2511 Views
  1. Alexander Rudolph
  2. http://www.cpp.edu/~alrudolph
  3. Professor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Cal-Bridge, California Polytechnic University Pomona
  1. Alison Baski
  2. Dean, College of Science
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. California Polytechnic University Pomona
  1. Jordan Ealy
  2. Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. San Diego State University, Cal-Bridge
  1. Nicole Sanchez
  2. Graduate Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. University of Washington
  1. Roberto Tejada Arevalo
  2. Student Researcher
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. California State University - Los Angeles
  1. Vidya Venkatesan
  2. Student
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. California State University - Northridge, Cal-Bridge
Public
Choice

Cal-Bridge: Creating Pathways to the PhD for Underrepresented Students in STEM

NSF Awards: 1741863

2020 (see original presentation & discussion)

Undergraduate, Graduate

This video highlights Cal-Bridge scholar interviews giving voice to the impact the Cal-Bridge program has on their dream of pursuing a PhD in physics or astronomy. Scholars talk about the importance of celebrating differences to promote better science, the critical role mentoring plays in their success, and the way that Cal-Bridge builds community among scholars that makes them feel a sense of belonging that helps them persist in achieving their goals. For more information go to www.calbridge.org.

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Original Discussion from the 2020 STEM For All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 4, 2020 | 03:22 p.m.

    Welcome to the NSF Showcase video for the Cal-Bridge program. The Cal-Bridge program is a California based partnership between the California State University and University of California systems designed to increase the number of underrepresented students obtaining PhDs in physics and astronomy. We are starting a pilot in Computer Science and Engineering this coming year.

    This is our second year participating in the NSF STEM for All Video Showcase. Our first video was from 2018, and you can view it here: https://stemforall2018.videohall.com/presentati.... That video gives a nice introductory overview of the Cal-Bridge program.

    This year, our video is called, "Cal-Bridge: Student Voices," and it highlights interviews with scholars talking about how the program has influenced their journey to obtaining a PhD. There are a number of themes that come up in the video, and I would be curious to hear how all of you react to them:

    1) Differences and diversity. What do we mean when we say we value these ideas in STEM? What arguments do the scholars make in favor of these principles? Do you agree with them? How do these concepts play out in your own work?

    2) Mentoring. The scholars talk about the importance of mentors to their journey. Why do they think mentoring matters? Are there specific things they cite that could be universal? How could those principles be applied to your work?

    3) Community. The scholars talk about (and the video tries to show) how the Cal-Bridge program is building a community of like-minded scholars with a common goal, a community that they can all rely on now and throughout their careers as scientists. Is community an important part of your own work? How could you foster community in that work? One of the challenges the Cal-Bridge program faces in building community is the distributed nature of the program (scholars from 16 different campuses around California). Do you have suggestions for us on how to do this better?

    We hope you enjoyed learning about our amazing scholars through this video. We look forward to hearing your reactions.

    P.S. Since this video was made, we found out that Rob Tejada is heading to Princeton University, Vidya Venkatesan is heading to UC Irvine to work with Dr. Aomawa Shields, whom she references in the video, and Jordan Ealy is heading to the University of Maryland, all three to pursue a PhD in Astrophysics. Nicole Sanchez is, of course, already well on her way to earning her PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Washington.

    All four of them are co-presenters on this video and would be happy to take questions directed at them.

     
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    Michelle Quirke
  • Icon for: Jason Aloisio

    Jason Aloisio

    Manger of Project TRUE
    May 5, 2020 | 01:33 p.m.

    Great video and program. Thanks for sharing. I went back and watched last years program as well. I'd love to know more about the mentoring component of the program. How are students and mentors paired? Are the students trained on how to navigate and utilize their mentors? 

     
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    Roberto Tejada Arevalo
    Nicole Sanchez
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 03:35 p.m.

