3937 Views
  1. Cindy Ziker
  2. https://www.sri.com/about/people/cindy-ziker
  3. Senior Researcher
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. SRI International
  1. kamal Ali
  2. http://www.jsums.edu
  3. Chair
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Jackson State University
  1. Derrick Gilmore
  2. Director of Research, Grants and Sponsored Programs
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. Kentucky State University
  1. Clay Gloster
  2. Associate Dean
  3. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  4. North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina A&T State University
  1. J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias
  2. http://www.morgan.edu/school_of_engineering/departments/electrical_and_computer_engineering/faculty_and_staff/dr_j_kemi_ladeji-osias.html
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Presenter’s NSFRESOURCECENTERS
  5. Morgan State University

Collaborative Research: Early STEM Engagement for Minority Males through a Ne...

NSF Awards: 1649231, 1649213, 1649220, 1649267, 1649316

2017 (see original presentation & discussion)

Grades 6-8

Minority males are underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce as compared to their representation in the US population. Roadblocks that continue to challenge minority males include: disparity in access to high quality STEM educational resources, a lack of role models, and a shortage of highly trained, minority STEM educators. Drawing on findings from current work, this Design and Development Launch Project, led by Morgan State University, will build on an existing regional partnership of four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) that are working together to improve STEM outcomes for middle school minority male students local to Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, North Carolina A & T University, in Greensboro, North Carolina, Jackson State University in Mississippi, and Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky. Additional partners include eight minority serving institutions, the National CARES Mentoring Network, the Verizon Foundation, and SRI International. Using collective impact-style approaches, these partners will address two common goals: 1) Broaden the participation of underrepresented minority males in science and engineering through educational experiences that prepare them for careers in STEM fields; and (2) Create a Network Improvement Community focused on STEM achievement in minority males. Our vision for collective impact of the eSEM project is to leverage a Network Improvement Community that will help to increase the number of minority males in grades 6 – 12 who are prepared for college and STEM careers, with the skills needed to participate in the STEM workforce.

This video has had approximately 371 visits by 311 visitors from 137 unique locations. It has been played 179 times.
activity map thumbnail Click to See Activity Worldwide
Map reflects activity with this presentation from the 2017 STEM for All Video Showcase: Research and Design for Impact website, as well as the STEM For All Multiplex website.
Based on periodically updated Google Analytics data. This is intended to show usage trends but may not capture all activity from every visitor.
show more
Original Discussion from the 2017 STEM for All Video Showcase
  • Icon for: Cindy Ziker

    Cindy Ziker

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Researcher
    May 14, 2017 | 05:30 p.m.

    Welcome to our INCLUDES Launch and Development Pilot "Early STEM Engagement for Minority Males through a Network of Minority Serving Institutions (eSEM). Leveraging collective impact approaches, our project builds on the Verizon Innovative Learning Minority Male Program at 16 minority serving institutions across the country. Visit our website to learn more about our efforts to support underrepresented students in science and engineering at esem-includes.org

     

  • Icon for: Donna Charlevoix

    Donna Charlevoix

    Program Director
    May 15, 2017 | 12:51 p.m.

    This looks like a very interesting project and I imaging it will be able to ramp up quickly since you are tied in to an existing community of HBCUs. Could you talk a little bit about the logistics of how you are connecting the secondary students with the university network? Are faculty helping to run the program (and is it mainly out of school, informal learning)? Thanks!

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Lauren Amos
  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 07:57 a.m.

    Each HBCU and HSI recruits students in their local community, using approaches that build relationships and work well for their target population group. Many of the universities have existing relationships with the school districts. During the summer, each campus has a STEM program that lasts two - four weeks. These students are also engaged during the academic on the University campus, or at their school. The activities occur outside of the school day. many participating universities involve teachers, who are able to infuse their lessons with new technology.

