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Icon for: Dr. Doug Duncan

DR. DOUG DUNCAN

University of Colorado Boulder, Fiske Planetarium - CU

Enhancement of Astronomy and Earth Science Teaching Using High Resolution Imm...

NNX16AB88A

2018 (see original presentation & discussion)

Informal / multi-age

Water is a resource vital to life, growth, and the health of our entire planet. Even our bodies are 75% water.  When there's a drought, and dry reservoirs, we worry, but what about water under the ground? Almost half of Americans get their drinking water from wells.  California pumps 11 billion gallons every day - 300 gallons for every person in the state! Can we detect underground droughts? NASA's GRACE satellites can. The two satellites, nicknamed "Tom" and "Jerry" chase each other endlessly around the earth and monitor their separation with incredible accuracy. When one flies over water-soaked ground there is more gravitational pull than from dry ground, and the satellite moves differently and NASA scientists can tell farmers and planners where the underground droughts are.  This video is a spectacular 360 degree full-dome presentation, with both animation and 360 degree video. It includes an interview with a young woman scientist who uses GRACE and invites viewers to consider a career like hers.

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Original Discussion from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Dr. Doug Duncan

    Dr. Doug Duncan

    Lead Presenter
    Astronomer, Planetarium Director
    May 13, 2018 | 09:01 p.m.

    We'd love to hear WHAT DO YOU THINK are the most important things that NASA does? Many people know the Hubble Telescope and that NASA rovers roam across Mars.  But do you know what planet NASA studies the most?  Do you know what the first "A" in NASA stands for, WITHOUT LOOKING IT UP?!

    Our videos explore the surprisingly wide world of NASA, tracking pollution, underground water, all sorts of useful things - from space. Our next video is about "CubeSats" cute little satellites the size of a shoe box.  And yes, NASA does test airplanes in wind tunnels (did you see Hidden Figures? That's a real NASA wind tunnel)

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2018 | 12:05 p.m.

    Thank you for the video, Doug. Great to hear that you have done front end work to discover what audiences for your programs already know about NASA's work. Curious how you are assessing impact and what you are learning about which learning strategies and platforms have traction.

  • Icon for: Dr. Doug Duncan

    Dr. Doug Duncan

    Lead Presenter
    Astronomer, Planetarium Director
    May 14, 2018 | 01:11 p.m.

    We’re at an early stage assessing impact. Right now we’re just measuring distribution and a “pre” survey what audiences knew about NASA coming in. We do live surveying at our own museum and surveys at others. We may simply ask, “ what’s the most interesting thing you learned about NASA? Ideas about what else we might do

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 08:52 p.m.

    Thanks Doug. I'd also be curious to ask what kinds of questions visitors leave with, as a way of seeing which phenomena, missions, etc. are generative of further exploration and learning.

  • Icon for: Kalie Sacco

    Kalie Sacco

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2018 | 12:25 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this project, Doug. Is there any particular age group or other audience segment that you are targeting through this project?

  • Icon for: Dr. Doug Duncan

    Dr. Doug Duncan

    Lead Presenter
    Astronomer, Planetarium Director
    May 16, 2018 | 10:36 a.m.

    Hi Kalie, we expect to be understood by older elementary through adult.  We want high school students to think that space-related careers are interesting.

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2018 | 03:21 p.m.

    A few compelling story lines here- NASA's rich and varied scope of research, sometimes relatively unknown beyond space exploration, the amazing technology of the Grace satellites in mapping water (and lack of) on earth and the opportunities for exciting, satisfying careers in science. What kinds of experiences do you find have been transformative for audiences?

  • Icon for: Dr. Doug Duncan

    Dr. Doug Duncan

    Lead Presenter
    Astronomer, Planetarium Director
    May 20, 2018 | 01:03 p.m.

    Gathering responses now. Don’t know yet

  • Icon for: Jamie Bell

    Jamie Bell

    Facilitator
    May 21, 2018 | 08:36 a.m.

    Great work, Doug, looking forward to hearing about your findings and future directions.

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

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