    The scholars are paired with two mentors: one from their home CSU campus and one from one of our partner UC campuses. This dual mentoring allows them to get multiple perspectives on questions they have about the process of applying to graduate school, including from a professor at a PhD program of the type they are likely to apply to. We try to match area of interest (physics or astronomy) between scholars and mentors, and when possible we try to match gender for women with at least one of the mentors (there frankly aren't enough URM faculty to do that). 

    I don't know if I would call it "training" on how to use mentors, but we talk about the mentoring process during our orientation, i.e., what they can get out of the mentoring relationship, along with introducing some of the issues that mentors can help them with, e.g., time management.

    In addition, we give the mentors tools to help them guide mentees in how to make the most of the mentoring relationship. One excellent example of that is the "mentoring map". We do also provide some training for mentors, though that is an area we hope to improve on.

    Having said all that, I like your idea of training the scholars on how to best use their mentors. I will bring that idea back to our mentoring committee to consider if and how to do that. Thanks!

     
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    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Jordan Ealy

    Jordan Ealy

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 05:39 p.m.

    Hey! This is Jordan Ealy, Cal-Bridge Cohort 5! My mentors, Dr. Aomawa Shields (UCI) and Dr. Douglas Leonard (SDSU), are outstanding! If anything, they are the ones who are training me how to utilize my mentors. They've been my mentors for two years now and having people with varying experiences has taught me soooo much. Whether it was tips for presenting my first poster or keeping my mental health in check, I'm so much more aware of the world I'm stepping into, professional or otherwise!

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Alexander Rudolph
    Roberto Tejada Arevalo
    Shontrice Coleman
  • Icon for: Jason Aloisio

    Jason Aloisio

    Manger of Project TRUE
    May 6, 2020 | 12:17 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing Alexander and Jordan. I really like the mentoring map, emphasizing that no one mentor can provide everything.

    Jordan, have you had the opportunity to utilize what you've learned to now mentor others? 

     
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    Marcello Rossi
  • Icon for: Jordan Ealy

    Jordan Ealy

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 01:52 p.m.

    Yes, I have! I've involved with the Schwartz Astronomical Society (SDSU's astronomy club) as well as the Black Student Science Organization and the Black Resource Center. Interacting with students at different levels, whether they are in the sciences are not, has been one of the highlights of my undergraduate career. As I continue my career, I want to continue establishing meaningful connections. You can only learn so much engaging with people who are within your own bubble. I like being able to mentor others but I feel like just connecting and building relationships with other people is also important. I've learned that everyone can teach you something. They may not be my mentors on paper but they've helped me acknowledge and become aware of many things in my life! 

     
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    Stephen Alkins
    Marcello Rossi
  • Small default profile

    Islam alzoubi

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 04:15 p.m.

    Im proud of you alessa, keep up the good work.

  • Icon for: Marcello Rossi

    Marcello Rossi

    Informal Educator
    May 5, 2020 | 04:40 p.m.

    Well done. Truly inspirational and wonderful. Thank you for your dedication and work. Video quality is superb.

     
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    Shontrice Coleman
    Roberto Tejada Arevalo
    Alexander Rudolph
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 04:51 p.m.

    Thank you!

  • Icon for: Shontrice Coleman

    Shontrice Coleman

    May 5, 2020 | 05:59 p.m.

    I work for Cal-Bridge as a program coordinator and it is truly amazing to see how the program has impacted so many scholar's lives for the better. A program like this will help to change the field of Stem forever. Cal-Bridge is an amazing program and I'm personally very proud to be a part of it!

  • Icon for: Stephen Alkins

    Stephen Alkins

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 10:26 p.m.

    As someone who has gone through this experience, mentoring offers to help navigate the process of applying, but how to seek out healthy environments once you arrive at graduate school.  I appreciate the pairing with two mentors because students should learn to cultivate different relationships and understand the strengths of different mentors.