  • Icon for: Marcelo Worsley

    Marcelo Worsley

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 11:06 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this video. You have brought together a great group of institutions and organizations. I'd love to hear more about your program. In particular, can you share more about the culturally responsive practices that you are using and how you are measuring the impact of the program?

  • Icon for: Michael Lach

    Michael Lach

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 10:41 p.m.

    I was wondering about this same thing!

  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 02:48 p.m.

    Each site has the the flexibility to select topics of interest to their participant pool. At Morgan State University, we integrate culturally responsive practices in two ways. The first is in the selection of projects. Many of our activities are project based and we select topics that may be very familiar or facilitate brainstorming for an appropriate problem. For example, have them apply their 3D design skills to develop models of bus shelters, which many of them would encounter on the way to school. Second, we integrate creative time, that allows students to contextualize what they have learned. For example, when we teach new skills, we provide time for participants to apply the skills in their own way.

  • Icon for: Michael Lach

    Michael Lach

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 10:41 p.m.

    I'm also curious about how your "collective impact" model works. What can you share to others who might want to build similar partnerships?

  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 11:24 p.m.

    As we are building our network, we are exploring networked improvement communities and collective impact as two models for solving complex social problems. The NIC will allow us to identify and develop solutions to some problems impacting minority male achievement in an iterative cycle. Collective impact allows us to consider a structure that creates an Alliance between multiple partners.

    Here are two links for more information:

    - Why a NIC? https://www.carnegiefoundation.org/blog/why-a-nic/

    - Collective Impact https://ssir.org/articles/entry/collective_impact

  • Icon for: Lauren Amos

    Lauren Amos

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2017 | 05:42 p.m.

    Such a great program! Is your project at a stage where it could serve as a model for other HBCUs and HSIs that wish to replicate your program? Are you able to offer documentation, training, or technical assistance of any kind?

  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 11:03 p.m.

    While our program is not yet ready for replication, we are happy to provide some of our published best practices. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Lauren Amos
  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 11:04 p.m.

    While our program is not ready for replication, we are happy to share our published best practices.

  • Icon for: Cindy Ziker

    Cindy Ziker

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Researcher
    May 18, 2017 | 01:50 a.m.

    Hi Marcelo, Thanks so much for your comments. Culturally responsive practices are built in to the mentoring component of our program, which is described in a webinar that can be found on our web site at esem-includes.org

    We measure increases in student's interest in STEM careers and STEM course work through an online pre and post survey, and student academic performance using a program-based assessment. We are in the beginning stages of measuring progress towards our goal of building a NIC and have collected data on such indicators as the number of hits to our website and the number of attendees at our webinars. 

     

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Lauren Amos
  • Icon for: Valerie Butler

    Valerie Butler

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 18, 2017 | 12:06 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your important work. I am a life science content provider in Baltimore working with teachers and students in multiple grandes in about 40 schools in the Baltimore City Public School district. I would be interested in exploring ways we might be able to partner together. You can explore our work via video #1025 or bioeyes.org. I attended a wonderful conference at Morgan State University last year on the topic of culturally responsive pedagogy and came back and worked with my colleagues on ways to integrate those practices into our curriculum. I would love to offer our students more opportunities but we are limited in our capacity to take on a mentoring component at this time. I look forward to watching the NIC grow and develop over time.

  • Icon for: J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 09:39 p.m.

    I am excited about the work you are doing in Baltimore City and am definitely interested in talking with you more offline. I would be happy to share more about our approach to mentoring.

    https://whse2.morgan.edu/apex/f?p=372:1:0::NO:::

  • Further posting is closed as the event has ended.

Multiplex Discussion
  • Post to the Discussion

    If you have an account, please login before contributing. New visitors may post with email verification.


    For visitors, we require email verification before we will post your comment. When you receive the email click on the verification link and your message will be made visible.



    Name:

    Email:

    Role:
    NOTE: Your email will be kept private and will not be shared with any 3rd parties