to provide the necessary power have already been designed and tested by the Department of Energy. But prior to sending humans to Mars, there needs to be the infrastructure on the planet surface that is necessary to sustain the first crews to visit. This includes power, habitation, water, food, health maintenance, mobility (space suits and rovers), emergency care, and scientific support functions. Using basic engineering design principles, interns will design a Mars village that will allow people to live and work productively and safely for up to 1000 days on the Mars surface. Small scale prototypes will be built by 3D printing.

    ROVING MARS AND MARS 2020
    As the newest NASA rover prepares for its trip to the red planet, scientists have begun to plan for returning the first ever surface samples from Mars. This project will explore how the Mars 2020 rover will traverse the landing site of Jezero Crater and students will come up with a sampling strategy. We will learn how geologist on Earth prioritize samples and develop a plan to return the most valuable samples from Mars.

    VIRTUAL MOSQUITO MAPPER

    Scientists working with GLOBE Observer are leading a Virtual High School Summer Research Internship in 2020. Participants will meet regularly with mentor scientists online and complete a guided 8 week research experience that engages participants in all aspects of the scientific process, while building familiarity with the GLOBE Observer data collection app, NASA Worldview satellite data portal, and data analysis and mapping tools, including Google Earth and ArcGIS. Interns in this program will contribute to both an individual and a team research product focused on GeoHealth, contributing to our understanding of many aspects of science including mosquito population dynamics, environmental change and human health.

     
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    Deanna Buckley
    Tim Urban
    Ariel O'Brien
  • Icon for: Ed Robeck

    Ed Robeck

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 08:10 p.m.

    Great list. I can see why students would be motivated. How much attention is given to the audiences for the work? I ask because many times students are asked to think about people their own age/background/positionality. That works up to a point. I wonder if the students see the potential of their work for different audiences, and audiences different from them.

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 8, 2020 | 12:06 p.m.

    That is an interesting question.  While this has not been a "targeted" goal of SEES, students find great reward when a NASA scientist or engineer watches their final presentation and posts comments about the breadth and depth of their research.  It validates the work they have been doing.  

  • Small default profile

    Anne Ryan

    Parent
    May 7, 2020 | 10:47 p.m.

    Dear Margaret,

    As the mom of one of your former interns, now Rice University Class of 2022, I want you to thank you for your indefatigable devotion to this program.  My daughter has stayed in touch with her group despite their coast (Princeton) to coast (Stanford) destinations.  The SEES experience was invaluable.  Thank you for being a STEM Shero!

     
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    Deanna Buckley
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 8, 2020 | 12:32 p.m.

    Thank you so much.  One of the very BEST aspects of this program is hearing from former interns to help celebrate their accomplishments, goals, and successes.  Please keep in touch!  I love these success stories.

  • May 8, 2020 | 09:29 a.m.

    As a prior NASA Aerospace Education Specialist out of Goddard, and a NASA Graduate Student Research Fellow out of Langley (that funded my Ph.D. work in education), I can say with first hand knowledge how powerful and compelling the context of working on authentic projects for NASA is. It is AWESOME that you have achieved such a large scale of applicants (600 for 60 spots-for onsite internships). Your comprehensive and robust answers really help others learn how they too might learn from your expertise and experiences. Kudos.

    I'm now at Virginia Commonwealth University, and forging collaboration with both the education teams working with Kimberly Brush at Langley and Joyce Winterton at Wallops. We are embarking on some efforts hopefully to begin this summer (probably virtual now).

    Is it possible to see or learn more about the NASA career exploration product that was used in your schools to open students' eyes to Careers at NASA. The diversity of students is high in the surrounding schools in Richmond, Virginia. This would be a valuable component to aid our efforts if publicly available?

    Keep up the wonderful and important work!

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 8, 2020 | 12:04 p.m.

    Thanks so much for the kind remarks.  I am happy to send you a link to the Career Exploration box with all products that were developed.  We have a Career Exploration game similar to monopoly, a slide show were students can look at a NASA career, click on it and view what type of degree is required, and includes more information on the cost of that degree at various institutions, a next generation spacesuit listing all components and what careers are needed to complete it.  Please email me:  baguio@csr.utexas.edu and I'm happy to share.

  • Small default profile

    Kerry Johnson

    K-12 Teacher
    May 12, 2020 | 04:08 p.m.

    I'm one of the past teacher mentors for the SEES program and have always marveled at 3 things:

    1. the enthusiasm and dedication of the students and the amazing work they produce

    2. The dedication of the entire group of scientists/engineers, admin, graduate students, Margaret, and everyone involved with this project

    3.the interest displayed in the results of the students' work at the end of the project when they present to basically the entire faculty, who ask hard hitting questions, take notes, and are obviously interested in what these young students did. 

    As a high school teacher it was an amazing experience for me and I know 2 of my students went through the program and are doing amazing things at college. I'm so jealous :-)

    I have to thank Margaret again for letting me be a part of this program because while the students were definitely enriched by the experience, SSI was I and I translate that back directly into my Physics and Astronomy classes. 

     
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    Tim Urban
  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 12, 2020 | 04:15 p.m.

    Thank YOU for being such a great facilitator and mentor.  Yes, I do agree, the SEES interns are amazing!

  • Icon for: Deanna Buckley

    Deanna Buckley

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2020 | 06:46 p.m.

    What an amazing impact - nice work!

  • Icon for: Margaret Baguio

    Margaret Baguio

    Lead Presenter
    Program Manager - Education and Outreach
    May 12, 2020 | 07:21 p.m.

    Thank you so much.  These are amazing students!

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