    • What types of training do your mentors undergo?  Are there culturally relevant and responsive practices that are woven into the fabric of the program.  This would seem especially crucial as the reality (as mentioned in the video) that astronomy and physics lack diversity.
    • What evidence do you have of students maintaining these mentoring relationships through their graduate programs?

         Thank you for the great video!

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 11:12 p.m.

    You raise an excellent point about the need for culturally relevant practices, and I have to say that we are working on it. Mentor training is probably one of our weak points, but we do provide sessions using materials developed by Center for the Improvement of Mentoring Experiences in Research (CIMER), one of the most advanced groups in this area.

    As for maintaining the relationships in graduate school, we have developed a nationwide peer mentoring program specifically to keep the group in touch over time as a way to build a community they can lean on. In some cases, scholars follow each other to the same graduate program allowing the more advanced scholars to near peer mentor their younger colleagues. We have a number of examples where that made the difference between scholars dropping out and sticking with it.

    Finally, I would say that the mentoring of these diverse scholars by the UC faculty is having an impact on the culture of at least some of those departments. I would particularly point you towards UC Irvine, where 7 Cal-Bridge scholars have matriculated, and where Katy Rodriguez Wimberly, a former Cal-Bridge scholar, started a peer mentoring program called PACE, which provides near peer mentoring for the entire entering class of PhD students each year.

     
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    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Ann Gates

    Ann Gates

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 6, 2020 | 01:31 a.m.

    I enjoyed watching your video and can definitely see a connection with CAHSI efforts.  Can you elaborate on the criteria for mentor-mentee matching? How is the mentoring experience monitored? Does the source of funding for students' graduate studies come from the doctoral-granting institution?

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 12:49 p.m.

    We match one mentor from the scholar's home CSU campus and the other from one of our regional UC partners (either north or south). If there is an overlap of interest in research topic, we try to match that as well. At the very least, we try to match physics and astronomy interests together. We also try to give every woman scholar at least one woman mentor, but given how few women there are in our fields, that is often not possible. It is almost impossible to match race or ethnicity, since there are so few faculty who are URMs. But when possible, we have done that as well.

    We have two steering committees (one for each region of northern and southern California) that meets 2-3 times per semester and receives reports from the mentors on scholar progress. In addition to giving us information about whether a scholar needs additional help or guidance, these check-ins also give us some insight on how the mentor-mentee relationship is going. Occasionally we have had to switch mentors and there a few (not many) mentors we have eased out of the program.

    In physics and astronomy, funding in PhD programs typically comes from the graduate program. However, we do provide a $10,000 stipend to first year graduate students who attend one of our UC partner institutions, which can be used, together with some department or university funds, to buy them out of one term of being a T.A. (the usual support for the first year or two of most PhD programs) so they can focus on classes or passing their qualifying exam. Also, 7 of our scholars have won NSF Graduate Research Fellowships which provides 3 years of independent funding, and others have been awarded special scholarships by their universities.

     
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    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Roberto Tejada Arevalo

    Roberto Tejada Arevalo

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 01:05 p.m.

    Hi everyone! I wanted to express that being a Cal-Bridge scholar has been an absolute honor. Cal-Bridge has given me the necessary tools and close mentorship to prepare me for graduate school over the past two years. I've participated in two astronomy internships at UC San Diego and Stanford University, and I've attended two American Astronomical Society (AAS) conferences in the past two years.  I'm available if anyone has any questions from a student's perspective that is moving on to a graduate program in the fall to study exoplanet transit detection, largely thanks to the preparation and mentorship provided by my Cal-Bridge mentors and the program as a whole.

    - Rob

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Stephen Alkins
    Jordan Ealy
    Alexander Rudolph
  • Icon for: Wendy Smith

    Wendy Smith

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 07:55 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing about your important Cal-Bridge program. I agree that increasing the number of underrepresented students getting advanced degrees in physics and astronomy (and all STEM subjects) is crucially important. Have you thought about offering advice (perhaps in the form of a webinar or short video) to departments that lack diversity and perhaps are not hiring graduates from historically underrepresented groups due to a mixture of implicit bias and explicit racism/ gender bias/ etc.? Preparing more students and connecting them in a community with each other and with mentors is fabulous, and I'm wondering what can be done to change the culture of the target departments so their cultures will value having a more diverse group of faculty?

     
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    Jordan Ealy
    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 12:16 p.m.

    You bring up an excellent point. One of our long term goals is to impact the culture at PhD programs nationwide, especially those we work with. There are two main ways that happens:

    1) As Cal-Bridge scholars matriculate to and succeed at these PhD programs, perceptions about students from underrepresented groups changes. By selecting and supporting these scholars so carefully, we show PhD programs that such selection and support can help them admit and support such students themselves. We have explicitly worked with some of our UC and other partners to help them in this process, e.g., by sharing our selection criteria and rubrics.

    2) Simply by mentoring these scholars for 2 years as undergraduates, UC faculty gain a much deeper insight into the various reasons, other than inability to do the work, that student from these backgrounds can have records that don't match their true abilities. This sustained contact has also had an impact on the culture of PhD programs by changing the attitudes of members of the department.

    We have discussed more explicitly advising departments, but I would note that there are already experts in what is commonly called "holistic admissions" such as our research partner, Dr. Julie Posselt of USC, who work with departments to help them develop admissions practices based on known research about what predicts success and graduate school and consistent with the departments goals and ethos. I highly recommend you check out her website

  • Icon for: Vidya Venkatesan

    Vidya Venkatesan

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 12:19 p.m.

    Hey Everyone! I am Vidya Venkatesan, an international student at CSU, Northridge, and a Cal-bridge scholar. Cal-bridge has not only invigorated my motivation to pursue a Ph.D. through mentorship, workshops, conference grants, and internships but also made my dream of researching on exoplanets come true. As an international student, I had minimal REU options available for me. Through Cal-bridge, I could attend an REU at Stanford as a sophomore and presented my research on Solar Physics at the AAS, where I met one of my role models in the field of exoplanets, Professor Aomawa Shields from UC, Irvine. Cal-bridge also made it possible for me to work with Dr. Shields over the summer during my junior year. This year, I got into UC, Irvine's Astrophysics Ph.D. program, and will continue to work with my role model starting this Fall. Cal-bridge program is changing students' life in a significant way, and I am so proud to be a part of it!

     
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    Jordan Ealy
  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 04:36 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this video and the great program! The Cal-Bridge program might provide one solution to help increase diversity in certain fields (e.g., having more girls pursue advanced degrees and career in Computer Science field). I wonder about the possibility of expanding this program to other campuses or subject areas considering there are only certain number of professors/scholars in a field who can pair with students as a mentor. I would also like to know more about how you are evaluating the impact of Cal-Bridge program. It looks qualitative data have been collected to measure the experience/perception of those participants. Were quantitative data also collected to measure the program impact on pursue PhDs in physics and astronomy (e.g., number of program participants who go on to pursue their PhDs in these fields as comparing with their non-program counterparts)?

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 04:55 p.m.

    In fact, we are planning a pilot program in CS this coming year and hope to add other disciplines as we recruit faculty to lead such efforts. We are very interested in helping other geographic regions develop similar programs and are happy to discuss with any partners who are interested.

    As for evaluation, we are definitely collecting both qualitative and quantitative data. Much of the positive feedback on the program is well represented by the video. We have an independent evaluator collecting survey and interview data from scholars, and they uniformly list mentoring as the most important element of the program, followed by financial support and community/networking. 

    A total of 38 scholars are currently or will be enrolled in PhD programs across the country this fall, representing 2/3 of our scholars who have earned their BS and applied. Cal-Bridge scholars have begun PhD programs in physics, astronomy, and closely related fields at top PhD programs nationally, including 5 UC programs: UC Davis, UC Irvine, UC Merced, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Santa Cruz; and 14 non-UC PhD programs: University of Arizona, Arizona State University, Caltech, University of Chicago, Georgia State University, Harvard University, University of Maryland, MIT, Michigan State University, University of Nevada, Reno, Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Oregon Health Sciences University (Medical Physics), Pennsylvania State University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, University of Southern California (USC), Texas Christian University, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and University of Wyoming. Seven (7) of these scholars have won NSF Graduate Research Fellowships and four more received an Honorable Mention.

    It is almost impossible to find a comparable comparison group, but nationally only 2% of URM students in STEM pursue a PhD. In addition, the interviews and other testimony of scholars, such as is found in our video, make it clear that they believe they would not have achieved their dream of pursuing a PhD without the program. I consider such firsthand testimony to be very powerful evidence of the efficacy of our proram.

     
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    Jordan Ealy
  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 11, 2020 | 07:18 p.m.

    Thanks for the detailed explanation. I agree that the qualitative data collected via interview, focus group, etc. would give you more insightful information on the impact than quantitative data, though the scale might be smaller.

  • May 7, 2020 | 05:37 p.m.

    Hi Alexander, This video walked through a lot of interactions and support through the student's eyes. The 'platform to find mentors like us' was so powerful that I did further research on Dr. Aomawa Shields. What an inspiration! A wonderful program and video. 

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 06:40 p.m.

    Thank you! Dr. Shields is very inspirational. The fact that she took on Vidya as a summer student and that now Vidya is going to UCI this fall to do her PhD with Dr. Shields is exactly the kind of networking and community we are trying to build through the Cal-Bridge program.

  • May 9, 2020 | 01:14 p.m.

     As a STEM scholar at an urban facing university, Virginia Commonwealth University, I am encouraged with your focus and attention to diversity supporting opportunity, ensuring creativity at the highest level of scholarship! So much is supporting through efforts you are providing as students stretch themselves, increase their self-efficacy. Thank you for sharing your efforts!

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 9, 2020 | 01:31 p.m.

    I think the mid-Atlantic coast (Virginia, DC, Maryland) could be a great place to start a regional network like ours to promote underrepresented students pursuing PhDs in STEM. If you are interested, let me know and we can talk. It would be even better if you chatted with your colleagues, both at VCU and elsewhere in the area, to gauge their interest. One of our long-term goals is to help recreate this model in other geographic regions.

    P.S. Our Dean of Science at Cal Poly Pomona is Alison Baski (also a co-presenter on this video) who was Interim Dean of Science at VCU before she moved to California. Do you know her?

  • May 11, 2020 | 12:17 p.m.

    Good morning. Apologies for a delayed response. I'm now approaching my second year at VCU, and unfortunately did not know Dr. Baski. I'm in the school of education at VCU (STEM education), so less the pure sciences, but inspiring the next generation of STEM teachers that help secondary students decide to pursue more arduous coursework and STEM careers!

     

    If you'd like Alexander, I'd be happy to forward this thread "up the chain" and the URL of this video to my Dean, maybe a few in the hard sciences, see if they'd like a conversation!

    Al

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 11, 2020 | 12:40 p.m.

    It can't hurt to point them at the video and our website (www.calbridge.org) and gauge their interest. Feel free to share my e-mail with them (alrudolph@cpp.edu) and they can reach out if they like. Thanks!

  • Icon for: Alison Baski

    Alison Baski

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 09:18 p.m.

    Dear Alex/Albert,

    Before coming to Cal Poly Pomona in 2016, I was at VCU in the dean's office in the College of Humanities and Sciences for five years. During my 20 years at VCU, I had a number of colleagues in the School of Education (Roz Hobson Hargraves, Maike Philipsen, Valerie Robnolt, Terry Dozier). Collaborations between the sciences and education are exceedingly important.

    As you have seen, the Cal-Bridge program does an amazing job of leveraging across the CSU and UC systems to broaden the STEM pipeline for disciplines with low percentages of women and historically underrepresented minorities, e.g., physics and astronomy.

    I am an experimental physicist myself and remember my own undergraduate/graduate experiences where there were no women and no minorities teaching any of my STEM courses for eight years. 

    Through a very structured approach, Cal-Bridge is successfully starting to diversity the pipeline of students entering Ph.D. programs and should make a measurable impact on national statistics over the next 5 to 10 years! 

  • Icon for: Scott Hildreth

    Scott Hildreth

    Professor of Astronomy & Physics
    May 9, 2020 | 05:14 p.m.

    I'd like to add to the discussion, from the view of an instructor at one of California's Community Colleges, where I can share these stories of current Cal-Bridge scholars with my students who aspire to transfer to CSU and UC. The video shown here, and all of the resources that are shared with community college participants in the program, are enormously inspiring.  One of my goals is to encourage students to consider transfer, and offer them a view of a very possible, and rewarding future in science.  Many of the CSU and UC graduates start out at a community college, and the program's ability to reach my students is another very positive aspect of its power.

     
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    Alexander Rudolph
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 9, 2020 | 08:06 p.m.

    Thank you, Scott, for your comment. Yes, more than half of Cal-Bridge scholars start at California community colleges before transferring to a CSU and they include some of our best!

  • Small default profile

    SRINIVASAN VENKATESAN

    Parent
    May 10, 2020 | 01:55 a.m.

    Dear Professor. The showcasing of intellectual interests and past achievements by the individual budding scholars was illuminating. The scheme of regularly monitoring and mentoring them for the cause of a futuristic science is commendable. Wishing all the students a great journey in seeking knowledge beyond the stars. Dr. S. Venkatesan, Professor in Clinical Psychology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, Karnataka: 570 006, INDIA

     
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    Alexander Rudolph
  • Icon for: Vidya Venkatesan

    Vidya Venkatesan

    Co-Presenter
    May 10, 2020 | 04:35 a.m.

    Thanks for showing your support to my scholarship program, dad!!

  • Icon for: SRINIVASAN VENKATESAN

    SRINIVASAN VENKATESAN

    Parent
    May 10, 2020 | 01:55 a.m.

    Dear Professor. The showcasing of intellectual interests and past achievements by the individual budding scholars was illuminating. The scheme of regularly monitoring and mentoring them for the cause of a futuristic science is commendable. Wishing all the students a great journey in seeking knowledge beyond the stars. Dr. S. Venkatesan, Professor in Clinical Psychology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, Karnataka: 570 006, INDIA

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 10, 2020 | 03:35 p.m.

    Thank you, Dr. Venkatesan, for your kind words. Your daughter is a delight and will be an amazing astrophysicist we will all be proud of.

  • Small default profile

    Cristilyn Gardner

    Graduate Student
    May 11, 2020 | 01:59 p.m.

    This program changed my life. It supported me throughout my bachelors, helped me get into a summer internship, and gave me the confidence and ability to get into a PhD program in Physics. Thank you Dr. Rudolph and administrative team for all of your care and support!!

     
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    Alexander Rudolph
  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 11, 2020 | 03:13 p.m.

    You are so welcome! Truly, your success, plus your wonderful efforts to pay it forward to the Cal-Bridge scholars following in your footsteps, is all the thanks we need.

  • May 11, 2020 | 07:13 p.m.

    A great program supporting students pursuits into physics and astronomy - actually helping students reach for the stars! And complete support with mentorship and guidance through application, professional development.  

  • Icon for: Graciela Solis

    Graciela Solis

    Researcher
    May 12, 2020 | 07:56 p.m.

    I loved both physics and astronomy when I was younger but didn't think I could do that kind of work. It's so wonderful to see you encouraging children to pursue their dreams and see beyond perceived limitations.

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